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Posts tagged ‘foie gras’

Pardon My Foie Gras: Between the Covers

Pardon My Foie Gras was written by the prolific cookbook author Ruth Chier Rosen, and published in 1956. You can see her astounding collection of vintage cookbooks that span decades and cuisines at her blog Food of the Fifties. She even has an app!

Though a far cry from the comprehensive volumes Julia Child penned on French cooking, this little book offers a view into 1950s America and its attitude toward French food. Child’s book Mastering the Art of French Cooking would not appear until 1961, and we all know what happened after that!

Ruth Chier Rosen wrote an entire series of these little cookbooks. Ours measures only 4 x 5 inches, and is spiral bound with plenty of lovely vintage flourishes. Clever titles with puns are common in her oeuvre. The recipes are short, direct and easy to follow.

As you might expect, we have the foie gras themed volume.  It’s all about the “choice cuisine of France,” and we want to share a few of the pages with you here.

PMFG Front Cover & Box

The spiral bound book and a clever box to protect it.

PMFG Frontispiece

Inside the front cover, a very intense Frenchman.

As you can see, Ruth was introducing the concept that eating in the French manner involved caring. There is no place for indifference in cooking or dining.

We like Ruth’s message, and it still resonates: French food need not be intimidating. Do things simply, do them well.

In the French Manner

And here is a selection of several pages and recipes worth noting.

Soups & Sauces

We begin in the beginning. Soups & sauces.

French onion soup is a classic that borders on kitsch at this point. But made at home, with your own stock, it is something wonderful. This recipe may be a bit reductionist. It does not make clear that you must really, truly brown those onions.

The other is for chestnut soup – we love French chestnuts (and we offer them). They are perfect to pair with game and poultry; this sauté with fennel is a favorite of Ariane’s at the holidays.

PMFG onion soup chestnut soup

Two soups you might like to try.

A chapter we cannot skip: the meat and vegetables. It’s nice to see such variety – tripe, veal, lamb, sweetbreads, liver – perhaps easier to find in 1956 America than we might have expected.

Meat & Veg

Let’s get to the meat, shall we?

 

Bouef Bourg

Before Julia made it a household name: Boeuf Bourguignon

paupiettes

Paupiettes de veau

You can see Ariane’s recipe for Paupiettes de Veau, and a video in which she demonstrates the preparation. The translation is “Veal Birds,” because they are also known as oiseaux sans tête, or birds without heads. 

poultry and game

Here’s where it gets interesting.

There are plenty of recipes for chicken, and what French cookbook would be complete without a good roasted chicken recipe? It is the cornerstone of a balanced diet.

Chicken Roti

The photos are all black and white, but the charming illustrations make up for it.

We cannot resist the guinea hen – or pintade, in French. In this recipe, we wonder what happens to the rest of the hen. Naturally, every scrap should be eaten and the bones cooked down for stock. Guinea hen legs are not to be missed.

Pintade

Guinea hen is commonly eaten in France.

We were intrigued by the cassoulet recipe. But this Toulouse cassoulet seems to be missing something – could it be duck? Our version is Gascon all the way, so we are biased, bien sur. And while the simplified translation of “baked beans” is accurate, it leaves out some of the caché of cassoulet. The recipe does not involve any baking in the oven, which is the stage that makes cassoulet all crunchy on the outside.

Toulouse Cassoulet

But where’s the duck?

We were excited to see the offering from the region of Gascony. And this one involved torching a duck, so that’s fun.

cassoulet de canard

There are desserts and dishes with eggs… and some handy information about wine. We just couldn’t resist this chart of vintages from 1927-1955.

vintage chart

And if you are going to drink, please be responsible and use the correct glass.

wine glasses

Make mine crystal, please.

Wine Dinner Menu

Ruth lays out a few menus using her recipes and pairing with wine.

However, there is no foie gras in Pardon My Foie Gras. The closest thing is the pâté in the Tournedos Rossini- we know that’s supposed to be foie gras. In 1956 the only foie gras in the United States was canned pâté de foie gras. And some people still think the word “pâté” is synonymous with foie gras.

As you may now, it wasn’t until Ariane started D’Artagnan in 1985 that any fresh foie gras was available in the U.S. at all. Today we sell a variety of preparations, as well as whole livers and foie gras slices.  So here’s our version of Tournedos Rossini, with a slice of fresh, seared foie gras on top.

Tournedos Rossini

truffle man

On the inside back cover, a happy truffle hunter.

Please meet Mrs. Rosen.

ruth bio

Our little volume came with a card promoting the other titles penned by Ruth and published by her husband Richard Rosen.

Also by Ruth

Look at the last title – there was urban farming in the 1950s! Sure, it’s being reinvented today on rooftops and in vacant lots in cities across America, but here it is in 1956. Ahead of her time?

More by Ruth 2

Intrigued by the first one…

If you come across any of these little books, be sure to scoop them up. They offer a charming view of cooking in the 1950s, and would make unique gifts for those friends who are cookbook collectors.

 

Ariane Debunks the Foie Gras Myths

Ariane has been preaching the gospel of foie gras since the earliest days of D’Artagnan. She started the company to sell the first fresh foie gras raised in the United States. Today she is the leading expert on the subject.

Erin Mosbaugh at the blog First We Feast interviewed her on the controversial topic, visited Hudson Valley Foie Gras, our partner farm, and came away with a better understanding of foie gras.

We share their post and hope that you will share it in turn. Foie gras is a topic that excites a lot of passion on both sides. We only ask that people consider all the facts before drawing conclusions about foie gras. Lucky for those who want to do that, First We Feast does a fine job of explaining and debunking the common myths.

Ariane First We Feast Foie Gras Screen Shot

For those who want to learn more about foie gras, try the Artisan Farmers Alliance. And if you want to order some foie gras, we have plenty available on our website, along with recipes to inspire. (Yes, we can ship foie gras to citizens of California. The prohibition on foie gras applies only to sales and production in the state.)

foie gras recipes panel

A Customer Appreciation Sale!

We’re having a sale in your honor! It’s our way of showing appreciation for your loyalty. Take 15% off everything and anything at dartagnan.com from April 22 through April 24, 2014.

Just remember to use the promo code THANKS at checkout. Enjoy!

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Be sure to come visit us on Facebook. And maybe even share photos of what you do with D’Artagnan products. We love to see what’s cooking!

Surprise Sale on FOIE GRAS!

Just for you – to banish winter’s remaining gloom – a 50% off sale on small foie gras torchon!

HPC_TorchonSale

Super Bowl Sunday, the Meat of the Matter

For something beyond finger food…that will stick to the ribs and help absorb some of the alcohol on game day, here are our picks.

You can’t go wrong with chili. It’s a one-pot, make-ahead meal that can be ladled out in haste between plays. Melt some cheese on top, serve with corn chips. Or with bacon cornbread. Everyone loves chili. We take ours with buffalo, thank you. 

Chili & Cornbread banner vertical

For a variation on the theme, this tomatillo and lamb stew is hearty, warming, and a lovely surprise for your Super Bowl guests. You might serve it with tortillas to soak up the luscious juices.

Recipe_Tomatillo_Lamb_Stew_HomeMedium

Tomatillo Lamb Stew

Forget about the Velveeta shortage and try eating real macaroni with real cheese. And real truffles.

Whether you follow directions and make individual ramekins of this decadent mac ‘n’ cheese, or  whip up a huge batch and dole out spoonfuls, this is a dish not easily forgotten. Which is to say that when truffles and cream meet over noodles of any kind, there is true magic.  Get good at making this, because it will be requested again and again.

Recipe_Truffle_Mac_Cheese_HomeMedium

Black Truffle Mac ‘n’ Cheese

No sooner do we think of mac-n-cheese than sliders come to mind. Did we promise a foie-gras-free zone? Sorry about that! These buffalo mini burgers with foie gras are too tempting. Not to worry, it’s just our medallion of foie  gras with truffles, which we treat as a spread in this recipe. So easy! The sweet-sour tangy flavor of the onion marmalade balances this burger beautifully.

Recipe_Foie_Gras_Sliders_HomeMedium

Buffalo Burgers with Foie Gras Spread and Sweet Onion Marmalade

Class up the party with a massive Berkshire pork loin, prepared simply: stuffed with garlic and herbs, rolled, tied and then roasted. It’s an easy way to serve up to 10 people and it sure looks impressive.

Recipe_Garlic_Roast_Porkloin_HomeMedium

Garlic Roasted Pork Loin

And there’s always ribs. Glorious ribs. Smoky, sweet, sticky ribs. Roasted in the oven and slathered with sauce…pork spare ribs or St. Louis style, beef short ribs or even wild boar ribs …  we never saw a rib we didn’t like.  Serve up platters of ribs and make everyone happy this Super Bowl Sunday.

Ribs Recipes

Venison Recipes

FZRVR004-1_VA1_SQOur venison is unlike the venison you may have tried in the past.  Hunted venison is the most common stuff we come across, and there is a lot of uncertainty in the wild. Stress, age and diet all play roles in the taste and texture of the meat.

The venison we sell is farmed in the vast pastures of New Zealand, which means these deer eat a controlled diet of grass, and are processed at the ideal age. They are certified by Cervena, which guarantees that the animals are raised with humane care, fed only a controlled grass diet and are processed at a certain age.  As a result, many people are surprised when they first try our venison. It is lean yet tender, and not at all gamey. It’s a perfect option for red-meat recipes when you grow tired of beef. Venison is both elegant (think the lord of the manor) and rustic (think generations of hunters).

Here are a few recipes to inspire your cooking adventures with venison.

Recipe_Venison_Tartare_CAPT

Ingredients

1 to 1 1/2 pounds Hudson Valley Grade A duck foie gras
1 3/4 pounds venison stew meat, sinew and tendons removed, if any
2 tablespoons red onion, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons fresh chives, finely minced
1/2 teaspoon Aleppo chile pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Smoked salt
Coarsely-ground black pepper
1 teaspoon capers, coarsely chopped
1 loaf country-style bread, sliced 1 inch thick

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Season the foie gras with salt and pepper. Place the foie gras in a small roasting pan or ovenproof sauté pan that is slightly larger than the size of the foie. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the liver has browned and the flesh is firm to the touch. Reserve the fat that has rendered from the foie gras and let the lobe cool in the refrigerator until ready for use.

2. While the lobe of foie gras is cooling, put the venison through the meat grinder on a 1/4 inch cutting die. Grind the meat into a cold bowl, then cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator. Once the meat is cold again, dice the cooled foie gras into 1/4 inch pieces then add to the bowl with the meat. Add remaining ingredients and mix gently. Taste the mixture and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper then mound onto cold plates to be served. Slather the slices of grilled bread with foie gras fat and grill both sides, serving 2 pieces per person with a few extra for folks who need more.

Recipe_Venison_Spoonbread_CAPT

Ingredients

1 frenched venison ribrack, cut into 4 double chops
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt
Coarsely-ground black pepper
1 pound red radishes
1/2 cup sugar
1 container veal demi-glace, diluted in 1 cup of water
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 duck leg confit
4 eggs
1 pint heavy cream
8 ounces brioche, cut into small pieces

Preparation

1. For the spoonbread: Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a bowl, combine duck confit, eggs, heavy cream, and brioche. Stir gently until bread is evenly saturated. Season with salt and pepper. Place in an 8×8″ baking dish. Bake for 45 minutes or until set.

2. For the radishes: In a medium saucepot over medium heat combine radishes, sugar, and diluted demi-glace. Bring to a simmer. Cover and cook until the radishes are tender. Strain the radishes out and reduce the liquid until thick and syrupy. Stir in the butter. Keep warm until ready to use.

3. Season the venison on both sides with the salt and pepper. In a large sauté pan over medium high heat add the oil and sear the Cervena on both sides to get a good crust. Cook until medium rare, about 4 minutes on each side. Allow to rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before plating.
Spoon some of the spoon bread on each plate, add radishes and venison chop. Drizzle with the radish reduction.

Recipe_Risotto_Con_Cervo_HomeMedium

Ingredients

2 ounces dried porcini mushrooms
1/2 cup olive oil
1 onion, minced
1/2 cup minced ventrèche
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 pounds venison tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
2 bay leaves
1 sprig fresh rosemary + small sprigs to garnish, if desired
2 whole cloves
1/2 cup dry red wine, preferably Barolo
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 quarts chicken stock, reserving 6 cups for risotto
1 shallot, minced
2 cups Arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Preparation

1. Soak porcini in 2 cups of hot water until softened, about 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, heat half of the olive oil in a large casserole over medium-high heat. Add all but 2 tablespoons of the onions and all of the ventreche to the pan, and sauté until golden, about 8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper, add the venison, and cook until all the meat liquids have evaporated, about 15 minutes.

3. Pick out porcini and chop them coarsely, reserving the liquid except for the last 2 tablespoons of gritty sediment. Add porcini to casserole, along with bay leaves, rosemary, cloves, and red wine, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, until the wine has nearly evaporated.

4. Stir in tomato paste and seasoning lightly with salt and pepper. Add chicken stock slowly, except for reserved 6 cups, and reserved mushroom liquid, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, partially covered until meat is tender, and the sauce is thickened, about 1½ hours.

5. Remove bay leaves and rosemary, adjust seasoning, and set aside. Recipe may be made several days in advance, covered, and refrigerated. Warm before continuing.

6. Heat the remaining 6 cups of chicken stock and keep warm. Heat remaining olive oil in a medium casserole over medium-high heat. Add the reserved 2 tablespoons of onion and the shallot, and sauté until golden. Stir in rice, turning to coat with oil. Pour in white wine, stir well, and add ½ cup of the hot stock, and season with about a teaspoon of salt.

7. Cook, stirring constantly, until all liquid has been absorbed. Stir in half of the venison and sauce. Continue to add hot stock in small batches, and cook until each successive batch has been absorbed, stirring constantly, until rice mixture is creamy and al dente.

8. Remove from heat, stir in butter and cheese, and season with pepper. Ladle risotto onto 6 large plates. Spoon the remaining venison and sauce over each portion, add a small sprig of rosemary, and serve.

Gift Guide for the Food Lover

DArtagnan 2013_612There is likely someone you know who is completely obsessed with food. You don’t know how they can talk about food for so long and in such detail. But they do.

We exist for these folks. Variously called “foodies” (a term many dislike) or “foodists” (sounds a little more serious), these are our people. If you’ve got one of these fine folks on your Christmas list and have no idea what to give them … we’re here to help.

Our gift baskets come in three sizes and are each filled with a sampling of our favorite charcuterie. Not to mention truffle butter. These are designed with the gourmand in mind. You can order one here.

Why not go for something luxurious? Say, a lobe or terrine of foie gras, a tin of caviar, or a piece of premium meat, like our Wagyu beef. Something not on the weeknight dinner menu. Something memorable.

We like the cassoulet kit as a gift for a devoted cook, because it’s a cooking project and a legendary dish (Julia Child raved about it). It involves many steps and ingredients, so it’s an experience as well as a meal. And if you get the kit with the clay bowl, your gift recipient will have an unique addition to the kitchen arsenal. Just make sure you get invited over for the cassoulet feast.
Christmas Gifts Graphic

Our new Reserve Jean Reno Olive Oil would make a fantastic gift for a film and food fan. The actor Jean Reno grows the olives, works with the mill, and has personally selected the three varieties of oils that bear his name. They are not perishable, so are easy to wrap and bring to the party. Purchase a single bottle, or a set of all three varieties. These are new to the market, and exclusive to D’Artagnan. So there is a chance your foodie has not yet heard of them!

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We’ve also got samplers of products that will make you look like a food hero. Sausage collections, duck combo packs, piles of steaks, a bacon sampler, and more are available on our website. There’s always the most tasteful gift of all–the gift certificate.

And should you have any questions, we have a team of hardcore food fanatics in our customer service department. Give them a call.

Tournedos Rossini, A Legendary Recipe

The origins of this dish can be traced back to the relationship between legendary chef Marie-Antoine Carême and the composer Rossini, a known gourmand. Evidently Rossini insisted on the dish being prepared tableside so he could micromanage its creation, and when the chef objected to the interference, Rossini said, “So, turn your back.”  Whether that is true or not, this recipe bears his name, and it is as decadent, rich and satisfying today as it was when Rossini demanded it his way. Though it’s fairly easy to make, the ingredients are luxurious enough to make this a special-occasion meal. tournedos rossini1 INGREDIENTS

 PREPARATION 1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Butter 2 large ramekins. Cover the bottom of each ramekin with potato slices, brush with softened truffle butter and add another layer of potato. Repeat until all potatoes are used. Weigh down each potato cake with a smaller ramekin, then bake in the oven until edges are crisp and the center is cooked through, about 10 minutes. Using an offset spatula, remove potato cakes to paper toweling. 2. In a small bowl, combine the demi-glace, truffle juice and chopped truffles, set aside. 3. Season filets with salt & pepper. In a large skillet over medium heat. Melt the duck fat in a large skillet over medium-high flame. Sear the filets until desired doneness, about 5 minutes each side for medium-rare. Remove to a cutting board to rest, tent with foil to keep warm. 4. Discard all fat from the skillet. While the pan is still hot, add the Madeira, scraping up all the beefy bits on the bottom. Add the demi-glace mixture, cook until reduced, then remove from heat and stir in the truffle butter. Taste for seasoning and add salt & pepper, if necessary. Keep warm. 5. Heat a small, dry skillet over high flame. When hot, sear the foie gras slices until golden brown, about 60 seconds on each side. Remove to paper toweling. 6. On each of two plates, place the potato cake in the center and top with the filet mignon then foie gras. Spoon the sauce over and around. Top with freshly shaved truffle.  

Ahem. Foie Gras Sale Today.

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It’s Time for a Giveaway!

We’re giving away a GRANDE CHARCUTERIE GIFT BASKET on our Facebook page. It’s the perfect way to celebrate the holidays (a little gift for yourself, maybe?).

With a value of $99.99 and 8 of our signature pieces of charcuterie packed inside, this is a savory gift basket anyone would enjoy.

Head on over and enter for your chance to win. Get social and share the giveaway to increase your chances. Bonne chance!

Must be at least 18 years old to enter. Valid only in the United States. Giveaway ends Dec. 18, 2013.