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Posts tagged ‘rohan duck’

A Saucy Series, Part II: Sauce Madame

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Sauce Madame

As part of my series on sauces, this goes to the top of the pack as an ancient ancestor of European sauces. Even ketchup owes a debt to this sauce, as does Sauce Espagnole.

This recipe for Sauce Madame is over 600 years old, and comes from the oldest cookbook in England – actually, it wasn’t even a book, it was a long scroll that a household scribe kept in the kitchen of Richard II that has come to be known as the Forme of Cury (cury comes from the French, Querie – the business of a cook –– not the spice). If you would like more of the history, visit my blog for the rest of the story.

Sauce Madame 2

Sauce Madame meets Rohan duck

The recipe is richly flavored, full of fruit and enriched with breadcrumbs and not flour, as was the style from the Middle Ages through the Renaissance. The texture is smooth and elegant. I include a recipe for the sauce without galyntyne, if you want to skip the bread addition –– it was made that way as well.

Normally made with goose, I decided to use one of D’Artagnan’s Rohan ducks and the result is delicious. You could also make the stuffing separately (in a covered casserole with a tablespoon of duck fat and 1 cup of demi-glace cooked for ½ hour to 45 minutes till fruit is tender) and use it with duck breast or legs and thighs…it would be good with chicken as well. The sauce keeps well and you can make the poudre douce and galyntyne ahead of time. I froze some of the galyntyne to use later and it worked beautifully.

Duck in Sauce Madame (original recipe, with measurements interpreted)

1 duck (a Rohan duck ) 5 ½ to 6 pounds
2 T salt
3 c cored, peeled and roughly chopped pears and quinces or tart apples (if you use quince, chop small or steam for a few minutes to soften). I only had pureed quince that I had put up this year so added ½ a cup of that and ½ an apple for texture.
2 c grapes
5 cloves peeled garlic, cut in slices
branch of sage
1 c chopped parsley
2-3 sprigs fresh hyssop or thyme (or 2 t dry)
2-3 sprigs fresh savory (or 2 t dry)
½ to ¾ c juices from duck with some of the fat –– if there’s not enough add demi-glace
¼ c galyntyne (recipe below)
½ c red wine
2 t powdered or grated galingal to your taste (available in the Thai section of your market) or use powdered ginger
3 t poudre douce (recipe below) or to your taste

Preheat oven to 375º

Rub duck with salt inside and out.

Combine fruit, garlic and herbs and stuff the duck with it. Truss up the bird so the stuffing doesn’t leak out.

Put ½ an inch of water in a roasting pan and put the duck on a rack, breast side down. Turn the bird after ½ an hour so the breast side is up. Roast about 1½ hours total for a medium bird –– you will be keeping it warm so you don’t need to cook it to death (around 150º when measured at the thigh). Check the bird regularly and turn the pan in the oven every half hour or so. You may want to put foil around the legs so they don’t burn.

When the bird is done, remove the stuffing and tent the bird.  Put the juices in a heavy saucepan with the stuffing. Stir and allow the fruit mixture to cook a bit more; the fruit may not be softened enough and will improve with a bit of a cook. Add the galantine and wine and spices. Stir to combine.

While the mixture is cooking and after the bird has rested 10 minutes, carve the bird into serving pieces and keep warm in a 200º oven while you finish the sauce. Originally these would be speared with a knife and eaten with fingers. Pour the sauce over the duck and serve.

Poudre douce:

4 t powdered ginger
1 t cinnamon
1 t grains of paradise
1 t ground nutmeg
1 t sugar

Grind together.

Image

Deana’s galyntyne, a medieval recipe

Galyntyne

1/4 cup toasted bread crust, ground good pinch each of galingal, ginger, cinnamon
1 t salt
½ c wine vinegar (approximately)

Combine the breadcrumbs with the spices and salt. Add enough vinegar to make a thick sauce and set aside. You can push though a strainer if you want a finer texture.

Notes: I used about ¼ of the crust of a peasant loaf. I cut it off the bread and toasted it till medium brown (a toaster oven works well, but you can do it in the oven on a cookie sheet at 300º). Then I put it in the processor. To make it extra fine I put it in the spice grinder in batches to give it a fine texture. Then I toasted it in a skillet to get it a little browner –– don’t take your eyes off it when you are doing it. It goes from perfect to burnt quickly –– stir constantly.

Sauce Madame 3

Sauce Madame, sans bread

Sauce Madame sans Bread

Stuffing from bird
juices from duck with some of the fat (around a cup, about 2 T of that duck fat or to taste)
½ c demi-glace
½ c red wine
1 t powdered or grated galingal
2 t poudre douce

Cook the stuffing with the rest of the ingredients. Reduce till thickened somewhat and serve on the duck.

Duckspotting @ Mindy’s Hot Chocolate, Chicago

Duckspotting is snapping & sending in pics of dishes from your favorite restaurants, made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We supply restaurants all over the country & love to see what creative chefs are doing with our products. Keep sending them in!

seared rohan duck breast with grilled baby bok choy and cherry-port compote

Our exclusive Rohan duck breast – Chicago style!

Where: Mindy’s Hot Chocolate

What: Chef Mindy Segal’s Rohan Duck Breast with Grilled Baby Bok Choy and Cherry-Port Compote

How: Hot Chocolate is at 1747 N. Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL 60647  |   for reservations click here or call (773) 489-1747

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out!

Duckspotting @ Tuyo, Miami

Duckspotting is snapping & sending in pics of dishes from your favorite restaurants, made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We supply restaurants all over the country & love to see what creative chefs are doing with our products. Keep sending them in!

Where: Tuyo

What: Award-winning Executive Chef Norman Van Aken’s Molasses-Marinated Rohan Duck Breast and Foie Gras and Cornbread Stuffed Quail with Calabaza and Ancho-Pomegranate Reduction

How: Tuyo Restaurant is on the rooftop of Miami Culinary Institute in downtown Miami

415 N.E. Second Ave. Miami, FL 33132 |   for reservations click here or call (305)237-3200

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out!

Duckspotting @ La Esquina, New York City

Duckspotting is snapping & sending in pics of dishes, from your favorite restaurants, made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We supply restaurants all over the country & love to see what creative chefs are doing with our products. Keep sending them in!

 

Where: La Esquina

What: Chef Akhtar Nawab makes a killer pepita mole sauce – here, it finishes arepa dumplings and our Rohan duck breast.

How: La Esquina is @ 114 Kenmare, New York, NY 10012  |   Reservations for the brasserie are taken 21 days or 3 weeks to the day. Call (646) 613-7100

There are 3 ways to enjoy a meal at celebrity favorite, La Esquina – at the walkup taqueria (open daily from 8am – 2am), the street level cafe (open for lunch from 12-4pm, sunset menu from 4-5pm, then dinner 5-midnight, 1am on Fridays & Saturdays, weekend brunch from 11am-3:45pm) and the underground brasserie – see above for reservations. Hidden behind a secret door, the basement level brasserie is well worth the wait. The dinner-only space features an expanded menu, over 200 premium tequilas and nightly live DJ’s from 11pm-2am.

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out

Duckspotting @ City Feed and Supply, Boston

Duckspotting is finding, snapping & sending in pics of tasty dishes, from your favorite restaurants (or markets!), made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We sell to restaurants & fine retail stores all over the country & love to see what creative chefs & cooks are doing with our products. Keep sending them!

City Feed & Supply Literally spotting duck at City Feed and Supply deli counter

Where: City Feed & Supply, Boston, MA

What: Roasted Rohan Duck Quarters (manager Jeff Morin loves this new duck!)

How: City Feed & Supply has two locations:  Centre St. & Boylston St. in Boston, MA.  Check out their website for details.

City Feed & Supply is a neighborhood grocery/café/deli with a focus on natural, organic, local, sustainable and fair trade items.

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out!

Have you met Rohan?

He’s new in town. He’s rich. He’s handsome. American with a French accent. And he’d love you to bring him home for dinner.

He’s our new duck! Exclusively ours! The D’Artagnan Rohan™ is a proprietary hybrid of several duck breeds including the Heritage Mallard and the Pekin, and is raised just for us on a farm in New York State.

The duck is named after a family of dukes and princes who lived in the Rohan area of Brittany, France, and made the name, and a native duck, famous. The Rohan boasts juicy, tender, rose-colored meat with a mild taste that lends itself to practically every duck recipe.

Never administered antibiotics, hormones, or steroids the Rohan duck is raised cage-free and fed a diet of corn and soy. The duck is available in two sizes: 5-5 ½ lbs and 5 ½-6 lbs. Because it is air-chilled, that weight is all meat and bone, not water retained during processing. This means that the skin crisps up nicely however it is prepared and the flavor is pure, unadulterated duck.

In keeping with the nose-to-tail philosophy of cooking, the duck is sold with neck and giblets, both of which are handy in making stock and adding rich flavor to sauces.

Rohan is a name of strength and speaks to the heritage of this hardy and delicious duck, which is now available for professional chefs and home cooks alike, only at D’Artagnan.

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