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Posts from the ‘Featured Recipes’ Category

Recipe: Black Truffle Butter Gougeres

Classic gougeres are already a cocktail hour favorite, but add our Black Truffle Butter, and they become completely irresistible.  These delectable little puffs pair equally well with champagne or cocktails, making them perfect for aperitif.  We won’t tell how easy they are to make!

Black Truffle Butter Gougeres

Ingredients
1 cup milk
1 cup water
7 tablespoons D’Artagnan Black Truffle Butter
3/4 teaspoon coarse salt
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus 1 tablespoon
1/4 teaspoon D’Artagnan Black Truffle Oil
4 large eggs
1 3/4 cups Gruyère cheese, finely grated
Freshly-ground black pepper, to taste

gougeres blog

Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheets with silpat mats or parchment paper; set aside.

2. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, add milk, water, truffle butter and salt. Bring to a boil. Add flour, all at once. Cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until dough comes together and creates a film on bottom and sides of the pot, 5 to 10 minutes.

3. Remove from heat. Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, allow to cool slightly, about 5 minutes.

4. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing after each addition. Add truffle oil. Finished dough should form peaks that droop over and be smooth and glossy.

5. Drop 1 tablespoon sized balls of dough onto the prepared baking sheets. (1 tbs. sized cookie scoop works well for this, or a spoon + wet fingers. Dough may also be piped with a pastry bag.) Top each gougere with a large pinch of gruyere. Season the gougeres with pepper.

6. Transfer to preheated oven and bake until puffed and golden brown, rotating pan once mid-baking, about 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Featured Recipe: Blini with Caviar

Perfect for your New Year’s Eve fete, this easy recipe for blini uses all-purpose flour instead of buckwheat for a light texture and delicate flavor that lets our French caviar shine! Give it a try!

Buttery blini make a tasty cushion for our French ossetra caviar.

Buttery blini make a tasty cushion for our French ossetra caviar.

Ingredients

2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast, (one 1/4 ounce envelope)
1/2 cup warm water, (about 110 degrees)
1 cup all-purpose flour
Coarse sea salt or fleur de sel, to taste
1/2 cup buttermilk
1 tablespoon unsalted butter, melted, plus more for pan
1/2 teaspoon sugar
2 large eggs, seperated
Crème Fraîche, for serving
D’Artagnan Farm-Raised Ossetra Caviar, for serving

Preparation

1. In a small bowl, add water and sprinkle yeast over the top. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Sift together flour and 1/2 teaspoon plus a pinch of salt. Stir together buttermilk, butter, sugar, and egg yolks in a large bowl; whisk in yeast mixture, then flour mixture. Let stand, covered, in a warm place for 30 minutes.

2. Beat egg whites until stiff peaks form; fold into batter. Let stand for 10 minutes

3. Heat a medium nonstick skillet over medium heat, and coat with a thin layer of butter. Add a scant tablespoon batter for each blini and cook, flipping after bubbles appear at edges and color turns golden, 1 1/2 to 2 minutes per side

4. Transfer to a lined sheet tray and allow to cool.

5. Garnish with a small dollop of crème fraîche, then top with a spoon of D’Artagnan ossetra caviar. Serve immediately.

Featured Recipe: Chicken with Autumn Vegetables and Madeira

This wonderful recipe is adapted from Chef Frank Stitt’s excellent cookbook, Southern Table. The warming dish is Chef Stitt’s version of coq au vin, made with Madeira instead of red wine, served over puréed root vegetables and topped with crispy bits of country ham. We think it’s the perfect dish for rainy fall weather.

photo courtesy of Artisan Publishing

Chicken with Autumn Vegetables and Madeira
Serves 8

Ingredients

For the Autumn Vegetable Puree:

2 medium turnips, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
2 small carrots, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 medium parsnip, peeled and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 medium sweet potato, peeled and cut into small chunks
1/2 medium rutabaga, peeled, trimmed and cut ino small chunks
1 to 3 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature

For the Chicken:
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 Organic Free-Range Chicken, 3 to 4 lbs, rinsed and cut into serving pieces
Salt and coarsely-ground black pepper
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 medium onions, diced
3 medium carrots, peeled and sliced 1/2 inch thick
1 cup medium-dry Madeira
1 cup dry white wine
2 cups homemade chicken stock or canned low-sodium broth
2 to 3 sprigs thyme
3 bay leaves
2 slices country ham, thin slices, cut into thin julienne strips

Glazed Root Vegetables, if desired

Preparation
1. In a large heavy sauté pan, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Season the chicken with salt and pepper. Raise the heat to medium-high and sear the pieces on all sides until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Transfer the chicken to a rack set over a baking sheet and set aside.

2. Wipe the pan clean with a paper towel. Melt 1 tablespoon of the butter in the pan over medium heat. Add the onions and carrots and cook until softened and golden, about 10 minutes. Add the Madeira and white wine, bring to a boil, and reduce by three-quarters. Add the broth, thyme, and bay leaves and bring to a simmer.

3. Place the chicken in a casserole and pour the simmering broth over it. Cover the chicken with parchment paper, then cover the pan with a lid or aluminum foil and braise in the oven until tender, about 15 minutes for the breast and 45 to 55 minutes for the dark meat. Remove the pieces as they are done and transfer to a rack set over a baking sheet.

4. Strain the braising liquid into a large saucepan and set the pan over medium-high heat, half on and half off the burner so you can easily skim off the fat as it rises to the cooler side of the pan. Reduce by about half, 10 to 15 minutes. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons butter bit by bit, swirling it into the sauce. Add the chicken to the pan and heat through.

5. Spoon the vegetable purée onto individual plates. Arrange the chicken next to the purée and then the glazed vegetables (if serving) alongside. Garnish with the little strips of country ham.

Featured Recipe: Rabbit Stew with Olives

It’s grey and a bit chilly in the Northeast, so we’re thinking stew for dinner. Here’s a warming recipe for rabbit stew from our friend, Chef Marco Canora of Hearth Restaurant in New York City. Marco’s classic Tuscan stew is just right for fall – hearty and satisfying but not too heavy. And it just so happens that natural rabbit fryers are on sale right now at dartagnan.com

Cooked stove top, this bright, rich stew will perfume your home with the heady scent of rosemary, olives and red wine.

Marco Canora’s Rabbit Stew with Nicoise Olives and Rosemary

feeds 4 generously, serve with crusty bread and hearty red wine

2 D’Artagnan Whole Natural Rabbits, cut into 10 pieces each
Coarse salt &  freshly cracked pepper
7 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup dry red wine
1 medium onion, peeled and minced
1 carrot, peeled and minced
2 celery stalks, minced
2 tablespoons tomato paste
1 bunch rosemary sprigs, tied together
5 1/2 cups chicken broth
1/2 cup Nicoise olives, pitted if desired

Preparation
1. Season the rabbit pieces with salt and pepper. Heat enough oil to coat the bottom of a large skillet, about 3 tablespoons, over medium-high heat. Working in batches, brown the rabbit pieces, about 3 minutes on each side, then set aside in a bowl.

2. When all of the meat is browned, add the wine and deglaze the pan, scraping up the fond (browned bits) with a wooden spoon. Allow the wine to simmer for a minute or two, then pour it over the browned rabbit and reserve.

3. Wipe out the skillet. Add the remaining 4 tablespoons oil and heat over medium-high heat. Add the onion, carrot, and celery. Fry, stirring frequently and adjusting the heat if necessary to prevent burning, until the vegetables soften and color, about 10 minutes. Add the tomato paste and rosemary. Stir to coat the vegetables and cook until the paste darkens, about 5 minutes.

4. Return the rabbit and wine to the pan, lower the heat to medium, and stir to mix. Cook the rabbit, stirring occasionally, until its juices release, about 10 minutes.

5. Add enough broth to come a little less than halfway up the rabbit pieces, about 2 cups. Simmer the rabbit partially covered, turning it in the pan and basting it occasionally, until the pan is almost dry, about 15 minutes. Add more broth, about 1 cup, and continue simmering and basting the rabbit, adding a little broth whenever the pan looks dry (expect to add 1/2 cup about every 15 minutes). Stew until the rabbit is almost tender, about 1 hour.

6. Flip the rabbit pieces over and add the olives. Continue adding broth a little at a time and simmer until the rabbit is fully
tender, about 15 minutes more (if the meat pulls easily from the leg bone, the rabbit is done). Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper, reduce the heat to low, and cook for 5 more minutes to allow the seasoning to penetrate. Serve warm in shallow bowls.

Chile Rubbed Ribeyes with Cilantro Butter

We wanted to share this simple recipe with you, {and just in time for Labor Day grilling!} BBQ Master, Ray Lampe’s mouthwatering Chile Rubbed Ribeye Steaks with Cilantro Butter. Learn his grill-savvy techniques and become a master of your own backyard BBQ. And check out Ray’s other recipes in his awesome book, Ribs, Chops, Steaks, and Wings, and on his website Dr. BBQ. We dare you not to drool.

Ray Lampe’s Chile-Rubbed Rib-Eye Steaks with Cilantro Butter

Ingredients

2 teaspoons olive oil
1/2 cup fresh cilantro leaves, finely chopped
1 large shallot, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
1 pinch coarsely-ground black pepper
1 stick butter, at room temperature
4 tablespoons good-quality chile powder
2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon granulated garlic
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon smoked paprika
D’Artagnan Domestic Bone-In Rib-Eye Steaks, 1 1/2 inches thick

1. At least a few hours before you plan to cook, make the Cilantro Butter. In a small skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the cilantro, shallot, and garlic and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring often, until the shallot is soft. Transfer to a bowl and set aside to cool. In a medium bowl, cream the butter with a fork. Add the cilantro mixture and blend well. Transfer to a 12-x-12-inch sheet of waxed paper and form into a log about 8 inches long in the center of the sheet. If the mixture is too warm to handle just refrigerate for a couple of minutes until it is ready. Now roll the butter up in the wax paper to make a firm log and twist the ends to hold it tight. Place in the freezer until firm. This can be made ahead and kept in the freezer for up to 1 month.

2. One hour before you plan to cook, make the Chili Rub. In a small bowl, mix together the chili powder, salt, granulated garlic, onion powder, and smoked paprika. Add the oil and mix well. Place the steaks on a big platter and brush the wet chili rub evenly on both sides of the steaks. Refrigerate until ready to cook.

3. Prepare the grill for cooking over direct medium-high heat. Place the steaks directly over the cooking grate. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes per side for medium rare, or to your desired degree of doneness. Remove to individual serving plates and top each steak with a couple of thin slices of the Cilantro Butter. Let rest for 5 minutes before serving.

Our Tips:

If cooking for a crowd it’s more cost effective to cut your own steaks from whole ribeyes. Try our Domestic Pasture-Raised Boneless Beef Ribeye or Kobe-Style Wagyu Beef Ribeye. Just slice to your desired thicknesses!

D’Artagnan’s Web Admin and Resident-Beer-Guru, Rob, suggests pairing these steaks with your favorite IPA. His choices? Avery Brewing’s IPA or Sixpoint Brewery’s Bengali Tiger or Resin.

Ray Lampe’s compound butter technique of softening the shallots, garlic and cilantro in warm olive oil will work with other herbs as well. Try it with soft, fresh herbs like tarragon, oregano, or dill.

All About Sweetbreads

According to the Larousse Gastronomique, sweetbread is “the culinary term for the thymus gland (in the throat) and the pancreas (near the stomach) in calves, lambs and pigs.” Larousse further states that thymus sweetbreads are “elongated and irregular in shape” while pancreas sweetbreads are “larger and rounded.”

But sweetbreads are neither sweet, nor are they bread. The word “sweetbread” was first used in the 16th century, but the reason behind the name is unknown. Sweet is perhaps used since the thymus is sweeter and richer tasting than muscle flesh. Bread may come from brede “roasted meat,” or is used because bread was another name for morsel.

Southern Fried Sweetbreads Recipe from Gourmet Magazine

Sweetbreads fit into the category of offal, along with other organs, meaning “off-fall” or off-cuts from the carcass of an animal. Sometimes known as variety meats, the heads, tails, and organs of animals have long held a place in European kitchens. In the days before the supermarket (admittedly most of human history) when people butchered their own animals, nothing was wasted from the carcass. Thus many recipes for the nasty bits were created to make the most of these odd, often highly nutritional and tasty cuts. Sweetbreads, aka thymus glands, help young animals fend off disease, and after about six months, they are no longer needed and disappear. So sweetbreads are only found in calves, lambs and kids, with the sweetbreads from milk-fed veal calves being most commonly eaten.

Sweetbreads from New York’s legendary La Grenouille

Offal has always had a cult following in professional kitchens, though less so with home cooks until recent years. Sweetbreads are highly prized by chefs for their mild flavor and tender, creamy texture. They are quite versatile and can be prepared many ways: sautéed, poached, grilled, fried, roasted or braised. Sweetbreads are often supporting stars in pâtés, terrines, sausages, cold appetizers, stews and salads.

Sweetbreads au Monarch by Deana Sidney of the wonderful blog, lostpastremembered

Cooking
However they are cooked, sweetbreads must be soaked in cold water for a minimum of three hours, or even up to 24 hours, to remove any blood. Change the water a few times during the soak. Then blanch the sweetbreads—this makes their texture firmer–bring them to a boil in a pot of water and simmer gently for 5 minutes. Place in ice water to cool quickly and then drain. When they are cool enough to handle, take each sweetbread and pick it over, taking off the fatty, gristly, sinewy bits and veins. The trick is to do this without cutting or removing the membrane, though the membrane is removed in some recipes, so the sweetbreads can still be used if the membrane is accidentally broken.

Traditionally, French and Italian chefs serve sweetbreads in rich, creamy sauces, such as veloute sauce or brown sauce, like Madiera, or truffle sauce. Sweetbreads can be served breaded and fried, or grilled after a night-long soak in buttermilk, sautéed, poached or broiled. In the modern renaissance of offal sweetbreads are increasingly being seen on the menus of the nose-to-tail set.

RECIPE SUGGESTIONS:
Sweetbreads Grenoble
Veal Sweetbreads with Wild Mushrooms
Veal Tenderloin with Sweetbreads in a Carrot Orange Stew

Happy National Fried Chicken Day!

Crispy, crunchy, juicy, tender!

Fried chicken is American comfort food at its best. It’s also a hotly debated topic: pan-fried or deep-fried, flour dredge or cornmeal crust, buttermilk or brine, peanut oil or duck fat?

Whichever method and ingredients you prefer, we can think of no better day to cook up a big batch than National Fried Chicken Day.

Here’s one of our favorite recipes! It’s the version Chef Thomas Keller serves at Ad Hoc, and it’s got a cult-following. And check out our handy how-to on making perfect pan-fried chicken. Bon appetit!

Back of the House/Episode 9: Lamb with Ariane Duarte

Check out the latest episode of Back of the House with ArianeLamb, bam, thank you ma’am! In this quick video, Ariane is cooking our grass-fed lamb and lamb merguez sausage with Chef Ariane Duarte of CulinAriane in Montclair, NJ.

Rack of Lamb with Warm Green Bean Potato Salad

Duckfat Potato Cake with Merguez and Harissa Aioli

Merguez Canapes with Eggplant Caviar

Couscous with Merguez, Fennel and Raisins

Featured Recipe: Buffalo Steak au Poivre

Shake up your weeknight dinner routine with Ariane’s recipe for Buffalo Steak au Poivre. This quick and easy recipe is a fun twist on the classic French bistro staple that is sure to become a family favorite.

Add some crispy duck fat french fries and a bottle of your favorite red wine for a fabulous bistro-style dinner at home. By the way, this technique and basic sauce recipe can be used on traditional beef steak, as well as venison, veal, pork or lamb. Give it a try!

Buffalo Steak au Poivre

Serves 2

Ingredients

2 D’Artagnan Buffalo Buffalo Ribeye Steaks, about 8 oz each

4 tablespoons coarsely-ground black pepper

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

3 ounces Armagnac

6 1/2 ounces D’Artagnan Duck and Veal Demi-Glace

2 tablespoons green peppercorns

6 ounces heavy cream

Salt

Preparation

Pre-heat oven to 425 degrees F.

Season steaks on both sides with salt and coarsely-ground black pepper. Heat vegetable oil in oven-proof skillet over high-flame until smoking.

Sear steaks until brown and crusted on both sides. Put skillet into oven, cook for 4 minutes until medium-rare. Remove steaks from skillet and allow to rest.

Over medium-high heat deglaze the skillet with Armagnac, add demi-glace and reduce by half. Add green peppercorns, heavy cream and cook until sauce is thick enough to coat the back of a spoon. Season to taste with salt.

Remove skillet from heat, add steaks and any drippings. Spoon sauce over steaks.

Serve with duck fat french fries and your favorite bottle of red wine!

On the menu: Easter mains & sides!

So yesterday, we gave you some ideas and recipes for Easter appetizers. (Mmmmm… black truffle gougeres!) Today, we’re all about classic main dishes and comforting, family-friendly sides. We broke our suggestions down into two menus that can also be mixed and matched, if you desire.

Our first menu features Lamb as the centerpiece. Our boneless lamb loin is super easy to prepare and no matter how you cook it, turns out tender and juicy. Tangy spring leeks make the perfect foil to a sweet, truffle honey vinaigrette. We paired the lamb with potatoes roasted in duck fat (our secret weapon!) and rounded out the meal with smoky maitake mushrooms and a crisp bibb lettuce salad.

lamb loin with leeks, duck fat potatoes, bibb salad with radish, maitake mushrooms

Menu #1

Lamb Loin with Leeks and Truffle Honey Vinaigrette

Potatoes Crisped in Duck Fat

Pan Roasted Hen-of-the-Woods Mushrooms

Spring Salad with Peas, Radishes and Creamy Lemon Vinaigrette

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Our second menu shines the light on a perennial Easter favorite, our Applewood Smoked Heritage Hams. We did the work for you – our hand-crafted hams are fully-cooked and need little adornment. We just brushed on a simple glaze made with apricot preserves, mustard and bourbon and heated through. Dried morels give decadent pommes dauphinois an earthy edge, while citrusy green beans and duck fat biscuits finish the table.

glazed ham, duck fat biscuits, citrus tarragon green beans, yukon gold morel mushroom gratin

 Menu #2

Apricot-Bourbon Glazed Applewood Smoked Heritage Ham

Yukon Gold Potato Gratin with Morels

Green Beans with Tarragon and Citrus Butter

Duck Fat Biscuits

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Come back for tomorrow’s post! It’s all about the perfect wines to pair with your Easter feast, with suggestions and tasting notes from one of America’s Top Sommeliers, Anani Lawson of per se in New York City. This is one you do not want to miss.

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