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Posts tagged ‘mushroom’

Saucy Series XIII: Mushroom Ketchup

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Mushroom Ketchup

Heston Blumenthal is a wonderful character. He appeals to me because he loves to play with food and to study ancient recipes to find inspiration for his dishes. His new restaurant, Dinner, in London is a smashing success with dishes that have a pedigree. One of his most popular historical recipes is one for mushroom ketchup.

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Mushroom ketchup has been made for hundreds of years –– you could call it the English version of soy sauce. It’s salty, positively exploding with umami and is an awesome addition to any meat dish, but can also add a wholly vegetarian meaty depth to a vegetable dish as well.

I’ve seen mushroom ketchup mentioned in recipes for years and always wanted to make it. In looking up mushroom ketchup recipes (my 1846 recipe from The Complete Cook was vague about the ratio of salt to mushrooms and I wanted guidance on that score), the more I searched, the more Heston’s name kept showing up.

Although Heston had a simple 18th century recipe for his base authentic mushroom ketchup, I really fell for a slightly more involved recipe from the 19th century that’s full of pepper –– I love pepper. Honestly, it is very little work but a 48 hour soak. Heston’s recipe is only an overnight drip. You will get somewhere around 2 cups of mushroom ketchup out of my recipe –– I did not make his version but in the video of the process, it appeared to generate about the same amount. You can store it forever in the fridge and even use the leftover mushrooms from the process to make a great mushroom pepper (after a wee dry in the oven). I’ll give you both so you can choose. Do buy the freshest mushrooms that you can. Old mushrooms have lost their liquid and will make for much less ketchup. DO NOT buy sliced mushrooms for the same reason –– they will have lost moisture with the cutting. I halved the recipe but it is easily doubled.

Dinner menu

At his London restaurant, Dinner, all his beef dishes are served with mushroom ketchup, but when I see the pictures of the mixture I am confused because the sauce I see is thick and glossy and mushroom ketchup is the texture of soy or Worcestershire sauces. Big surprise, Heston played with the texture –– he likes to play with food. Authentic mushroom ketchup has the same texture as soy sauce –– Heston makes mushroom ketchup plus.

Taking my cue from Heston, I deployed my sauce series partner D’Artagnan’s magnificent pasture-raised boneless strip sirloin steaks as a perfect medium for my mushroom ketchup. The meat was splendid –– so tender and full of flavor. History tastes great.

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Sirloin Steak with Mushroom Ketchup for 2

2 boneless strip sirloin steaks from D’Artagnan
light salt and pepper
1 T olive oil
Heston’s Mushroom Ketchup Sauce

Salt and pepper the steak. Don’t use much salt because the ketchup is salty. Heat a cast-iron skillet till quite hot. Add olive oil to the pan and put the steaks in the pan. Brown each side. The steak will be rare at this point. Cook longer for more doneness. Let rest a few minutes before serving with the mushroom ketchup.

Heston’s Mushroom Ketchup Sauce

2 oz red wine
1 oz red wine vinegar
1 small chopped shallot
pinch of cloves and mace ( I think pepper would be good too if you are not using my recipe for the mushroom ketchup base)
1 c mushroom ketchup (use Heston’s or the recipe from The Complete Cook – recipes follow)*
2 t cornstarch dissolved in 1 1/2 T cold water
drained, marinated mushrooms (recipe follows)

Reduce by 1/2 (his recipe called for 2/3rds reduction and I thought that was too much) and strain out the shallots – you will have a little over 1/2 a cup. Add the cornstarch mixture to the hot mixture and return to a low heat for a few minutes. Stir till thickened and remove from the heat. Add the marinated mushrooms and serve with the steak. Depending on the amount of marinade the mushrooms have soaked up, you may want to toss a bit of the mushroom marinade into the ketchup to your taste – I liked the little extra sweetness that it added.

*mushroom ketchup is thin, Heston’s recipe is a thick sauce made from the ketchup

Marinated Mushrooms

5 oz red wine vinegar
1/4 c sugar
4 oz mushrooms, sliced

Heat the vinegar and sugar to melt the sugar. Pour over the mushrooms and marinate for 24 hours.

Heston’s Recipe for Mushroom Ketchup

(used as base for the sauce, from an 18th c recipe)

1 3/4 lbs mushrooms, sliced
1 1/3 oz salt

Combine the salt and the mushrooms. Enclose in fabric (old t-shirt maybe?) and twist cloth and hang over a pot for 24 hours. Squeeze tightly to extract as much liquid as possible.

Mushroom Ketchup from The Complete Cook

1 3/4 lb mushrooms, pulsed a few times in a food processor or roughly chopped immediately before using
2 oz salt in the original recipe or about 3 T (I think 2T might be better — it’s very salty)
1 oz black peppercorns
1/2 oz allspice berries
1 T brandy

Put the mushrooms and salt in a glass or ceramic bowl and blend well. Let them sit for 2 hours and then stir and cover. Leave for 2 days, stirring a few times a day.

Put into a canning jar with the spices and screw the lid on, you should have around a quart.

Put in a stockpot and bring the water to a low boil (I put a wad of foil at the bottom so the glass wouldn’t touch the metal) for 2 hours. Strain the liquid into another pan using a fine sieve pressing hard on the solids. I finished up the process with a potato ricer that got every last bit of juice out of the mushrooms, but putting them in a cloth and squeezing would work well. Reserve the mushroom pieces that remain from the pressing.

At this point Sanderson recommends reducing the ketchup by half. If you are using it for the Blumenthal ketchup skip this step as the ratio of ketchup to his wine/vinegar mix will be off. Do cool the mixture and add the brandy. Put it in a canning jar. You should have 2 cups unreduced and 1 cup reduced. It is quite salty.

Preheat your oven to 200º, Spread the pepper mushroom mixture on the pan, remove the larger allspice berries and dry for 1 hour or until dried out. Put in a spice grinder and grind. Use as a wonderful mushroom flavored pepper in all your dishes.

More mushroom love!

Chantal Martineau from (one of our favorite sites) Food Republic, interviewed Ariane during the wild mushroom harvest dinner at North Square Restaurant. Here’s what she learned…

 

In Season Right Now: Wild Mushrooms

Nov 29, 2011 9:01 am

Fungi and games with D’Artagnan’s Ariane Daguin

 

Hedgehog, fried chicken, cauliflower, canary, lobster. An odd menu, right? Well, not so weird, it turns out: these are all wild mushrooms available through D’Artagnan, the foie gras and truffle specialist and purveyor of other fine meats and mushrooms to restaurants around the country.

D’Artagnan’s founder, Ariane Daguin, is something of a mushroom expert. She peels off their Latin names the way other people call out their favorite bands. Over a recent fungus-laced meal, that began with wild mushroom soup and ended with white truffle ice cream, she discussed her job as fungus hunter.

Why are November and December such big months for mushrooms?
In the Northern hemisphere, it’s the end of the fall and in the Southern hemisphere, it’s spring. So both seasons are good times for mushrooms. What’s particularly exciting in the Northern hemisphere, especially at the end of November, is that the truffles are coming in.

How did truffles get to be so prized?
There are recipes from Escoffier where he is using 10 kilos of truffles and sometimes not even to eat—just as a decoration around the dish. So, there was a time when truffles were really plentiful. I wouldn’t say it was like potatoes, but there were more. Now, as cities get larger and the size of the woods diminishes, there are less truffles.

At D’Artagnan, how do you find what mushrooms are in season?
We have a purchasing team that is looking at the whole world as a sourcing possibility. For example, I always thought that morels came at the start of spring (because I was raised in France). But the more east you go — Russia, Turkey — the earlier they come. And we do that with every wild mushroom. Going back to truffles, there used to be none in the Southern hemisphere. Now, there are growers in Australia. So, we can have black winter truffles in the middle of the summer.

Do mushrooms have terroir, as in taste different depending on where they’re from? Read more

Mushroom Mania!

vibrant bluefoot mushrooms, like otherworldly delights
vibrant bluefoot mushrooms, like otherworldly delights

There are hundreds of products that come in and out of D’Artagnan that the general public never gets the chance to see. Our catalogue of chef-only items is expansive and runs the gamut, from specialty game like ostrich and goat to large primal cuts of beef, exotic eggs and whole animals, like 300 lb Yorkshire pigs. Some of the most exciting gastro-gems come out of the mushroom department.

Our mushroom expert, Frank (who we affectionately refer to as Frank the Forager) sources hard-to-find fungi from all over the globe. Chefs usually snatch up mushrooms and truffles as soon as they come in but today we got lucky and with Frank’s assistance were able to take some photos before they flew out the door. Click through the slideshow below for a peek (the 4 arrows in the  bottom right corner expand the size).

Since we now all have mushrooms-on-the-brain, here’s an idea for easy holiday hors d’oeuvre that can be made in stages ahead of time.

earthy, creamy, buttery and crisp. perfect for the holidays.

Wild Mushroom Tartelettes

This is more of an instruction than a formal recipe. Feel free to make substitutions.

You will need: A few pounds of assorted wild mushrooms (we used trumpet royal, maitake and honshimeji), 1 package of good quality, store-bought puff pastry (like Dufour), 1 shallot, butter, fresh thyme, salt & pepper, mascarpone cheese, and a hunk of your favorite brie.

1.   Thaw puff pastry, unfold and smooth out. Using a 1.5 inch biscuit cutter, cut several rounds and place on a silpat or parchment lined baking sheet. Using a 1/2 inch biscuit cutter or pastry tip, make an impression in the center of each round without cutting all the way through. Chill. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Bake the chilled shells for about 15-20 minutes or until puffed and golden. Remove and set aside to cool. When cool enough to handle, remove the centers of each shell using the tip of a paring knife if needed. These shells can be made a day ahead – once completely cooled, store in an air-tight container. (This canape can also be made with store-bought shells, but the freshly baked versions always taste better.)

2. Finely chop all mushrooms. Finely chop shallot. Heat a few tablespoons of butter in a large skillet. Add shallot and sweat. Add mushrooms, stirring to coat with butter. Season with salt and pepper. The mushrooms will expel some water after they’ve been salted. Add chopped thyme leaves. You want to keep cooking the mushrooms, stirring often, until they’re golden and dry. Stir in about a tablespoon of mascarpone, mixing until melted and evenly coating mushrooms. Remove from heat and set aside.

3. Slice brie into small squares, about 1/2″x1/2″x1/4″. Spoon mushroom mixture into tart cups and set on a sheet pan. Place a square of brie on top of each tart, place in a warm oven until just soft. Serve immediately.

Note: All steps can be done ahead of time up to assembly – even a few days in advance. Assembly can be done a few hours ahead. Warm just before ready to serve.

We must confess, this mushroom madness was inspired by the following 2 photographs of Ariane and her daughter Alix.

Alix in Wonderland  &  Ariane among the Amanitas

These giant Amanitas are part of the Carsten Höller: Experience currently on exhibit at New York City’s New Museum. The showing runs through mid-January, check it out if you’re in town!

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