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Posts tagged ‘duck fat’

Garlic & Black Truffle Mashed Potatoes

This recipe is inspired by the classic Joël Robuchon mashed potato recipe which calls for equal parts potato and butter. Garlic cloves slow-cooked in duck fat are added, along with a generous amount of black truffle butter for intensely earthy and rich potatoes.

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Ingredients

2lbs Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and cut into large chunks
8-12 tablespoons Black Truffle Butter, more as needed
4 cloves Garlic Confit
Coarse salt & freshly ground black pepper, to taste
Fresh Black Truffle, for shaving (optional)

Preparation

1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil and add potatoes. Cook until just fork-tender. You don’t want soggy potatoes.

2. Drain potatoes in a colander and shake well to remove excess water.

3. Place potatoes in a large bowl, add truffle butter and season with salt and pepper. Mash the butter into the potatoes with a masher to desired consistency. They can be as chunky or smooth as you like. Alternatively, you can pass the potatoes through a ricer and then mix in butter and garlic confit, making sure to mash garlic into potatoes with back of spoon. Adjust seasoning and top with thinly-shaved black truffle. Serve.

Duck Fat 50: Oven-Roasted Veggie Fries

If you like potatoes with duck fat, you’ll love these. Gorgeous roasted vegetable “fries” get extra flavor and color from a swath of luscious duck fat right before baking. Delicious as a side dish or chilly day snack.Recipe_Oven_Veggie_Fries_HomeMedium (1)

Ingredients

Assorted root veggies, such as parsnips, turnips, carrots, and beets; scrubbed, peeled and cut into ¼ inch sticks
Duck fat, softened
Coarse salt
Finely chopped parsley (optional)

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

2. In a large bowl, toss veggie sticks with a few generous drizzles of with a drizzle of duck fat. Make sure each stick is evenly shiny with fat. Season with salt.

3. Spread evenly, in a single layer, on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake until golden brown and cooked through, flipping halfway through baking time. Fries should take about 15-25 minutes.

4. Remove from oven, taste for seasoning and season with salt if needed. Sprinkle with parsley (if using), and serve immediately.

National Cassoulet Day … and a SALE!

We’ve always celebrated cassoulet. Sometimes in October, sometimes in January. Last year we even had a Cassoulet War in February, with chefs competing against each other for trophies!  To us, winter is cassoulet season. Or at least it’s an excuse to eat lots of cassoulet.

That’s why we are so excited about National Cassoulet Day.  This year Chase’s Calendar of Events is recognizing it as an official holiday on January 9, thanks to our friend Chef Philippe Bertineau and the team at Benoit in NYC. Check the hashtag #NationalCassouletDay on social media to follow al the action. Join D’Artagnan and over 30 restaurants in New York City as we celebrate this iconic dish together.

Cassoulet Day Chase's Calendar

For our part, we are offering 15% off our cassoulet kit this week (January 5 – 9, 2015).  Get yours soon and discover the true joys of making a cassoulet at home. It’s not as complicated as you think. If you can sear sausages in a pan, and cook beans, you are pretty well set with the necessary skills. Scan the recipe here.

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Read this earlier post to earn more about the history of the cassoulet and the fierce competitiveness between the towns of Southwest France for the one true version of cassoulet. You can also listen to a cassoulet-themed song, and join in the general cassoulet mania!

Throw a cassoulet party for up to 12 friends and family with our kit that includes the ingredients you need…you can even purchase our exclusive clay bowl imported from France if you want to keep it truly authentic.

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After the cassoulet feast …

 

 

Secret Ingredient: Duck Fat

Our Secret Ingredients series shines a light on products that make all the difference when cooking with D’Artagnan.

We cannot imagine life without duck fat. Discover the joys of its silkiness and delicate flavor; pronounced enough to recognize, subtle enough to let the star ingredients shine.  We sauté with it, rub it on poultry headed into the oven, deep fry in it, beat it into dough, and generally spread the love.

Oh, duck fat, how we adore you. You will forever be in the fridge.

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Duck Fat 50: Salted Duck Fat Caramels

And now for something completely different: Salted Duck Fat Caramels from Laura at the beautiful blog Tide and Thyme. Thanks for sharing, Laura! Go have a look at what she’s up to, but first cast your eyes over this tiny miracle.

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Ingredients

1 cup heavy cream
5 tablespoons duck fat, chilled
1/2 tsp vanilla
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/4 cup light corn syrup
1/4 cup water
3 tsp sea salt

Preparation

1. Line bottom and sides of an 8-inch square baking pan with parchment paper, then lightly butter the parchment.

2. Bring cream, duck fat, vanilla, and 1 tsp salt to a boil in a small saucepan, then remove from heat and set aside.

3. Boil sugar, corn syrup, and water in a 3- to 4-quart heavy saucepan, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Boil, without stirring but gently swirling pan, until mixture is a light golden caramel.

4. Carefully stir cream mixture into the caramel (mixture will bubble up) and simmer, stirring frequently, until caramel registers 248 degrees F on a candy thermometer. Pour into baking pan and cool 45 minutes. Cut into 1-inch pieces with a buttered knife. Top each piece with a small pinch of salt, and wrap each piece in a 4-inch square of wax paper, twisting 2 ends to close.

 

 

Favorite Side Dishes for Thanksgiving

This week we are offering 15% off holiday essentials – we think of them as the “little helpers” to ease you through this year’s holiday meal and make it extra-special. Things like black truffle butter, duck fat, demi-glace and bacon. Imported French chestnuts and porcini powder bring earthy flavor and umami to recipes like classic stuffing. Speaking of which, maybe your stuffing needs a little foie gras this year. These cubes of flash-frozen foie gras are quite handy at the holidays.

For further inspiration, here are a few of our favorite things to make for the Thanksgiving meal. Just click on the photo for the recipe.

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Save 15% Off Holiday Helpers!

While the holiday bird may take center table (ours truly are stars!), the supporting cast of savory side dishes is just as important. We’re offering some of our favorite ingredients for those dishes at 15% off this week.

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Add flavor and texture to your basic stuffing with our mushrooms or chestnuts. And don’t make a holiday feast without black truffle butter – whether under the turkey skin or in mashed potatoes, it lends a rich, earthy flavor that is completely unique.

Enrich your gravy with our duck and veal demi-glace for silky body and great depth of flavor. Green beans are a holiday standard but have you tried them sautéed in duck fat? Sublime.

Take the stress out of Thanksgiving with 15% off these holiday helpers  – but only until Sunday, November 16th at midnight EST.

And if you haven’t pre-ordered your bird, there’s still time. Click through to peruse your options – we’ve got heritage breed, organic or wild turkeys. And for those who plan a small holiday gathering, we offer bone-in turkey breast and free-range capon.

 

Poutine or Disco Fries?

Poutine – that Canadian dish of exquisite perfection – is getting a lot of attention these days. This simple dish is nothing but french fries covered in a special gravy and topped with cheese curds.  But, oh, what a winning combination!

Food bloggers swoon over poutine and post photos all over the internet (go ahead, have a look).  Au Pied de Chochon in Montreal offers a version with foie gras (yes!) and a new restaurant called Big Cheese Poutinerie just opened in Chicago, offering 30 variations on the theme. Tucson residents can look forward to the August opening of the first U.S. Fries, a Canadian restaurant which will offer a poutine-centric menu.

Clearly the time has come to embrace poutine. And we are so ready.

Wait. Cheese curds?  Not impossible to find in the U.S. But it helps to be near a dairy or cheese factory, because these rubbery little chunks of salty cheese must be eaten fresh.  They are sometimes known as “squeaky cheese” because they squeak against your teeth when you bite down.

Poutine has been adapted in the U.S., specifically in New York City and parts of New Jersey, where restaurants offer “disco fries.”  By the late 1970s a hot dish of fries with beef gravy and shredded cheese was de rigueur dining for disco divas with a lot of alcohol in their systems at  2 a.m. Or at least that’s what we gather from the history page at the website Montreal Poutine.

For anyone living in Northern New Jersey during the past 35 years, disco fries have been a mainstay on diner menus. The Tick Tock Diner in Clifton, NJ offers disco fries with gravy and mozzarella 24 hours a day. A review on Trip Advisor calls them “the best disco fries in NJ.”

Eating in South Jersey Disco Fries

Disco fries. Photo from Eating in South Jersey blog

But they are NOT poutine.

The main difference between poutine and disco fries is the cheese. Cheddar or mozzarella cheese is fully melted over the heap of disco fries, unlike the cheese curds in poutine, which melt and soften, but remain whole and add a lot of chewy texture to the dish.

Apparently, you cannot even compare the two in front of a Canadian. We have one in our office and she became quite agitated at them even being mentioned in the same sentence. Sorry!

So we decided to make poutine D’Artagnan style, which means starting with duck fat fried potatoes. There is nothing better than duck fat for frying potatoes. We used 4 of our 7 ounce containers of it in this recipe. The great thing about duck fat is that you can reuse it (if it’s not burned), so let it cool and pour it into jar. Fry something else in it later. You will thank us.

Fries in the pan on the tray

One batch in the duck fat & parcooked fries on the rack.

 

Gravy

The gravy – beef & chicken stock with demi-glace

Our gravy is homemade with real chicken and beef stock, though we went a little too heavy on the chicken-to-beef stock ratio. A good dash of our duck and veal demi- glace balanced out the flavor and made the color a bit darker.

Fries in a bowl

After the second fry

Fries need to cook in hot duck fat twice. The first time for 5-8 minutes to par cook and the second time at slightly higher temperature to crisp and brown nicely.  This will only take a few minutes.

Poutine

The finished poutine

We tossed the fries in a bowl with a little gravy, then added the cheese curds, a little more salt and it was divine. If you can get cheese curds, we suggest you give it a try. And if you can’t, try them with some foie gras instead.

 

Get Deals on Duck!

We are obsessed with duck. It’s kind of our thing. And we’ve heard that you like duck as much as we do.

That’s why we’re kicking off the month of March with a giant all-things-duck sale!

This means that duck leg confit, raw moulard duck breast, whole Rohan, Muscovy or Pekin duck, smoked duck breast, duck rillettes, duck prosciutto, duck bacon, duck sausage, duck fat and even our cassoulet kit (it’s got duck in it!) are all specially priced to tempt you.

What are you waiting for?  Shop and save 15% on any duck of your choice this week at dartagnan.com.

If you need a little inspiration …

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Cassoulet is 15% Off All Week!

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“Cassoulet, like life itself, is not so simple as it seems.”  – Paula Wolfert

But our cassoulet recipe kit makes it a whole lot simpler. It includes all the ingredients you need to make a cassoulet to serve 12 (with leftovers) and a clay bowl (cassole) for baking it.

 Duck leg confit, duck and pork sausages, ventreche, duck fat, demi-glace and the all-important Tarbais beans are the simple ingredients of this legendary dish. The magic happens when all the flavors mingle together into a thick stew that is ideal for cold winter days. Just get a few bottles of Madiran or Malbec wine and invite some friends over for dinner.

Learn more about the preparation and history of cassoulet here.  And the reason we insist on using Tarbais beans here.

Click through to shop the 15% off sale now, because the deal ends Sunday, January 12, 2014.

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