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Posts tagged ‘venison recipe’

Saucy Series IX: Cumberland

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Cumberland Sauce

Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne were giants of the American stage from the 1920s to 1960. They were also legendary entertainers at their home in Manhattan but mostly in Genesee Depot, Wisconsin. All of the greats of stage and screen dropped by their out-of-the-way farm for R&R. Everyone loved it. Fontanne was the perfect hostess and Lunt the master chef. After retiring from the stage, Lunt even got a Cordon Bleu degree and wrote a cookbook that was published after his death by the foundation that took over the house. It is chock full of amazing recipes, all the more so when you think that the likes of Katharine Hepburn, Lawrence Olivier, Noel Coward and Joan Crawford enjoyed them at one time or another.

Cumberland at table

I loved the book and its stories and photos but fell in love with his take on Cumberland Sauce. I LOVE Cumberland Sauce and couldn’t leave it off my Sauce Series list. It is a classic game sauce that has been around in one form or another for a hundred years. Although named after the Duke of Cumberland and thought to be thoroughly English, it has its roots in Germany. Lunt adds a touch of magic in his version with the addition of a bit of horseradish. Best I ever tasted. Although I have always associated it with venison, it would be great with any pork (chops, loin, tenderloin or even sausage or ham) or a game bird (duck to grouse and pigeon) and even would work for vegetarians because it is amazing on sweet potatoes (sans the demi-glace).

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If you like venison, run, do not walk to D’Artagnan for the best venison tenderloin ever. It’s butter tender and full of flavor –– I made it rare and loved it that way. It is also extremely lean, so best not to cook it too much. The sweet and savory combination with a bit of heat from the horseradish and cayenne is masterful and you understand why this sauce has been a favorite for generations (something like it has been used since at least the 18th century). The best part? It takes about 15 minutes to make and can be done ahead of time. That means a world-class dinner could be ready in 1/2 an hour. It’s low in fat and high in flavor, how cool is that?

Cumberland 3

Venison Tenderloin with Cumberland Sauce (serves 3-4)

2 venison tenderloins from D’Artagnan
1 c red wine
2 t juniper berries
1 t salt
1 t pepper
1 bay leaf
1 t dry thyme
2 T butter or oil
Cumberland sauce
Steamed sweet potato (a squeeze of orange is great on them)
sautéed spinach

Combine the wine and spices and marinate the venison overnight. Remove from the fridge. Dry the meat and heat the oil in a skillet. Add the meat and sear on all sides. Cook for about 5 more minutes for rare. Tent for 5 minutes, slice and serve with Cumberland sauce and sweet potato and spinach.

Cumberland 1

Alfred Lunt’s Cumberland Sauce (serves 4)

1 t chopped shallot
1 T orange peel in fine julienne
1 T lemon peel in fine julienne
¼ c port
2 T D’Artagnan demi-glace (optional)
1/3 c currant jelly
juice of 1 orange
juice of ½ lemon
½ t dry English mustard
dash of cayenne
1 t freshly grated horseradish with 1 t sherry vinegar or 1 t prepared horseradish*

Boil shallots for 2 minutes in a little water and strain and reserve. Do the same with the lemon and orange peels. Melt the currant jelly and add the peels and shallots. Reduce till thickened and serve warm or at room temperature.

*I am kind of crazy about horseradish so I added a bit more after the sauce had cooked for extra kick.

Cumberland 2

Venison Recipes

FZRVR004-1_VA1_SQOur venison is unlike the venison you may have tried in the past.  Hunted venison is the most common stuff we come across, and there is a lot of uncertainty in the wild. Stress, age and diet all play roles in the taste and texture of the meat.

The venison we sell is farmed in the vast pastures of New Zealand, which means these deer eat a controlled diet of grass, and are processed at the ideal age. They are certified by Cervena, which guarantees that the animals are raised with humane care, fed only a controlled grass diet and are processed at a certain age.  As a result, many people are surprised when they first try our venison. It is lean yet tender, and not at all gamey. It’s a perfect option for red-meat recipes when you grow tired of beef. Venison is both elegant (think the lord of the manor) and rustic (think generations of hunters).

Here are a few recipes to inspire your cooking adventures with venison.

Recipe_Venison_Tartare_CAPT

Ingredients

1 to 1 1/2 pounds Hudson Valley Grade A duck foie gras
1 3/4 pounds venison stew meat, sinew and tendons removed, if any
2 tablespoons red onion, finely chopped
1/2 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
2 tablespoons fresh chives, finely minced
1/2 teaspoon Aleppo chile pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
Smoked salt
Coarsely-ground black pepper
1 teaspoon capers, coarsely chopped
1 loaf country-style bread, sliced 1 inch thick

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Season the foie gras with salt and pepper. Place the foie gras in a small roasting pan or ovenproof sauté pan that is slightly larger than the size of the foie. Roast for 25 to 30 minutes, until the liver has browned and the flesh is firm to the touch. Reserve the fat that has rendered from the foie gras and let the lobe cool in the refrigerator until ready for use.

2. While the lobe of foie gras is cooling, put the venison through the meat grinder on a 1/4 inch cutting die. Grind the meat into a cold bowl, then cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator. Once the meat is cold again, dice the cooled foie gras into 1/4 inch pieces then add to the bowl with the meat. Add remaining ingredients and mix gently. Taste the mixture and adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper then mound onto cold plates to be served. Slather the slices of grilled bread with foie gras fat and grill both sides, serving 2 pieces per person with a few extra for folks who need more.

Recipe_Venison_Spoonbread_CAPT

Ingredients

1 frenched venison ribrack, cut into 4 double chops
1 tablespoon olive oil
Salt
Coarsely-ground black pepper
1 pound red radishes
1/2 cup sugar
1 container veal demi-glace, diluted in 1 cup of water
4 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 duck leg confit
4 eggs
1 pint heavy cream
8 ounces brioche, cut into small pieces

Preparation

1. For the spoonbread: Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. In a bowl, combine duck confit, eggs, heavy cream, and brioche. Stir gently until bread is evenly saturated. Season with salt and pepper. Place in an 8×8″ baking dish. Bake for 45 minutes or until set.

2. For the radishes: In a medium saucepot over medium heat combine radishes, sugar, and diluted demi-glace. Bring to a simmer. Cover and cook until the radishes are tender. Strain the radishes out and reduce the liquid until thick and syrupy. Stir in the butter. Keep warm until ready to use.

3. Season the venison on both sides with the salt and pepper. In a large sauté pan over medium high heat add the oil and sear the Cervena on both sides to get a good crust. Cook until medium rare, about 4 minutes on each side. Allow to rest on a cutting board for at least 5 minutes before plating.
Spoon some of the spoon bread on each plate, add radishes and venison chop. Drizzle with the radish reduction.

Recipe_Risotto_Con_Cervo_HomeMedium

Ingredients

2 ounces dried porcini mushrooms
1/2 cup olive oil
1 onion, minced
1/2 cup minced ventrèche
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
2 pounds venison tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
2 bay leaves
1 sprig fresh rosemary + small sprigs to garnish, if desired
2 whole cloves
1/2 cup dry red wine, preferably Barolo
2 tablespoons tomato paste
2 quarts chicken stock, reserving 6 cups for risotto
1 shallot, minced
2 cups Arborio rice
1/2 cup dry white wine
2 tablespoons unsalted butter, cut into small pieces
1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Preparation

1. Soak porcini in 2 cups of hot water until softened, about 20 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, heat half of the olive oil in a large casserole over medium-high heat. Add all but 2 tablespoons of the onions and all of the ventreche to the pan, and sauté until golden, about 8 minutes. Season lightly with salt and pepper, add the venison, and cook until all the meat liquids have evaporated, about 15 minutes.

3. Pick out porcini and chop them coarsely, reserving the liquid except for the last 2 tablespoons of gritty sediment. Add porcini to casserole, along with bay leaves, rosemary, cloves, and red wine, and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes, until the wine has nearly evaporated.

4. Stir in tomato paste and seasoning lightly with salt and pepper. Add chicken stock slowly, except for reserved 6 cups, and reserved mushroom liquid, bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, and simmer, partially covered until meat is tender, and the sauce is thickened, about 1½ hours.

5. Remove bay leaves and rosemary, adjust seasoning, and set aside. Recipe may be made several days in advance, covered, and refrigerated. Warm before continuing.

6. Heat the remaining 6 cups of chicken stock and keep warm. Heat remaining olive oil in a medium casserole over medium-high heat. Add the reserved 2 tablespoons of onion and the shallot, and sauté until golden. Stir in rice, turning to coat with oil. Pour in white wine, stir well, and add ½ cup of the hot stock, and season with about a teaspoon of salt.

7. Cook, stirring constantly, until all liquid has been absorbed. Stir in half of the venison and sauce. Continue to add hot stock in small batches, and cook until each successive batch has been absorbed, stirring constantly, until rice mixture is creamy and al dente.

8. Remove from heat, stir in butter and cheese, and season with pepper. Ladle risotto onto 6 large plates. Spoon the remaining venison and sauce over each portion, add a small sprig of rosemary, and serve.