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Posts tagged ‘black truffle butter’

Thanksgivukkah Comes But Once Every 79,000 Years

You’ve surely heard. It’s being touted by the media as a once-in-a-lifetime event. The convergence of the Jewish and Gregorian calendars brings us a hybrid holiday this year: Thanksgivukkah.

Hanukkah falls early this year, with the first night of the Festival of Lights on Wednesday, November 27. And Thanksgiving is later than normal on Thursday, November 28.

So Jewish families will find themselves lighting a menorah after their turkey dinner on the second night of Hanukkah. And that means …

Thanksgivukkah

It might have been called Chanksgiving, but in a frenzy of excitement surrounding this unique holiday, the most common appellation is Thanksgivukkah. Seems it’s the winning hashtag. And once the mayor of Boston said he would proclaim November 28, 2013 “Thanksgivukkah,” the name stuck.

Thanksgivukkah has inspired products like the menurkey, a menorah shaped like a turkey (a nine-year-old kid created it!), t-shirts, cards, and an all-things Thanksgivukkah website. Rabbis have been commenting on it, and Buzzfeed weighed in with a credible mash-up menu for the festival (Manischewitz-brined turkey, anyone?).

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Light your menurkey.

Even satirist Stephen Colbert has commented on the phenomenon with a sketch, and this song parody supplies an anthem for Thanksgivukkah.

We are not falling for the hype…OK, maybe just a little. Come on, it’s not going to happen for another 79,000 or so. Let’s celebrate!

That means food in our book. Our friends at Bon Appetit have been unimpressed with the weird Thanksgivukkah recipes populating the internet, and their post about the worst-ever Thanksgivukkah menu had us chuckling.

So we’re just going to recommend a few of our favorite recipes that are appropriate for the occasion.  You decide how carried away you want to get with it.

First up, cassoulet. Granted, we have a little pork in our recipe (ventrèche is salted pork belly), but this bean and meat stew bears more than a little resemblance to cholent, a slow-cooked bean and meat stew served at countless Sabbath meals over the centuries in Eastern Europe. And with all due respect to kosher laws, the pork really adds something special. Cassoulet would make a perfect centerpiece for a Thanksgivukkah meal.

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Cassoulet serves a crowd.

For a more literal interpretation, try our potato latkes topped with foie gras and apples, which we just posted on the blog here.

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Potato latkes with foie gras

The legs of duck make beautiful confit when slow cooked in their own fat, and when they are shredded…well, we think duck rillettes are one of the most satisfying meat spreads around. Slice a baguette and get a jar of cornichons. Long live the duck fat!

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Duck rillettes

And speaking of confit, garlic can be cooked in duck fat for mellow, tender cloves that are virtually spreadable. We like them in any dish calling for garlic, and love stuffing poultry with the savory tidbits.

Cloves cooked.

Cloves cooked.

Sufganiyot are doughnuts, traditionally eaten because all the oil represents the miracle of the oil that Hanukkah is based upon. We use duck fat in the dough and in the fryer when we make doughnuts. You will agree this is divine once you taste them.  

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Duck fat doughnuts.

Of course, for a smaller gathering on any night of the holiday (Hanukkah lasts eight nights…does that mean Thanksgivukkah does too?) , a de-boned turkey breast that has been slathered with black truffle butter before roasting makes a very satisfying feast.

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Turkey roulade with black truffle butter.

Perhaps our newest product offers the simplest solution. Our Jean Reno Reserve Oil is much like the oil used in the Jewish temple to light the menorah. It is pure and is made using ancient techniques. And you can use it as a finishing oil without much fuss or forceful combining of recipes. It’s a lazy, but elegant solution.

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Celebrate the miracle of the olive oil.

Whatever you eat, however you celebrate it, Thanksgivukkah is the rarest of holidays. Enjoy it!

Duck Fat 50: Ultimate Movie Night Popcorn

Movie night goes glam with this indulgent popcorn, cooked on the stove top. Because it’s so easy to pop this way, and it’s more fun than the microwave.  The duck fat gives it texture and a certain satisfying flavor, but the truffle butter takes it to another level. Serve it family-style, in a large bowl, or go for the in-theatre experience and use individual paper cones. But be warned: this popcorn is addictive.

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INGREDIENTS

  • ½ cup high-quality popcorn kernels
  • 3 tablespoons duck fat
  • 2 tablespoons black truffle oil
  • 3 tablespoons black truffle butter
  • ½ cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated super-fine
  • Big pinch of dried Herbs de Provence
  • Maldon sea salt, to taste

PREPARATION

1. In a small saucepan over medium-low heat, melt truffle butter. Remove from heat, add the truffle oil and set aside.

2.  Heat the duck fat and 1 popcorn kernel, over medium-high heat, in a large pot with a lid. As soon as the kernel pops, add the rest of the popcorn, cover the pot and shake over the heat—quickly moving the pot back and forth over the burner—until the popping stops.

3. Pour half of the popcorn into a large mixing bowl, removing any unpopped kernels. Drizzle half of the butter-oil mixture and sprinkle half of the cheese and herbs over the popcorn, tossing to evenly distribute. Repeat with the rest of popcorn. Season to taste with Malden salt and serve immediately.

Recipe: Black Truffle Butter Gougeres

Classic gougeres are already a cocktail hour favorite, but add our Black Truffle Butter, and they become completely irresistible.  These delectable little puffs pair equally well with champagne or cocktails, making them perfect for aperitif.  We won’t tell how easy they are to make!

Black Truffle Butter Gougeres

Ingredients
1 cup milk
1 cup water
7 tablespoons D’Artagnan Black Truffle Butter
3/4 teaspoon coarse salt
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus 1 tablespoon
1/4 teaspoon D’Artagnan Black Truffle Oil
4 large eggs
1 3/4 cups Gruyère cheese, finely grated
Freshly-ground black pepper, to taste

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Preparation
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line baking sheets with silpat mats or parchment paper; set aside.

2. In a medium pot over medium-high heat, add milk, water, truffle butter and salt. Bring to a boil. Add flour, all at once. Cook, stirring constantly with a wooden spoon, until dough comes together and creates a film on bottom and sides of the pot, 5 to 10 minutes.

3. Remove from heat. Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer with the paddle attachment, allow to cool slightly, about 5 minutes.

4. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing after each addition. Add truffle oil. Finished dough should form peaks that droop over and be smooth and glossy.

5. Drop 1 tablespoon sized balls of dough onto the prepared baking sheets. (1 tbs. sized cookie scoop works well for this, or a spoon + wet fingers. Dough may also be piped with a pastry bag.) Top each gougere with a large pinch of gruyere. Season the gougeres with pepper.

6. Transfer to preheated oven and bake until puffed and golden brown, rotating pan once mid-baking, about 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Featured Recipe: Truffled Hasselback Potatoes with Ham Crisps

Here’s an easy recipe for those chilly nights when cravings run carb heavy. While tasty on their own, Swedish-style Hasselback potatoes are equally delicious alongside roasted meats, such as rack of lamb, venison medallions or beef tenderloin.

Of course our version is slathered in black truffle butter before baking, which lends a subtle earthiness and keeps the interior moist. We crowned each potato with a ham crisp which gives a nice, salty crunch when crumbled over the top.

Truffled Hasselback Potatoes with Ham Crisps

serves 4

Olive oil, as needed

4 russet potatoes, scrubbed clean

Salt & pepper, to taste

4 cloves garlic, sliced paper thin

6 tablespoons D’Artagnan Black Truffle Butter, softened

4 fresh thyme sprigs, leaves chopped

4 slices D’Artagnan Jambon de Bayonne

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Lightly oil a baking dish that’s large enough to hold all 4 potatoes without crowding.

2. Cut the potatoes: Using chopsticks or 2 forks as a knife guide, make several thin slices width-wise without cutting all the way through each potato. Set potatoes in baking dish. Season with salt and pepper.

3. Evenly distribute garlic slices and about half of the thyme in between slices of potatoes. Slather each potato with 1 tablespoon softened truffle butter, stuffing a bit in between some of the slices.

4. Bake the potatoes, uncovered, for 45 minutes to 1 hour, basting with the pan-drippings every so often. Until crisp on the outside yet tender on the inside. If the potatoes look like they’re starting to get too crisped, put a sheet of foil over them in the last 15 minutes of cooking.

5. While the potatoes are baking, make the ham crisps. Heat a medium skillet over medium high heat. Add a little olive oil. Gently lay each slice of jambon in the pan, without touching. Cook until crispy and browned, turning once. Set aside on paper towel.

6. Once baked, carefully remove each potato from the pan using a flat-bottomed spatula or tongs. Garnish with ham crisps and the rest of the chopped thyme. Once plated, top each potato with the remaining truffle butter.

No-Fail Thanksgiving Side! Garlicky Truffle Mashed Potatoes

Here’s a super easy recipe to add to your holiday repertoire – Garlicky Truffle Butter Mashed Potatoes. Last week we gave you the recipe for garlic confit, an indispensable French pantry staple, and talked about the importance of truffle butter. Now we’re bringing it all together in an easy yet impressive recipe. If you’re feeling “extra rich,” as Ariane likes to say, add a flurry of paper thin slices of fresh white truffle upon serving, and watch your guests’ jaws drop.

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Holiday Workhorse: Black Truffle Butter

Black… truffle… butter. The words alone have the power to induce salivation. And while black truffle butter is a year-round kitchen staple, it’s versatility is especially appreciated during the holidays. From passed hors d’oeuvres to plated appetizers and all the way through the main event – truffle butter plays an essential role in our Thanksgiving feast. In this holiday video, Ariane demonstrates how to slide disks of the earthy, creamy concoction under the skin of a turkey before roasting for an out-of-this-world delicious bird.

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