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Posts tagged ‘d’artagnan’

What is the Paleo Diet?

The Paleo diet has been coming out of the cave and into the mainstream over the past few years. This return to pre-agricultural eating has its detractors and supporters, like any dietary trend. But in a world where people seem to be eating themselves to death with processed foods, the Paleo Diet encourages a return to real foods that our primal ancestors would have eaten. If it’s a trend, it’s the oldest one around.

Dr. Loren Cordain, Phd., who is the founder of the Paleolithic movement, and in fact coined the term “Paleo Diet,” explains the simple premise of the Paleo lifestyle.


At the most basic, a Paleo lifestyle returns us to our ancestral diet – what we would have hunted and gathered: meats, fish, greens, fruits, seeds and nuts. It’s an unusual diet in that it bucks many established verities, such as the dangers of saturated fats and the desirability of grains. Humans in the Paleolithic era would not have counted calories, or found any low-fat, processed diet foods in the store. Intent on survival, they would have eaten all the saturated fats and nutrient-dense foods they could get their hands on.

The modern-day followersof Paleo do the same. They revel in eating pastured pork and poultry, grass-fed beef and grass-fed lamb (because animals wouldn’t have eaten grains either), game meats and game birds and offal. These proteins are balanced with natural fats, vegetables and small amounts of fruit and nuts.Paleo Meat Strip

So what does the diet eliminate? Noticeably absent are all grains and legumes, which came along later in our evolution, during the agricultural age over the past 10,000 years. Grains and legumes are understood to be harmful, because we have not yet evolved to digest them and absorb the nutrients in foods introduced during the agricultural era of human history.

The Paleo Diet also eliminates dairy and refined sugar, as well as hydrogenated vegetable oils like canola, margarine and soybean oil. All of these are either late additions to the human diet, or processed replacements for products from nature, such as animal fats and olive, coconut or avocado oils.

The Paleo Diet is not an attempt to accurately reenact the diet of cavemen, or return modern people to the Stone Age. Instead, it is a return to simple, unprocessed foods, made at home with real ingredients. The followers of Paleo Diet feel that many chronic health issues are the result of the modern diet, which relies heavily on many of the processed items listed above.


A basic Paleo plan encourages people to exercise moderately, sleep deeply and in sync with the setting sun, following natural Circadian rhythms, and to eliminate external stress. This Paleo Diet 101 from Paleo Leap is a good place to start with the essentials.

It may well be an effort to follow this kind of eating plan in the modern world. But when you look at the ingredients of the packaged food in most stores and realize how far from a natural diet we have come, perhaps a return to simpler times makes sense. Many people are reporting health benefits, such as weight loss, improved immune function and increased energy on the Paleo plan.

And if you think a Paleo approach means you will be eating dull meals, take a look at Simply That Paleo Guy’s blog for meaty inspiration, like this photo, encouragement and dietary guidelines.

paleo dinner

While not all D’Artagnan products fit the Paleo plan, many of them are perfect for those exploring this primal dietary path. From wild boar and venison to game sausage made without dairy, additives or preservatives, we have plenty of premium protein – the cornerstone of a good Paleo diet.

Fiery Goa Pork Vindaloo

Cherie Scott 2Welcome guest blogger Cherie Scott, who made the improbable journey from her birth place in India to a small town in Maine (with stops in Vancouver and New York City), where she now writes her aptly-named blog Mumbai to Maine. There she reconnects with her Indian-Portuguese roots through family recipes and nostalgic anecdotes – it’s a culinary journey across cultures and the Atlantic.

I was only 6 when I tried my first pork vindaloo. I will never forget that first bite: the tart but tender pork made my mouth pucker as my eyes widened in pleasant surprise. It was truly the first culinary roller coaster ride in my mouth. I had to have more!

As a little girl, I thought of vindaloo as a grown-up dish. The flavors were intense. I never questioned what went in it to make it so delicious. I just ate multiple helpings of it as my mother recalls. But over the years, I’ve developed a curiosity about its origins and what gave this signature Indo-Portuguese dish a special spot in my mother’s culinary repertoire.

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12-hour SALE today!

It’s a FLASH sale! Save 30% off a wide selection of favorites today only at


All offers valid while supplies last on new orders placed during the sale period listed above. Freezer Sale offers may not be combined with other promotions.

12-Hour Sale on Foie Gras

Some people remember that July 1, 2012 was the day the California ban on foie gras went into effect. Of course, that ill-conceived law was overturned on January 7, 2015, to much rejoicing and popping of champagne corks. We traditionally mark the day with a special on foie gras.

So for you lovers of the good stuff, it’s time to enjoy with abandon.  And to encourage you, all foie gras is 20% off at for 12 hours only.


D’Artagnan Chorizo and Maine Little Neck Clams in a Spicy Seafood Broth


Welcome guest blogger Cherie Scott, who made the improbable journey from her birth place in India to a small town in Maine (with stops in Vancouver and New York City), where she now writes her aptly-named blog Mumbai to Maine. There she reconnects with her Indian-Portuguese roots through family recipes and nostalgic anecdotes – it’s a culinary journey across cultures and the Atlantic.

Cherie Scott 2

I came up with this tasty dish as I was driving my daughter to school one morning. As a full-time working mom I always struggle with having to make quick but delicious meals for my husband and daughter. We are all starving when we get home from work and after-school activities. I feel the pressure to deliver dinner with flare and flavor. Over the years, I’ve learned that a well-stocked pantry and fridge are truly my best friends in the kitchen! And, it’s comforting to know that I can come home to them and they always make me feel like a fabulous gourmet chef.

I had a package of D’Artagnan chorizo in my fridge and I knew it would pair well with seafood – my Portuguese roots always re-surface when I’m on the spot!

On my way back to work after dropping off my daughter I noticed a sign on the road: Little Neck Clams $3.99/lb. What goes better with chorizo then fresh clams? I could almost picture myself opening up the package of the chorizo, bursting with fresh garlic, paprika and perfectly seasoned pork waiting to rub shoulders with those fresh briny clams.Clams & chorizo 4

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Father’s Day Special – Includes Chicken Wings!

Along with juicy wagyu patties, rack of lamb, giant steaks,  all kinds of sausage and Berkshire pork (ribs and chops!), our favorites for Father’s Day are now 20% off –  but only until Wednesday, 6/17.


And we are introducing a new product just in time for Dad’s day: organic, air-chilled chicken wings!

Our fabulous, organic whole chicken has always been a popular bird, and we know you will love the parts. After all, everyone loves nibbling on wings. Even some of our French chef friends serve an homage to the classic recipe, complete with hot sauce and blue cheese.

We like to make “truffalo” wings – our oven-baked version of the famous Buffalo chicken wings, by swapping black truffle butter for regular butter. We think Frank’s Red Hot Sauce is a must for the sauce (some things are sacred), and recommend that you be generous with the butter.

Truffalo Wings 5

Those black specks are bits of truffle, not black pepper.

But you don’t have to stop there. We whipped up two more recipes for those who want to try something different. This harissa-honey chicken wing recipe starts on the grill for a smoky, spicy kick. The sauce goes on last, to keep the honey from burning on the grates.


Serve with yogurt sauce and other Middle Eastern favorites to make a meal.

Our fried Asian-style wings recipe has sweet chili sauce to balance the heat of sambal oelek (or your favorite chile sauce). One of the benefits of making wings at home is that you control all the ingredients. If you want to eat “fast food,” we think it’s best to make it yourself.


Crispy, crunchy, sweet and spicy, these wings have it all.

Try our organic chicken wings, available in 1-pound tray packs (in a case of 4) or in bulk (2 bags, 5 pounds each) for a simple home treat, or your next gathering, whether for the game or a backyard party. And save 20% right now in our Father’s Day special.


FLASH SALE – Today Only!

With beef cuts and lamb, venison and wild boar, as well as our exclusive Green Circle Chicken and Rohan duck, this flash sale has some of our favorites at up to 40% off. FB_JuneFlash*This limited-time offer is valid Tuesday 6/9/15 from 9:00 am to 9:00 pm EST. Offer may not be combined with membership discount and is not valid on pending or prior purchases. Offer applies to product purchase only, before shipping and handling. Valid on select products, while supplies last.


Buy More, Save More!

Stock up on all of your D’Artagnan favorites for the grill and beyond!


*This limited-time offer ends 11:59pm EST, Thursday, 6/4/15. Discount may not be combined with any other offer and is not valid on pending or prior purchases or toward the purchase of Gift Certificates or Value Club Memberships. Offer applies to product purchase only, before shipping and handling; standard shipping charges will be applied.

Ideas for Leftover Ham

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. For the in-depth story on the inspiration for the mousse, plus lots of historic photos, visit her blog.  

I abhor wasting food, so I was thrilled when one of our finest chefs, Dan Barber of Stone Barns, opened a 2-week pop-up restaurant in NYC recently called WastED with an eye to changing the conversation about what gets tossed.

Here, for $15 a plate, diners were treated to bruised vegetables, imperfect fruit, fried skate bones and odd animal parts that were often tossed. Things like cauliflower hearts, broccoli and kale stems, even juice pulp was pressed to make ‘hamburgers’ –– all found great new roles at the table. Diners were not disappointed. A bit of ingenuity and cooking talent turned waste into delicious food. If you turn your mind to it, aprés-holiday dinners provide the perfect opportunity for letting nothing go to waste and making many great meals instead of turning into science experiments in the fridge. It also gives a great deal of satisfaction to know that you are fighting the statistics –– up to 40% of our food is thrown away each year.

We all know the after-holiday challenge. The holiday is over and your fridge is stuffed to the gills with leftovers. I spend more time scouring the web for recipes for leftovers than I do making the dinner in the first place. And that makes sense. A good piece of ham can provide many meals to follow – from the redo of the first dinner, to sandwiches, scalloped potatoes and ham-bone-flavored pea soup with the last little bits.

When dinner is done, the leftover pâté, meat, gravy, cream and stock can fairly quickly become fabulous meals and snacks. Even the sliced stale bread can be toasted for your mousse, and stale rolls buttered and toasted for deviled ham.

For these tasty dishes, leftovers can be used easily. Should you not have gravy, a velouté is quick to make as is aspic and great for lunches with a salad or snacks on their own.

Deana Ham Pic 1

Ham Mousse Alsacienne (based on Escoffier’s recipe)

½ pound D’Artagnan applewood smoked ham, skin removed and roughly chopped
1/3 cup velouté or meat gravy
½ c aspic (recipe follows)
2/3 cup heavy cream, whipped
½ to 1 teaspoon Escoffier spice mix (recipe follows)
salt to taste (some ham is very salty so you may not need it)
½ to 1 cup D’Artagnan foie gras medallions with truffles (depending on size of your mold)

Put the ham in a food processor and process till finely chopped. Add ¼ c of the aspic, the velouté and the heavy cream with the spice mix. Process till smooth. Taste for seasoning and spread smoothly in a dish. Chill. While this is chilling, take the foie gras and put into a mold. Put into the freezer for about 20 minutes. Take the ham mousse out of the fridge. Warm the mold with your hands or a hot towel and then tap the foie gras onto parchment — smooth any rough bits. Use a wide spatula and place on the ham mousse. Pour the remaining aspic over the mousse. It will just cover the molded foie and pool on the ham mousse. Chill until the aspic is set and serve with cornichons, mustard, green peppercorns and bread or toast.


1 cup of chicken stock
1 package of gelatin
1 egg white and shell
salt to taste
1 tablespoon Madeira

Put ¼ c stock in a pan and warm and add the gelatin. Stir till dissolved. Add the rest of the stock, the egg and the shell, stir and simmer for 15 minutes. Pour the stock and egg through 2 thicknesses of cheesecloth. DO NOT SQUEEZE. Just let the stock drip to keep it clear. Add the Madeira and reserve.

* If you don’t want to make aspic, you should add 1T Madeira to the ham mousse. The aspic is delicious though so I do encourage the extra step.


1 tablespoon butter
1 tablespoon flour
1 cup stock
2 mushrooms, chopped (optional)
pinch of salt to taste

Put the butter and flour in the pan and cook for a few minutes, add the stock slowly, stirring until all the stock is added. Put the mushrooms in the velouté and simmer at very low heat for 15-20 minutes. Strain.

Escoffier Spice Mix

1 bay leaf
3 pinches thyme
3 pinches coriander
4 pinches cinnamon
6 pinches nutmeg
4 pinches cloves
3 pinches ginger
3 pinches mace
10 pinches pepper
1 pinch cayenne

Blend all in a spice grinder or mash the bay leaf and blend with the rest.

Deana Ham Pic 2

And here is another leftover ham recipe – it’s very simple to do and lovely to eat. Serve on crackers, flat bread, a slice of baguette, or a toasted stale roll.

Deviled Ham

1/3 cup minced onion
¼ cup butter
1 tablespoon dry mustard
1 tablespoon flour
hefty pinch cayenne
1 cup scalded cream (you may want to add more after you chill it if it isn’t creamy enough)
2 cup ground D’Artagnan applewood smoked ham, skin removed and roughly chopped
2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon freshly grated horseradish (or bottled) or to taste (I added 2 tablespoons because I love horseradish)
2 teaspoon white wine vinegar if you are using freshly grated horseradish
Salt & pepper to taste

Pickle relish, sweet pickle or sour cornichons to serve (optional)
watercress (optional)

Sauté onion in butter till soft. Add the mustard and flour and make a roux. Add the cream and simmer for 15 minutes. Remove from heat, add the ham and chill. Add the horseradish and salt and pepper to taste (ham is usually salty enough … so see what you think). You may want to add more cream after it chills if it is too stiff. Also, it is better the next day.



Signs of Spring: Ramps

We are sure that spring is here when the ramps arrive. We’ve had them for a little while now, in limited quantities, and they have been selling out quickly to our chef clients.

These fragrant wild leeks are the hottest thing on spring menus. Among the very first green to appear in the dead woods, they are a potent reminder of the power of plants and the changing of the season.

ramps in the field

A field of ramps makes a fresh green splash on the drab forest floor.

Wonderful with bacon, egg dishes, casseroles, potatoes, in pesto and anywhere you might use scallions or leeks, wild foraged ramps (they are not grown on farms) are a joyful and flavorful way to celebrate spring.

Ramps  2

Muddy and damp, like the springtime woods.

As the season progresses and availability increases the prices will come down. If you want to buy a 5 lb bag of ramps, you may call our customer service department to order: 800-327-8246.