Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘d’artagnan recipe’

Saucy Series IX: Cumberland

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Cumberland Sauce

Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne were giants of the American stage from the 1920s to 1960. They were also legendary entertainers at their home in Manhattan but mostly in Genesee Depot, Wisconsin. All of the greats of stage and screen dropped by their out-of-the-way farm for R&R. Everyone loved it. Fontanne was the perfect hostess and Lunt the master chef. After retiring from the stage, Lunt even got a Cordon Bleu degree and wrote a cookbook that was published after his death by the foundation that took over the house. It is chock full of amazing recipes, all the more so when you think that the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Lawrence Olivier, Noel Coward and Joan Crawford enjoyed them at one time or another.

Cumberland at table

I loved the book and its stories and photos but fell in love with his take on Cumberland Sauce. I LOVE Cumberland Sauce and couldn’t leave it off my Sauce Series list. It is a classic game sauce that has been around in one form or another for a hundred years. Although named after the Duke of Cumberland and thought to be thoroughly English, it has its roots in Germany. Lunt adds a touch of magic in his version with the addition of a bit of horseradish. Best I ever tasted. Although I have always associated it with venison, it would be great with any pork (chops, loin, tenderloin or even sausage or ham) or a game bird (duck to grouse and pigeon) and even would work for vegetarians because it is amazing on sweet potatoes (sans the demi-glace).

IMG

If you like venison, run, do not walk to D’Artagnan for the best venison tenderloin ever. It’s butter tender and full of flavor –– I made it rare and loved it that way. It is also extremely lean, so best not to cook it too much. The sweet and savory combination with a bit of heat from the horseradish and cayenne is masterful and you understand why this sauce has been a favorite for generations (something like it has been used since at least the 18th century). The best part? It takes about 15 minutes to make and can be done ahead of time. That means a world-class dinner could be ready in 1/2 an hour. It’s low in fat and high in flavor, how cool is that?

Cumberland 3

Venison Tenderloin with Cumberland Sauce (serves 3-4)

2 venison tenderloins from D’Artagnan
1 c red wine
2 t juniper berries
1 t salt
1 t pepper
1 bay leaf
1 t dry thyme
2 T butter or oil
Cumberland sauce
Steamed sweet potato (a squeeze of orange is great on them)
sautéed spinach

Combine the wine and spices and marinate the venison overnight. Remove from the fridge. Dry the meat and heat the oil in a skillet. Add the meat and sear on all sides. Cook for about 5 more minutes for rare. Tent for 5 minutes, slice and serve with Cumberland sauce and sweet potato and spinach.

Cumberland 1

Alfred Lunt’s Cumberland Sauce (serves 4)

1 t chopped shallot
1 T orange peel in fine julienne
1 T lemon peel in fine julienne
¼ c port
2 T D’Artagnan demi-glace (optional)
1/3 c currant jelly
juice of 1 orange
juice of ½ lemon
½ t dry English mustard
dash of cayenne
1 t freshly grated horseradish with 1 t sherry vinegar or 1 t prepared horseradish*

Boil shallots for 2 minutes in a little water and strain and reserve. Do the same with the lemon and orange peels. Melt the currant jelly and add the peels and shallots. Reduce till thickened and serve warm or at room temperature.

*I am kind of crazy about horseradish so I added a bit more after the sauce had cooked for extra kick.

Cumberland 2

Featured Recipe: Wagyu Shepherd’s Pie

Why not elevate the homey cottage pie with ground Wagyu beef and a truffle butter mashed potato crust? Equal parts comfort food and haute cuisine, this is a pie to savor. Serve with a pint of pale ale or dry stout for a bit of “pub grub” authenticity.

shepherdspie

Ingredients

4 pounds Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and quartered
1 tablespoon salt, plus more to taste
1 1/2 cups cream (or milk)
5 tablespoons D’Artagnan Black Truffle Butter
Freshly-ground black pepper, to taste
2 pounds D’Artagnan Kobe-Style Ground Wagyu Beef
1 large onion, minced
1 clove garlic, minced
2 carrots, diced
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon unsweetened cocoa powder
1 cup peas
1/2 container D’Artagnan Veal Demi-Glace, dissolved with 1/2 cup hot water
1/2 cup red wine

 Preparation 

  1. Place potatoes in a large pot, cover with cold water, add 1 tablespoon salt. Heat over medium-high flame until simmering. Cook until a fork slips in and out easily. Drain potatoes then transfer to the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until lumps are gone, about 2 minutes. Add 3 tablespoons black truffle butter, mix until blended. Turn mixer down to low speed. Add cream, salt and pepper to taste, and nutmeg. Do not over mix. Cover with foil, set aside.
  2. Heat a large Dutch-oven or other heavy pot over medium-high flame. Add ground Wagyu beef, cook, breaking up meat with a spoon or spatula until evenly browned and no longer pink. Remove meat with a spotted spoon and set aside. Drain off all but about 2 tablespoons of fat.
  3. Place pot over medium heat. Add onion, garlic and carrot. Cook, stirring up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until softened, about 7 minutes. Add beef back to the pot. Add tomato paste, mustard and cocoa powder, stirring well to combine. Stir in peas. Add red wine and demi-glace mixture. Again, stir up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Bring to a simmer, turn heat down to low. Maintain simmer until most liquid is evaporated and mixture reaches a thick, saucy consistency, about 20 minutes.
  4. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 425 degrees F.
  5. Transfer meat mixture to a large baking dish. Spoon mashed potatoes over the top and evenly smooth over the meat using an off-set spatula. Use a fork to make an attractive swirled pattern on the top of the potatoes. Brush with melted truffle butter. Bake until top is golden brown, about 15 – 20 minutes.

Tournedos Rossini, A Legendary Recipe

The origins of this dish can be traced back to the relationship between legendary chef Marie-Antoine Carême and the composer Rossini, a known gourmand. Evidently Rossini insisted on the dish being prepared tableside so he could micromanage its creation, and when the chef objected to the interference, Rossini said, “So, turn your back.”  Whether that is true or not, this recipe bears his name, and it is as decadent, rich and satisfying today as it was when Rossini demanded it his way. Though it’s fairly easy to make, the ingredients are luxurious enough to make this a special-occasion meal. tournedos rossini1 INGREDIENTS

 PREPARATION 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Butter 2 large ramekins. Cover the bottom of each ramekin with potato slices, brush with softened truffle butter and add another layer of potato. Repeat until all potatoes are used. Weigh down each potato cake with a smaller ramekin, then bake in the oven until edges are crisp and the center is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Using an offset spatula, remove potato cakes to paper toweling. 2. In a small bowl, combine the demi-glace, truffle juice and chopped truffles, set aside. 3. Season filets with salt & pepper. In a large skillet over medium heat. Melt the duck fat in a large skillet over medium-high flame. Sear the filets until desired doneness, about 5 minutes each side for medium-rare. Remove to a cutting board to rest, tent with foil to keep warm. 4. Discard all fat from the skillet. While the pan is still hot, add the Madeira, scraping up all the beefy bits on the bottom. Add the demi-glace mixture, cook until reduced, then remove from heat and stir in the truffle butter. Taste for seasoning and add salt & pepper, if necessary. Keep warm. 5. Heat a small, dry skillet over high flame. When hot, sear the foie gras slices until golden brown, about 60 seconds on each side. Remove to paper toweling. 6. On each of two plates, place the potato cake in the center and top with the filet mignon then foie gras. Spoon the sauce over and around. Top with freshly shaved truffle.  

Roast Gala Goose Recipe

Forget your fear of flabby, greasy goose! This do-ahead method produces a succulent, flavorful bird with crispy skin. After poaching, only a half-hour of high-heat roasting is needed before serving.  It’s a classic and perfect centerpiece for a Christmas meal and should serve six.

Recipe_Gala_Goose_HomeMedium

Ingredients

One 9 to 11lb goose
3 tablespoons rendered goose fat
1½ cups each coarsely chopped carrots, onions, and celery
6 tablespoons all-purpose flour
4 cups chicken stock
2 cups dry white wine
4 sprigs flat-leaf parsley
Peelings from 1 green apple (optional)
6 cloves
1 large bay leaf
1 ounce dried porcini mushrooms, soaked, cleaned, and coarsely chopped, liquid strained and reserved
½ cup dried cherries
2 tablespoons Armagnac
1 tablespoon red currant jelly
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Preparation

  1. Remove giblets and neck from cavity, pull off any loose fat, and cut off first 2 wing joints, if still attached, and reserve. Wash goose, tie legs together, pick bird all over, and set aside.
  2. Put goose fat in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat, and render about 3 tablespoons of fat. Remove and discard remaining fat (or use later). Add giblets, wing pieces, neck, and vegetables to pan. Sauté until vegetables are browned, about 7 to 8 minutes, turning frequently. Sprinkle on flour, adjust heat to medium, and continue cooking until flour is lightly browned, 6 to 7 minutes, stirring often.
  3. Pour chicken stock and white wine into a covered roasting dish large enough to hold the goose, and bring to a boil. Add goose, breast side down, pieces of browned goose, and vegetables, parsley, apple peelings, cloves, and bay leaf. Pour in enough water to cover goose by about two-thirds, and bring to a simmer. Whisk a cup of this liquid into the sauté pan, then scrape the thickened liquid back into the roasting pan.
  4. Cover pan and cook very gently, regulating heat, if necessary, to keep it just simmering.
  5. After an hour, turn goose over, being careful not to break the skin. (A pair of rubber gloves is an easy way to do this.) Poach goose a total of 2 to 3 hours, or until meat is tender when pierced with a fork. Turn off heat and finish immediately, later in the day, or the next day.
  6. Recipe may be done ahead to this point.
  7. To finish immediately, preheat oven to 450° F.
  8. Remove goose from liquid, drain, and place on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Roast until skin is brown and crispy, about 30 minutes. Take out of oven, and allow to stand for about 5 to 20 minutes.
  9. Meanwhile, skim grease from pan liquid and strain to remove pieces of goose, vegetables, and seasonings. Discard pieces of goose and seasonings. Purée vegetables in a blender or food processor, and add back to pan. Boil quickly to reduce liquid by about half.
  10. Add porcini and soaking liquid, cherries, Armagnac, and red currant jelly. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and keep warm until needed.
  11. To finish later or the next day, cover pan and set in refrigerator. When ready, remove layer of fat from liquid. Lift out goose and bring liquid to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat to a simmer, then reheat goose in stock for about 10 minutes while preheating oven. Proceed with recipe as above.

Duck Fat 50: Ultimate Movie Night Popcorn

Movie night goes glam with this indulgent popcorn, cooked on the stove top. Because it’s so easy to pop this way, and it’s more fun than the microwave.  The duck fat gives it texture and a certain satisfying flavor, but the truffle butter takes it to another level. Serve it family-style, in a large bowl, or go for the in-theatre experience and use individual paper cones. But be warned: this popcorn is addictive.

Recipe_Truffle_Butter_Popcorn_HomeMedium

INGREDIENTS

  • ½ cup high-quality popcorn kernels
  • 3 tablespoons duck fat
  • 2 tablespoons black truffle oil
  • 3 tablespoons black truffle butter
  • ½ cup Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, grated super-fine
  • Big pinch of dried Herbs de Provence
  • Maldon sea salt, to taste

PREPARATION

1. In a small saucepan over medium-low heat, melt truffle butter. Remove from heat, add the truffle oil and set aside.

2.  Heat the duck fat and 1 popcorn kernel, over medium-high heat, in a large pot with a lid. As soon as the kernel pops, add the rest of the popcorn, cover the pot and shake over the heat—quickly moving the pot back and forth over the burner—until the popping stops.

3. Pour half of the popcorn into a large mixing bowl, removing any unpopped kernels. Drizzle half of the butter-oil mixture and sprinkle half of the cheese and herbs over the popcorn, tossing to evenly distribute. Repeat with the rest of popcorn. Season to taste with Malden salt and serve immediately.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 5,226 other followers