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Posts tagged ‘pork’

A Cassoulet Giveaway

January 9th is National Cassoulet Day, celebrated by all who are devoted to this  hearty dish of slow-cooked beans and cured meats. In honor of the occasion, we are giving away 2 cassoulet recipe kits with our friends Languedoc Wines. Because everyone knows that cassoulet and red wine were made for each other. And the only thing better than cassoulet is FREE cassoulet. So head over to the site and enter for your chance to win (there’s also a great discount on cassoulet offered when you enter).

Cassoulet in Cassole

In our kit you will find 3 pounds of Haricot Tarbais, the heirloom beans typically used for cassoulet in Southwest France. Duck leg confit, that miracle of preserved duck, features prominently in our recipe.  Two types of sausage and preserved pork belly called ventrèche are the other cured meats  in our version of this classic dish. All of this – and a little duck fat and demi-glace – will feed 12 people (more or less, depending on appetites). So get a party together and start planning for cassoulet victory!

For a bit of cassoulet inspiration watch our video of Ariane making cassoulet with Chef Pierre Landet. Anyone can make cassoulet – there’s no reason to be intimidated. Check our recipe to see how simple it is. And good luck in the giveaway.

Introducing a New Pork Chop

There’s a new cut of pork in town.

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What the New York strip steak is to beef, this chop is to pork. And that’s why we call it a NY strip chop. This uncommon Berkshire pork chop is cut from the short loin and offers all the flavor and texture of heritage pork.

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In other words, this is not a pale “other white meat” situation. Berkshire pork is known for its richness, dark color and mind-blowing porky flavor. You’ll find all that here. This chop has plentiful marbling, heft and tenderness going for it. All the things you look for in pork.

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Nice marbling.

These meaty pork chops weigh in at 12 ounces each, on average.  And there is a little bit of bone left in. We love cooking meat on the bone – it always has more flavor. They are offered in a four pack –  two packs of  two chops  – because what would you do with just one?

Easy to cook (and even easier to eat) this new chop will quickly become a favorite at the grill or stovetop. If you love pork chops (and who doesn’t?), then give this New York strip chop a try.

About Our Berkshire Pork

Our mission is to find farmers that share our vision of a more humane and sustainable way of rearing livestock. We respect our place in the food chain, and see farmers as true stewards of the land and environment. This is why we build real relationships with our farmers, and work only with those who respect nature and focus on the best animal welfare practices.

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A sow with her piglets in an individual hoop house.

Our Berkshire hogs are happy hogs, raised by a cooperative of small farms in Missouri at the foot of the Ozark Mountains. This group of about a dozen family farms raises Berkshire and cross breeds, which we refer to simply as “heritage.”

The hogs are fed on pasture, with access to water and supplemental grain consisting of corn, soybeans and rolled oats. No pesticides, animal by-products or fishmeal are allowed. The majority of the farms are sustainable “circle farms” that grow and grind their own feed for the pigs. Families of pigs are left together, to forage and frolic outdoors in pasture land. The indoor spaces offer at least 15 square feet of space per animal, and sows are never put in gestation crates.

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A happy hog enjoying some forage.

The cooperative is strict about banning the use of antibiotics and hormones on each farm and limiting the number of hogs the farms raise. They seek to add another farmer to the cooperative before they add more pigs to any one farm, making the process more humane for all concerned. They are paid a premium for their humanely-raised pork, making the small family farm a profitable business, and proving that there might be a future in the old breeds after all.

 

Perfect Pork Plating with Anita Lo

Chef Anita Lo of Annisa, a long-time friend of D’Artagnan, was featured on Serious Eats explaining her philosophy behind plating pork loin. Yes, it’s our Berkshire pork, but aside from that, we have a lot of respect for Chef Anita and find this a fascinating peek into the mind of a brilliant chef.

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We are not going to spoil this by trying to explain it, so  just head over to Serious Eats for the full post.

And for more Anita Lo – in action – check our video in which she and Ariane demonstrate how easy it is to sear foie gras.

October is ….

… National Chili Month,  National Apple Month and National Pork Month.  Yes, all in October. Who decides these things? Whoever you are, we thank you.

Apples by Evelyn Simak

Apple tree, photo by Evelyn Simak

To celebrate, we offer you recipes that involve one or more of these, because we don’t have one for pork and apple chili. But that could be interesting…Happy October!

Anasazi Cowboy Chili with Buffalo & Nopales

Anasazi beans are a cross between kidney and pinto beans. They hold their shape beautifully in this spicy buffalo chili recipe by Steve Sando.

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Ingredients

Serves 6-8

1 pound Anasazi beans
1 1/2 medium white onions, chopped
6 cloves garlic, finely chopped
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 pound ground buffalo meat
1 jalapeño chile pepper, finely chopped
2 teaspoons cumin seeds, toasted and ground
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
3/4 teaspoon good-quality chile powder, such as chipotle
1 can (14 1/2 oz) crushed tomatoes
1 cup lager beer
2 tablespoons masa harina (optional)
2 nopales paddles, prepared and cooked
Crème fraîche
Grated cheddar cheese
Scallions, sliced, white and pale green parts
Fresh cilantro, chopped

Preparation

1. Soak beans overnight in water at room temperature.

2. After soaking, put the beans in a large pot with their soaking water and enough cold water to cover the beans by 1 inch. Bring to a boil. Add one-third of the onions and half of the chopped garlic. Reduce the heat to low and simmer, partially covered, until the beans are nearly done, about 1 hour. Season with salt.

3. Meanwhile, in a soup pot or Dutch oven over medium-high heat, warm the oil. Add the meat, season with salt, and cook, stirring, until the meat loses all of its pink color and begins to brown. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside. Pour off most of the fat.

4. Add the remaining onions and garlic and the chile, and sauté until soft, about 10 minutes, scraping up any browned bits clinging to the bottom of the pot. Add the cumin, oregano, chile powder, tomatoes, and beer and return the meat to the pot. Add the beans and their broth. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer gently until the flavors are blended and the beans are tender, about 30 minutes. Taste and adjust the seasonings, adding salt and pepper and more chile powder if needed.4

5. If you’d like a thicker chili, dissolve the masa harina in 1/2 cup water, stirring well to eliminate lumps. Stir the paste into the chili, add the nopales, adjust the seasonings, and cook for 10 minutes. Ladle the chili into warmed bowls. Pass the sour cream, grated cheese, green onions, and cilantro at the table.

CHEF’S NOTE: Any of the pinto beans will work nicely in this chili, as will Vallarta, yellow Indian woman, or black beans.

Pork Chops with Apples

Lucinda Scala Quinn’s homey pork chops with apples and cider are sure to become a family favorite. The perfect recipe to celebrate the apple harvest!

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Ingredients

Serves 6

6 Berkshire Pork Milanese chops
Salt and coarsely-ground black pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 large white onion, sliced
2-3 apples, cored and sliced (about 3 cups)
1 cup apple cider, white wine, or chicken stock

Preparation

1. Trim the chops of excess fat and sprinkle generously with salt and pepper on both sides. Heat a 14-inch cast-iron skillet (if you have a smaller one, you’ll need to work in batches) over high heat, and then swirl in the olive oil. Lay the pork chops in the pan and don’t move for a few minutes. This assures a good golden sear. Turn the chops over and brown well on the second side for a total of about 10 minutes. Remove the chops to a warm plate.

2. Swirl the butter into the pan. Add the onion and apples. Sauté until the onion slices are lightly caramelized and the apples have begun to soften, about 8 minutes. Stir in the beer or other liquid. Return the chops to the pan.

3. Cook until the pork is tender, about 15 more minutes (depending on the size of the chops), turning halfway through and covering the chops with the apple mixture. If the apple mixture needs a little thickening, remove the chops to the warm plate again and simmer the mixture on high for a few minutes to reduce. Serve the chops over rice or mashed potatoes with a large spoonful of the apple-onion mixture over the top.

Potato Latkes with Foie Gras & Apples

There is no reason to wait for Hanukkah to make these golden potato pancakes. After all, it’s National Apple Month. First the pancakes are crisped in duck fat and then crowned with silky foie gras and tart apple.

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 Ingredients

Serves 6

2 medium Granny Smith or other tart green apples, peeled, cored, and cut crosswise in 1/8-inch slices (reserve trimmings)
2/3 cup simple syrup
1¼ cups duck and veal demi-glace
2 medium-large baking potatoes (about 1¼ pounds), peeled
1 small onion
1 small golden delicious or other sweet apple, peeled
1 tablespoons minced flat-leaf parsley
1 egg, beaten
6 or more tablespoons all-purpose flour
Salt and freshly ground white pepper to taste
1 duck fat
6 foie gras slices

Preparation

1. Combine sliced apples with simple syrup in a bowl and soak for 8 hours or overnight.

2. Add apple trimmings to demi-glace, bring to a boil, then simmer for 30 minutes. Strain and keep warm.

3. Grate potatoes, red apple, and onion. Gently stir in parsley, egg, and flour, and season with salt and pepper. Heat enough duck fat to measure about ½ inches deep in a large heavy skillet. Form mixture into 12 pancakes. If too moist, add a little more flour. When fat is hot, about 375 degrees F, add only as many pancakes as will comfortably fit in pan without crowding, flattening them slightly. Cook until browned and crispy on both sides, turning once. Remove with a slotted spatula, blot on paper towels, and keep warm in a warm oven.Discard fat and wipe out pan.

4. Heat pan until very hot. Season foie gras with salt and pepper, and sauté until lightly browned and medium-rare inside, about 45 seconds per side.

5. On warm plates, place a potato pancake, then add an apple slice and a foie gras medallion on top. Spoon on sauce, and serve.

 

 

Charc Week Continues: Jambon de Bayonne

Our jambon de Bayonne is made right here in the United States, and some would argue that the use of “Bayonne,” as in the AOC, is all kinds of wrong. Ariane was well aware of this when she began making the product in the early days of D’Artagnan. Of course, she could see Bayonne from her office window… Bayonne, NJ, that is. Using the same simple, centuries-old dry-curing technique that made this ham famous in France, our domestic version may break rules, but it satisfies jambon cravings.

Try it wrapped around figs, melon or pear slices. Sandwiched in a baguette with mustard. On a charcuterie board with cheese.

Buy it now and save 15% off at dartagnan.com during our Charc Week celebration – when all charcuterie is 15% off.  The sale ends Sept. 7 at midnight EST.

jambon de bayonne equation CharcWeek

 

 

Summer Freezer Sale: Save 25%

Use this rare opportunity to save 25% off customer favorites including organic chicken, Wagyu beef, Rocky Mountain lamb and more. Those in the know shop early and shop hard, because quantities are limited and the deals are hot!

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We would like to highlight a few products that you might want to try while they are on sale.

A staff favorite, the Berkshire porterhouse pork chops weigh in at a whopping 16 ounces each (on average). Beautiful and juicy, they are pork at its best.

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Our pasture-raised beef brisket is ready for the smoker or a braise in the oven. Whatever method you choose, this hardworking chunk of flavorful beef will serve you well at dinners and outdoor parties.

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Guinea hen legs? Absolutely! Not eating guinea hen? You’re missing out on some dark, flavorful  meat.  They can be grilled or battered and fried like chicken legs.

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Our annual August Freezer Sale ends Sunday, August 17th, 2014 and quantities are limited so get shopping!

 

St. Patrick’s Day SALE

They say everyone is Irish on St. Patrick’s Day… even the French! We’re just happy to eat like the Irish (and maybe quaff a few beers) on this saint’s day.

We’d like you to do the same. This week, enjoy 10% off a selection of beefy, lamby and porky items that will help you to celebrate all things Irish this March 17. Erin go bragh!

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If you are looking for recipes, you can always check our site for inspiration. We like this Irish Stout Lamb Loin with Colcannon for a traditional meal. Of course, there’s always Corned Beef. And then, a meat pie is so satisfying  – this Wagyu Beef  Shepherd’s Pie is especially so.

If a hand pie is what you crave, try these Dingle Pies from The Country Cooking of Ireland by Colman Andrews. They are a savory, rustic staple at Ireland’s oldest festival, Puck Fair.

Super Bowl Sunday, the Meat of the Matter

For something beyond finger food…that will stick to the ribs and help absorb some of the alcohol on game day, here are our picks.

You can’t go wrong with chili. It’s a one-pot, make-ahead meal that can be ladled out in haste between plays. Melt some cheese on top, serve with corn chips. Or with bacon cornbread. Everyone loves chili. We take ours with buffalo, thank you. 

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For a variation on the theme, this tomatillo and lamb stew is hearty, warming, and a lovely surprise for your Super Bowl guests. You might serve it with tortillas to soak up the luscious juices.

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Tomatillo Lamb Stew

Forget about the Velveeta shortage and try eating real macaroni with real cheese. And real truffles.

Whether you follow directions and make individual ramekins of this decadent mac ‘n’ cheese, or  whip up a huge batch and dole out spoonfuls, this is a dish not easily forgotten. Which is to say that when truffles and cream meet over noodles of any kind, there is true magic.  Get good at making this, because it will be requested again and again.

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Black Truffle Mac ‘n’ Cheese

No sooner do we think of mac-n-cheese than sliders come to mind. Did we promise a foie-gras-free zone? Sorry about that! These buffalo mini burgers with foie gras are too tempting. Not to worry, it’s just our medallion of foie  gras with truffles, which we treat as a spread in this recipe. So easy! The sweet-sour tangy flavor of the onion marmalade balances this burger beautifully.

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Buffalo Burgers with Foie Gras Spread and Sweet Onion Marmalade

Class up the party with a massive Berkshire pork loin, prepared simply: stuffed with garlic and herbs, rolled, tied and then roasted. It’s an easy way to serve up to 10 people and it sure looks impressive.

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Garlic Roasted Pork Loin

And there’s always ribs. Glorious ribs. Smoky, sweet, sticky ribs. Roasted in the oven and slathered with sauce…pork spare ribs or St. Louis style, beef short ribs or even wild boar ribs …  we never saw a rib we didn’t like.  Serve up platters of ribs and make everyone happy this Super Bowl Sunday.

Ribs Recipes

Saucy Series Part V: Sauce Robert

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Sauce Robert

Sauce Robert is one of the ancient sauces. Mentioned in literature and dating from at least the 15th century, it remained popular right through to the 19th century (although you can still buy bottled Sauce Robert, it is nothing like the original).

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La Varenne

The sauce is used brilliantly in the 17th century by the legendary cook La Varenne in a dish made with pork (you can read more about the history HERE.) This is no surprise since the sweet and sour oniony mustard sauce is a perfect accompaniment to pork.

Although the original was made with the whole loin, I decided that I would use D’Artagnan’s tenderloin for this recipe since I love the texture. Also, D’Artagnan’s Berkshire Pork has such a full flavor, unlike any supermarket tenderloin you are used to. It’s great pork, and the careful way it was raised can be tasted. Since it cooks quickly, a meal fit for a king can be ready in no time. Cooking the onions slowly is the longest step.

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Pork Tenderloin with Sauce Robert, serves 4

2 pork tenderloins
1 T lard or butter
1 large onion chopped
2 T butter
½ t salt and ½ t pepper*
pinch ground cloves
¾ c verjuice ** + ¼ c white wine vinegar OR ½ c white wine and ½ c white wine vinegar
2 small bunches sage leaves
½ c demi-glace
2 T grainy mustard

1. Heat the butter in a skillet and add the onions and one of the sage bunches. Cook at low heat for about ½ an hour till soft and sweet, stirring regularly.

2. Preheat oven to 425º.

3. Put the lard or butter in the heated pan, salt and pepper the tenderloins, put in the skillet and brown the meat over high heat for a minute or two on each side. Put them in the oven for 10 -15 minutes or until the internal temperature is 145º. Remove from the oven and tent while you finish the sauce.

4. Remove the sage, add the verjuice and vinegar and begin reducing over medium-low heat. Add the demi-glace and stir till you have a thick sauce. Pour any juices from the pan (after removing excess fat) and pour any accumulated juices from the plate into the sauce. Add the salt and pepper and cloves.

5. Taste for seasoning and then add the mustard. Serve with the sliced tenderloin garnished with the rest of the sage.

*originally long peppers and grains of paradise would be used…they are great so use them if you can get them.

** verjuice is vinegar-like but milder and absolutely delicious –– refrigerate after opening

Happy Halloween!

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Yes, that is Vincent Price in the kitchen. Known as a true gourmand, a wonderful host, and an expert on wines, Price was also a world traveler. He and his wife Mary collected recipes from the chefs they met at restaurants, and together they authored quite a few cookbooks. Several can be seen below, and are now out of print and considered collectible. If you find one at a flea market, snatch it up.

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And long before there was a channel devoted to cooking, Price made recordings of recipes, such as this one describing roast pork with prunes (“even prune haters will love this!”), and a pickled mushroom preparation. And let’s not forget the wine. In another record, Price talked about gracious entertaining, which must include wine, and thus: Wine is Elegance. Thrill as you hear him draw out the word “riesling.” And naturally, he raves about California wines long before the rest of the country caught on.

These dramatic recordings in his unmistakable voice even inspired this silly mashup on Youtube.

If you feel like seconds, check out this marvelous online exhibit dedicated to the many aspects of Vincent Price. It seems a fitting activity for Halloween.