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Posts tagged ‘humane farming’

Introducing a New Pork Chop

There’s a new cut of pork in town.


What the New York strip steak is to beef, this chop is to pork. And that’s why we call it a NY strip chop. This uncommon Berkshire pork chop is cut from the short loin and offers all the flavor and texture of heritage pork.


In other words, this is not a pale “other white meat” situation. Berkshire pork is known for its richness, dark color and mind-blowing porky flavor. You’ll find all that here. This chop has plentiful marbling, heft and tenderness going for it. All the things you look for in pork.


Nice marbling.

These meaty pork chops weigh in at 12 ounces each, on average.  And there is a little bit of bone left in. We love cooking meat on the bone – it always has more flavor. They are offered in a four pack –  two packs of  two chops  – because what would you do with just one?

Easy to cook (and even easier to eat) this new chop will quickly become a favorite at the grill or stovetop. If you love pork chops (and who doesn’t?), then give this New York strip chop a try.

About Our Berkshire Pork

Our mission is to find farmers that share our vision of a more humane and sustainable way of rearing livestock. We respect our place in the food chain, and see farmers as true stewards of the land and environment. This is why we build real relationships with our farmers, and work only with those who respect nature and focus on the best animal welfare practices.


A sow with her piglets in an individual hoop house.

Our Berkshire hogs are happy hogs, raised by a cooperative of small farms in Missouri at the foot of the Ozark Mountains. This group of about a dozen family farms raises Berkshire and cross breeds, which we refer to simply as “heritage.”

The hogs are fed on pasture, with access to water and supplemental grain consisting of corn, soybeans and rolled oats. No pesticides, animal by-products or fishmeal are allowed. The majority of the farms are sustainable “circle farms” that grow and grind their own feed for the pigs. Families of pigs are left together, to forage and frolic outdoors in pasture land. The indoor spaces offer at least 15 square feet of space per animal, and sows are never put in gestation crates.


A happy hog enjoying some forage.

The cooperative is strict about banning the use of antibiotics and hormones on each farm and limiting the number of hogs the farms raise. They seek to add another farmer to the cooperative before they add more pigs to any one farm, making the process more humane for all concerned. They are paid a premium for their humanely-raised pork, making the small family farm a profitable business, and proving that there might be a future in the old breeds after all.


Hudson Valley Farm Trip

On Monday, we hosted one of our famous field trips to Hudson Valley Foie Gras farm. Around 200 chefs from New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Washington, DC and Boston traveled in a tour bus caravan, along with D’Artagnan staffers, a brass band and members of the press.

With the looming California foie gras ban attracting a lot of attention about this misunderstood product in mainstream media, we thought it was the perfect time to let chefs see Hudson Valley’s humane practices first-hand. Once a chef sees the process, it’s pretty hard for animal rights activists to convince them that it’s inhumane.

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And chefs took to Twitter to share their farm experiences:

“Good to see that the animal rights people have it completely wrong!”

 “A great afternoon in the Hudson Valley. Humane practices at a foie gras duck farm.”

 “Thanks for having us up to the farm today, an amazing experience. Proud to support them.”

We excel at turning an educational trip into a party. After touring the barns, meeting the ducks and witnessing the feeding, chefs “gavaged” themselves with a lavish duck-centric picnic, Colombelle wines courtesy of Producers Plaimont and Sixpoint craft ales. There were games, live music, and there were photos… enjoy.