Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘steak’

Game Day Eats: Top 5 Mains for Super Sunday

Looking for game day menu ideas? A cold afternoon in February seems like the perfect time for warming, hearty dishes and you can score a touchdown with our game day recipes. Plus you can save 15% right now on both our Game Day and Charcuterie collections.

Top 5 Main Dishes for Super Sunday

1. Cassoulet is nothing but French chili – granted, it has a lot of incredible cured meats and the heirloom Tarbais beans. It’s what chili dreams of becoming. Essentially it’s a hearty one-pot meal that is best enjoyed with lots of red wine.

Cassoulet in Cassole

2. Korean-style buffalo steak.  You can sear the steak in a grill pan if it’s too cold to cook outside. Or you could wear a coat. Either way, this smoky and sweet steak is a winner.

easy-korean-bbq-kalbi-buffalo-steak-recipe

3. Ribs. Is there anything so wonderful? These coffee-rubbed ribs are simple to make and will please everyone at the game. Baby back ribs are best on the grill, though we have enjoyed oven-braised ribs from first bite to the last lick of the bone.

baby-back-ribs-with-coffee-bbq-sauce-recipe

4. Big juicy meatballs can be messy (watch the sauce!) but are always welcome. This recipe can be enjoyed over pasta, but is perfectly delicious on its own, with a hunk of good bread to sop up the sauce. frankies-meatballs-recipe

5. Slow-cooked wild boar shoulder. Eat it on mashed potatoes, pasta or in a sandwich. This is the beginning of something delicious, saucy and oh, so tender.

slow-cooked-pulled-wild-boar-shoulder-recipe

6. How could we resist? It’s not really a main course, but it could be if you eat enough of it. This black truffle mac and cheese recipe makes an everyday food downright elegant. So fancy up your game-viewing party with a big batch of this creamy goodness.

truffled-mac-and-cheese-recipe

Look for our next game day post on chicken wings. You know they are required feeding.

New Steak Gift Sets

Just in time for the gift-giving season, here are three new ways to share your love of steak. Each collection is offered at a special price for the holiday season. Click through the links to get more details.

Our marbled and flavorful beef comes from cattle raised exclusively for us by a cooperative of ranchers committed to strict protocols of humane animal husbandry. No antibiotics, hormones or steroids are ever used, which means the cattle take a little longer to come to market, but that’s fine with us. A stress-free lifestyle produces tasty results.

The Triple Play – 4 Boneless Ribeye Steaks. 4 NY Strip Steaks. 4 Filets Mignons. That’s 12 pieces of extraordinary steak that you can enjoy at home, share at a dinner party, or give as a gift to some lucky carnivore.

KITPR001-1_VA0_SQ (1)

Then there is the Filet Mignon Special – for those special occasion dinners – with 8 tender petite steaks.

KITPR003-1_VA0_SQ (1)

For those with a fondness for the ribeye steak, meet the Ribeye Lover’s Collection.  With 4 each of our boneless and bone-in ribeye steaks, the only question is: what will you do with 8 juicy ribeyes steaks?

KITPR002-1_VA0_SQ (1)

Ribeye Steaks with Bleu Cheese Sauce & Crispy Shallots

Creamy, cool bleu cheese sauce and crunchy shallot rings are the perfect foil for smoky and rich ribeye steaks – hot off the grill. Serve these beauties with your favorite potato dish and a crisp green salad.

Recipe_Ribeye_BlueCheeseOnions_HomeMedium

Ingredients

2 shallots, thinly sliced into rings
¾ cup whole milk
¾ cup all-purpose flour
¼ cup cornstarch
Oil, for frying
Coarse salt
2 cups crumbled blue cheese
¾ cup heavy cream
Freshly cracked black pepper
4 Bone-In Ribeye Steaks, about 20 oz. each

Preparation

1. Add shallots to a small bowl, cover with milk and allow to soak for about 30 minutes. In another small dish, mix together flour and cornstarch. Working in batches, using a fork, dredge the shallot rings in the flour mixture, coating evenly. Put battered rings aside on a plate. In a shallow skillet, heat oil to 350 degrees.

2. Again working in batches, fry battered shallots until golden brown and crisp. Drain on paper towels. Season with coarse salt and set aside.

3. In a small bowl, fold together blue cheese crumbles and cream. Season with pepper. Refrigerate until needed.

4. Heat grill to medium-high or heat coals in a charcoal grill until they glow bright orange and ash over. Lightly oil hot grates.

5. Let steaks stand at room temperature for about 20 minutes. Season both sides of each steak with coarse salt and freshly cracked black pepper.

6. Grill steaks for about 6 minutes on the first side, rotating 90 degrees at the halfway mark to create cross-hatch grill marks, if desired. Using tongs, flip each steak to the other side and grill for another 6 minutes, or until desired doneness. We suggest medium-rare, which would register 125 degrees on an instant-read thermometer.

7. Let steaks rest for 8 -10 minutes before serving, each with a generous spoon of blue cheese sauce. Top with crispy shallots.

A Day of Meat: Backstage at a Photo Shoot

What do you do when you’ve got a whole lot of meat to photograph? Well, here at D’Artagnan we turn to Ted Axelrod, a local photographer with an appreciation for good food and a meaty sense of humor.

Ted’s studio is in his home, which is crammed with all kinds of cool props, from cutting boards to glassware, vintage dishes to copper pots. He’s got perfect natural light in his sunroom and a spare refrigerator, which came in handy for us.

With piles of products ranging from raw Wagyu beef short ribs and rack of lamb to truffle butter and charcuterie, we set to work on the two-day shoot. Turns out it’s not so easy to make raw meat look appetizing! Our hats are off to all the food stylists and photographers out there whose work makes us drool.

Ted’s dogs, Gracie and Ella, were so well behaved; they didn’t snag a single duck breast off the table. And considering they had to endure the smell of raw meat all day, that’s a small miracle! We will admit to tossing them a few trimmings from the steaks and chops…and the innards from the chicken and pheasant.

On day two we set up a huge panoramic spread that represented nearly every type of product we sell. With a camera suspended on an arm directly overhead, we tweaked and previewed and reorganized until everything looked perfect. Then we unwrapped it all!  As soon as meat is exposed to the air, it begins to oxidize, which makes it dull in color. You’ve got to move fast.

Naturally, we left the fridge full of food!  Ted and his wife Susan, who is a food writer and editor, have been cooking up a storm with it all, and posting some of the results on their blog Spoon and Shutter.

We love their braised pheasant post, with step-by-step instructions, and the great photos (we’d expect nothing less!). Check out their progress as they try to eat their way through our catalog!

Look for Ted’s photos to be posted on our website soon.