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Posts tagged ‘chef recipes’

Garlic & Black Truffle Mashed Potatoes

This recipe is inspired by the classic Joël Robuchon mashed potato recipe which calls for equal parts potato and butter. Garlic cloves slow-cooked in duck fat are added, along with a generous amount of black truffle butter for intensely earthy and rich potatoes.



2lbs Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks
8-12 tablespoons Black Truffle Butter, more as needed
4 cloves Garlic Confit
Coarse salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Fresh Black Truffle, for shaving (optional)


1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add potatoes. Cook until just fork-tender. You don’t want soggy potatoes.

2. Drain potatoes in a colander and shake well to remove excess water.

3. Place potatoes in a large bowl, add truffle butter and season with salt and pepper. Mash the butter into the potatoes with a masher to desired consistency. They can be as chunky or smooth as you like. Alternatively, you can pass the potatoes through a ricer and then mix in butter and garlic confit, making sure to mash garlic into potatoes with back of spoon. Adjust seasoning and top with thinly-shaved black truffle. Serve.

All About Muscovy Duck

The Muscovy duck (Cairina moschataoriginated in the warm region of South America, and although a tropical bird, can adapt to cold weather conditions down to 10°F without ill effects. This recommended it to domestication in North America, and also made possible flocks of feral ducks in parks. Muscovy ducks are brown-black in color, with some pale wing coloration, but many of the domesticated ducks have been bred for white feathers.

The drake, or male, grows from 12 to 15 pounds though the hen, or female, is much smaller, weighing from 8 to 10 pounds. Both have what is called a caruncle – a fleshy, bulbous growth- on the head. This is a breed distinctive trait. They are also quiet ducks – the male makes a low hissing sound, not a full quack, and the females makes a short, weak quack called a pip, which sounds like a flute.

Muscovies are excellent fliers and like perching in trees, aided by sharp claws on their webbed feet. And they like to eat mosquitoes, spiders, slugs and bugs of all kinds, which makes them an ideal addition to a poultry barnyard.

Sometimes called Barbarie or Barbary duck, the Muscovy duck is thin-skinned, low in fat, and has deep red, mildly gamy meat which is sometimes compared to roast beef for its flavor, and veal for its tenderness. There’s also much more of it. The carcass of a Muscovy duck is heavier than most other domestic ducks, and has a larger breast that its Pekin counterpart, with up to 40% less fat than that breed. And while it may appear to cost more per pound than other ducks, Muscovy duck has a higher meat to bone ratio, which means you are getting more meat and less bone for the money!

And being so lean, the meat renders out less fat in cooking. Muscovy ducks have less fat and less calories per pound than turkey. All of this contributes to a flavorful and healthy eating experience. Europeans have been enjoying the Muscovy duck meat for a long time, and the popularity of this duck is growing in the United States.

D’Artagnan’s Muscovy ducks are raised without any growth hormones, steroids or antibiotics on a farm in California’s sunny, dry San Joaquin Valley by a producer that has been breeding ducks for more than 35 years. The ducks are fed a diet of corn, soy, wheat and alfalfa and are left to grow in open barns for up to ninety days, which means that they develop a meaty, full-flavored breast.

Recipe Suggestions:
Duck Civet
Double Duck Breast with Baked Figs and Duck Liver Toasts
Seared Muscovy Duck Breast with Marsala Orange Sauce with Red Currants
Smoked Muscovy Duck Breast, Tosaka Seaweed, Foie Gras Toast, Cherry Leaf Vinaigrette