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Posts tagged ‘dartagnan foods’

Duck Fat 50: Oven-Roasted Veggie Fries

If you like potatoes with duck fat, you’ll love these. Gorgeous roasted vegetable “fries” get extra flavor and color from a swath of luscious duck fat right before baking. Delicious as a side dish or chilly day snack.Recipe_Oven_Veggie_Fries_HomeMedium (1)

Ingredients

Assorted root veggies, such as parsnips, turnips, carrots, and beets; scrubbed, peeled and cut into ¼ inch sticks
Duck fat, softened
Coarse salt
Finely chopped parsley (optional)

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

2. In a large bowl, toss veggie sticks with a few generous drizzles of with a drizzle of duck fat. Make sure each stick is evenly shiny with fat. Season with salt.

3. Spread evenly, in a single layer, on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake until golden brown and cooked through, flipping halfway through baking time. Fries should take about 15-25 minutes.

4. Remove from oven, taste for seasoning and season with salt if needed. Sprinkle with parsley (if using), and serve immediately.

Secret Ingredient: Demi-Glace

Our Secret Ingredients series shines a light on products that make all the difference when cooking with D’Artagnan.

Demi-glace is one of those things that professional chefs know about and home cooks need to discover. For sauces, there is nothing better. Braising liquid fortified with demi-glace is a miracle. Added to soups, bean dishes and yes, mushroom or vegetable sautés, demi-glace is the secret sauce.

Don’t get caught without demi-glace in the freezer.

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Secret ingredient bonus: pictured is our duck and veal demi-glace. For those more beefy dishes, try our veal demi-glace.

 

Favorite Side Dishes for Thanksgiving

This week we are offering 15% off holiday essentials – we think of them as the “little helpers” to ease you through this year’s holiday meal and make it extra-special. Things like black truffle butter, duck fat, demi-glace and bacon. Imported French chestnuts and porcini powder bring earthy flavor and umami to recipes like classic stuffing. Speaking of which, maybe your stuffing needs a little foie gras this year. These cubes of flash-frozen foie gras are quite handy at the holidays.

For further inspiration, here are a few of our favorite things to make for the Thanksgiving meal. Just click on the photo for the recipe.

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Recipe_Game_Sausage_stuffed_Mushrooms_CAPT

D'Artagnan Food products

Recipe_Tamari_Mushrooms_Bromberg CAPTIONED

Recipe_Brioche_Apple_Stuffing_CAPT

mushroompudding CAPT

 

Thank a Farmer on World Food Day

World Food Day started on October 16, 1979, to celebrate the founding of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in 1945.

This year the UN General Assembly designated 2014 as the “International Year of Family Farming.”  They are focusing world attention on the role that family farming plays in supporting global agriculture and in eradicating hunger and poverty.

On World Food Day, we join with millions of others to salute family farmers and ranchers for the work they do. They truly are “Feeding the World, Caring for the Earth.”

World Food Day

Friends & Family Sale!

Buy whatever you like at dartagnan.com and take 15% off with promo code FRIENDS14 for 3 days … beginning NOW!

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Save on Fall Faves

We are always sad to see summer go, but there is a certain pleasure in the arrival of autumn. It means going back to the kitchen and the comfort food techniques we love: roasting, simmering and braising. It’s time to get cozy and get cooking.

So we’re kicking it off today with 15% off our favorite meats for fall. Stock up and and plan ahead for kitchen victory.  Dust off the slow cooker, and bring on the braise.

Shop and save until Sunday 9/28 – the sale ends at midnight EST.

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Fast Company’s 100 Most Creative People of 2014

We are excited to announce that Ariane made the list at number 86 – Fast Company recognized her for “growing while staying rooted.”

It’s a huge honor to be included on this list of innovators and creative geniuses. Ariane has worked for 30 years to make something old – heritage breed animals raised with care  and compassion – something new again.

We are also thrilled to see our friend Chef April Bloomfield make the list. Big congratulations to all the worthies on the 2014 list!

Image from Fast Company

Image from Fast Company

A Customer Appreciation Sale!

We’re having a sale in your honor! It’s our way of showing appreciation for your loyalty. Take 15% off everything and anything at dartagnan.com from April 22 through April 24, 2014.

Just remember to use the promo code THANKS at checkout. Enjoy!

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Be sure to come visit us on Facebook. And maybe even share photos of what you do with D’Artagnan products. We love to see what’s cooking!

Ideas for Edible Holiday Gifts

Edible holiday gifts, made lovingly by hand, are often times the most appreciated. Not only a delightful gesture, rolling up your sleeves and getting messy in the kitchen can be a lot of fun. Plus, it’s a great way to check multiple people off of your gift list in one fell swoop. Here are our picks for delicious holiday gifts using our products.

biscochitos

1. Duckfat Biscochitos   

A traditional sugar cookie made with lard, biscochitos are a Christmas staple in the American Southwest. But the orange and fennel flavor reminds us more of Southwest France. So we had to create a version that uses our duckfat, bien sur! A duck-shaped cookie cutter gives a little extra D’Artagnan flair.

foiebutter

2. Foie Gras Butter   

This decadent treat will impress even the most die-hard foodies on your gift list. They don’t have to know how easy it is to make!

brittle

3. Pig Brittle 

Sweet, salty and smoky, this crunchy candy is generously studded with our applewood-smoked bacon and toasted pecans.  Just be warned – not only is Pig Brittle delicious, it’s addicting! Once your recipients taste it, it’ll be requested year after year.

garlic confit

4. Garlic Confit

A cooking staple in Gascon cooking, garlic confit is the gift that will keep on giving long after the holidays are over. Plump garlic cloves are gently cooked in duckfat until meltingly tender. Kept in the fridge, the confit will keep for up to a year (although it never lasts that long…). Cloves can be added to all kinds of recipes from sauces to braises to roasts.

rillettes

5. Rillettes

We are firm believers simple pleasures, our duck rillettes are made with duck, aromatic vegetables, herbs and little else. A small pot of this unctuous, meaty spread makes a wonderful gift, especially when paired with a crusty baguette!

Packaging

Of course an edible D’Artagnan gift should be presented with panache!

Rillettes, Foie Gras Butter and Garlic Confit should be packaged in non-reactive glass or ceramic jars that can be refrigerated, such as Weck Canning Jars or Le Creuset Mini Cocottes. We like tying gift tags on jars with festive red & white bakers string.

Pig Brittle and Duckfat Biscochitos can be left at room temp so the packaging possibilities are endless! Two of our favorite sites for packaging ideas and supplies are Cakegirls and Garnish. Check them out – both shops have a great selection and wonderful blogs full of creative ideas for packaging edibles.

All About Capon

A capon is a male chicken that is gelded, or castrated, at a young age, and then fed a rich diet of milk or porridge until it reaches 6 to 12 pounds, between the age of 5 and 6 months. The flesh is very white and, unlike that of other chickens, marbled with fat. Larger than a chicken, a bit smaller than a turkey, but more flavorful than either, capons are full breasted with tender, juicy, flavorful meat that is well suited to roasting.

They tend to taste less gamy than an intact rooster would, and yield moist tender meat with high fat content. Because of its size, the capon is a good choice to feed a dinner party, or even a small Thanksgiving gathering in place of turkey.

Caponization is done either by surgical removal of the testes, or, as some factory poultry producers prefer, by estrogen implants. Capons that are labeled “all natural” have been surgically caponized. Because of the loss of sex hormones, the normally aggressive barnyard rooster becomes a docile, mellow creature. Capons can be housed together as they will not fight for dominance, which makes the process of raising them a lot easier on the farmer. Capons are less active because of the neutralization of sex hormones so their flesh does not become tough and muscled but instead is fatty and tender. Other physical changes to a capon include a smaller head, comb and wattle.

History
While humankind has been eating chicken for a long time—at least since 4000 BC in Asia—the capon’s history is a bit murkier. When it was first decided to castrate a young male chicken and then fatten it up is open for debate, but some lay it at the doorstep of the Romans. A law was passed during a period of drought (162 BC) forbidding the fattening of hens, as it was deemed a waste of precious grain. Wily breeders skirted the letter of the law by instead castrating roosters and fattening them for sale, though these capons were much larger than hens, so they must have eaten plenty of grain. The name “capon” comes from the Latin “capo,” meaning “cut.” Through the Middle Ages, capons were especially popular with the clergy and kings, and thus popularized throughout Europe, where capon was stuffed, roasted, stewed and baked into pies. In present-day France and Italy, capons are traditionally served at Christmas.

Cooking
Capons require longer cooking times than typical chickens because of their larger size. Roasting capons at lower temperatures helps bring out the flavor, but also adds to the cooking time. As a general rule, a capon should be roasted for 17 minutes per pound, so a 10 lb. bird would require a total roasting time of just under 3 hours. The poultry is done when a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the capon’s thigh reads 165 degrees or the juices run clear. Whether poached or stuffed and roasted, capons offer rich taste and lots of meat to go around the table.

RECIPE SUGGESTIONS:
Roasted Capon with Chestnut Honey
Capon Poule au Pot with Foie Gras Stuffing
Capon with Mango Glaze
Roasted Capon with Mushroom Truffle Stuffing
Roasted Capon with Cognac Mushroom Sauce
Sweet Chestnut Stuffed Capon