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Posts tagged ‘wild mushrooms’

Holiday Helpers are 15% OFF this Week!

This time of year it’s all about the turkey at D’Artagnan. But let’s not forget all the side dishes that are vital to the Thanksgiving feast.

Mashed potatoes, anyone? We always add black truffle butter to ours.  And who doesn’t love stuffing? You need wild boar sausage and chestnuts for that.

Duck fat and demi-glace are workhorses in the kitchen. And what holiday is complete without a little foie gras and fungi?

Be prepared for anything with our holiday helpers, all 15% off this week.

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Turkey Breast Recipes

The question of whether you prefer white or dark meat is a crucial one at Thanksgiving. But how can one turkey yield enough of the preferred meat for each diner? The simple answer is to augment the whole roasted turkey with a turkey breast.  And the overwhelming majority of people prefer the pale, juicy meat of the breast (don’t look at us! We like it dark).  You can roast the breast whole, or debone it, stuff and then roast it. Here are three tempting recipes that work for Thanksgiving, but are also perfect for any meal.

Simple Roasted Turkey Breast

Here’s a basic technique for roasting a bone-in turkey breast, which is great for smaller holiday gatherings or even a sunday roast. Add your favorite herbs and spices as you wish.

Recipe_Simple_Roasted_Turkey_Breast_HomeMedium

INGREDIENTS

4-6lb bone-in turkey breast
2 tablespoons duck fat, softened
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 cup water, if needed

PREPARATION

1. With the rack in the center position, preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Fit a small roasting pan with a V-shaped rack.

2. Rub softened duck fat (or olive oil) over turkey breast, and season with salt and pepper. Center turkey breast on rack, skin side up. Transfer to oven, and roast until juices run clear and an instant-read thermometer reads 160 degrees F when inserted into the thickest part of the breast, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. (If at any point the butter/juices in the pan start to burn, add about ½ cup water to the pan.)

3. Transfer to a platter, tent loosely with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes before carving.

Turkey Roulade with Black Truffle Butter

This simple turkey breast roulade not only makes a fabulous holiday centerpiece, it makes versatile leftovers too!

Recipe_Turkey_Roulade_HomeMedium

INGREDIENTS

4-6lb bone-in turkey breast
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
3oz. container black truffle butter, softened
½ cup water, if needed

PREPARATION

1. With the rack in the center position, preheat oven to 425 degrees F.

2. Using a sharp boning knife, place knife close to bone and carefully remove breast from bone, keeping breast meat connected. Place deboned breast skin-side down on work surface. If necessary, carefully pound breast between plastic, keeping skin intact, to make even. Season with salt and pepper then spread evenly with truffle butter.

3. Fold left and right sides in toward center and roll evenly until both sides meet. Turn rolled breast so skin side is facing up and adjust shape as necessary. Using kitchen twine, tie at 2-inch intervals. Transfer to a roasting pan and season the outside with salt and pepper.

4. Transfer roasting pan to oven and cook for 30 minutes. Decrease oven temperature to 350 degrees and continue cooking until internal temperature reaches 155 degrees on an instant-read thermometer, about 1 hour more. (If at any point the butter/juices in the pan start to burn, add about ½ cup water to the pan.) Remove turkey from oven and transfer to a cutting board. Let stand 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Turkey Breast with Mushroom Stuffing

This simple turkey breast roulade is packed with earthy flavor from mushroom duxelles and sauteed leeks. Delicious.

Recipe_Mushroom_Stuffed_Turkey_Breast_HomeMedium

INGREDIENTS

2 tablespoons black truffle butter
1 medium shallot, chopped
1 pound organic chef’s mix mushrooms, sliced
2 tablespoons water
Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 small leek, cleaned, trimmed, and finely chopped
1 teaspoon sherry-wine vinegar
6-8lb organic turkey breast
½ cup unsalted butter, melted

PREPARATION

1. Heat truffle butter in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring, 2 to 3 minutes. Add mushrooms and cook, stirring, 5 to 6 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and add 2 tablespoon water; season with salt and pepper and cook until mushrooms are tender, about 5 minutes more.

2. Remove from heat and transfer to the bowl of a food processor; pulse 2 to 3 times to coarsely chop. Set chopped mushroom mixture aside. Add remaining 1 1/2 teaspoons olive oil to skillet and heat over high heat. Add leek and season with salt and pepper; cook, stirring until leek is tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Add chopped mushroom mixture to skillet and stir to combine. Remove from heat and add vinegar; stir to combine. Transfer to a bowl and let cool to room temperature before using. (This can be done up to 1 day ahead!

3. With the rack in the center position, preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

4. Using a sharp boning knife, place knife close to bone and carefully remove breast from bone, keeping breast meat connected. Place deboned breast skin-side down on work surface. If necessary, carefully pound breast between plastic, keeping skin intact, to make even. Season with salt and pepper then spread evenly with mushroom stuffing, leaving a half-inch border on all sides. Don’t mound the stuffing or the turkey will be difficult to roll. Starting at 1 end, roll the turkey like a jelly roll and tuck in any stuffing that tries to escape on the sides. Carefully turn roulade skin side up and reshape if necessary. Tie the roast firmly with kitchen twine every 2 inches to make a compact cylinder.

5. Place roulade on a rack over a sheet pan. Brush with the melted butter, sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, and roast for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer registers 150 degrees F in the center. Remove turkey from oven and transfer to a cutting board. Let stand, loosely tented with foil, at least 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Turkey Breast Roulade with Brioche & Sausage Stuffing

This recipe is great for smaller holiday gatherings. Once you master the roulade technique, you can use any of your favorite stuffings, but we love this one which contains both salty and sweet bites.

Recipe_Turkey_Breast_Roulade_with_Brioche_Stuffing_HomeMedium

INGREDIENTS

7-10 lb organic turkey breast, deboned & butterflied
Coarse salt & freshly ground black pepper
2 cups stale brioche cube
1 package duck & Armagnac sausage
12 pitted prunes, diced
1 small stalk celery, diced
½ medium carrot diced
1 two-inch section of leek, sliced thin
1 shallot
1 tsp fresh thyme leaves
3 leaves fresh sage, chiffonade
4 tbs butter, melted
1 cup chicken stock

PREPARATION

1. Make your stuffing: Remove the duck & Armagnac sausage from its casing and place in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Brown the sausage, breaking up any large chunks as it cooks. Using a slotted spoon, remove to a large bowl and set aside. Pour off all but about 2 tablespoons of the sausage fat from the pan. Place the pan over medium heat. Add celery, carrot, shallot and leek. Cook, scraping up the crispy browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until soft and translucent. Add to the sausage.

2. While the sausage/veggie mixture is still warm, stir in the herbs. Add toasted brioche, mix to combine. Season with salt & pepper. Add melted butter and chicken stock. Using your hands, turn the mixture to combine, squeezing the bread cubes to moisten. Stir in prunes. Set aside.

3. Debone your turkey breast: using a sharp boning knife, carefully run the blade as close to the bones as possible, all around the rib cage and up to the back, to remove. It’s easiest to work on one side at a time. Be mindful to keep the breast intact. Reserve bones for stock. If the breast meat is too thick to roll, butterfly it or carefully pound with a meat mallet to flatten a bit. Keep breast skin side down, season with salt & freshly ground black pepper. Spread stuffing evenly, leaving a half-inch border on all sides. Don’t mound the stuffing or the turkey will be difficult to roll. Starting at 1 end, roll the turkey like a jelly roll and tuck in any stuffing that tries to escape on the sides. Carefully turn roulade skin side up and reshape if necessary. Tie the roast firmly with kitchen twine every 2 inches to make a compact cylinder.

4. Place roulade on a rack over a sheet pan. Brush with the melted butter, sprinkle generously with salt and pepper, and roast for 1 3/4 to 2 hours, until an instant-read thermometer registers 150 degrees F in the center. Remove turkey from oven and transfer to a cutting board. Let stand, loosely tented with foil, at least 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

Duckspotting @ Destination Dogs, New Brunswick, NJ

Duckspotting is snapping & sending in pics of dishes from your favorite restaurants, made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We supply restaurants all over the country & love to see what creative chefs are doing with our products. Keep sending them in!

destination dogs DUCKSPOTTING

Where: Destination Dogs

What: Chef John Durna’s Quail and Roasted Wild Mushroom Sausage Topped with Baby Spinach, Quail Egg and White Truffle Vinaigrette

How: Destination Dogs is located at 9 Spring Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901 | (732)993-1016 | follow them on twitter @DestinationDogs

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out!

More mushroom love!

Chantal Martineau from (one of our favorite sites) Food Republic, interviewed Ariane during the wild mushroom harvest dinner at North Square Restaurant. Here’s what she learned…

 

In Season Right Now: Wild Mushrooms

Nov 29, 2011 9:01 am

Fungi and games with D’Artagnan’s Ariane Daguin

 

Hedgehog, fried chicken, cauliflower, canary, lobster. An odd menu, right? Well, not so weird, it turns out: these are all wild mushrooms available through D’Artagnan, the foie gras and truffle specialist and purveyor of other fine meats and mushrooms to restaurants around the country.

D’Artagnan’s founder, Ariane Daguin, is something of a mushroom expert. She peels off their Latin names the way other people call out their favorite bands. Over a recent fungus-laced meal, that began with wild mushroom soup and ended with white truffle ice cream, she discussed her job as fungus hunter.

Why are November and December such big months for mushrooms?
In the Northern hemisphere, it’s the end of the fall and in the Southern hemisphere, it’s spring. So both seasons are good times for mushrooms. What’s particularly exciting in the Northern hemisphere, especially at the end of November, is that the truffles are coming in.

How did truffles get to be so prized?
There are recipes from Escoffier where he is using 10 kilos of truffles and sometimes not even to eat—just as a decoration around the dish. So, there was a time when truffles were really plentiful. I wouldn’t say it was like potatoes, but there were more. Now, as cities get larger and the size of the woods diminishes, there are less truffles.

At D’Artagnan, how do you find what mushrooms are in season?
We have a purchasing team that is looking at the whole world as a sourcing possibility. For example, I always thought that morels came at the start of spring (because I was raised in France). But the more east you go — Russia, Turkey — the earlier they come. And we do that with every wild mushroom. Going back to truffles, there used to be none in the Southern hemisphere. Now, there are growers in Australia. So, we can have black winter truffles in the middle of the summer.

Do mushrooms have terroir, as in taste different depending on where they’re from? Read more

Mushroom Mania!

vibrant bluefoot mushrooms, like otherworldly delights
vibrant bluefoot mushrooms, like otherworldly delights

There are hundreds of products that come in and out of D’Artagnan that the general public never gets the chance to see. Our catalogue of chef-only items is expansive and runs the gamut, from specialty game like ostrich and goat to large primal cuts of beef, exotic eggs and whole animals, like 300 lb Yorkshire pigs. Some of the most exciting gastro-gems come out of the mushroom department.

Our mushroom expert, Frank (who we affectionately refer to as Frank the Forager) sources hard-to-find fungi from all over the globe. Chefs usually snatch up mushrooms and truffles as soon as they come in but today we got lucky and with Frank’s assistance were able to take some photos before they flew out the door. Click through the slideshow below for a peek (the 4 arrows in the  bottom right corner expand the size).

Since we now all have mushrooms-on-the-brain, here’s an idea for easy holiday hors d’oeuvre that can be made in stages ahead of time.

earthy, creamy, buttery and crisp. perfect for the holidays.

Wild Mushroom Tartelettes

This is more of an instruction than a formal recipe. Feel free to make substitutions.

You will need: A few pounds of assorted wild mushrooms (we used trumpet royal, maitake and honshimeji), 1 package of good quality, store-bought puff pastry (like Dufour), 1 shallot, butter, fresh thyme, salt & pepper, mascarpone cheese, and a hunk of your favorite brie.

1.   Thaw puff pastry, unfold and smooth out. Using a 1.5 inch biscuit cutter, cut several rounds and place on a silpat or parchment lined baking sheet. Using a 1/2 inch biscuit cutter or pastry tip, make an impression in the center of each round without cutting all the way through. Chill. Preheat oven to 400 degrees F. Bake the chilled shells for about 15-20 minutes or until puffed and golden. Remove and set aside to cool. When cool enough to handle, remove the centers of each shell using the tip of a paring knife if needed. These shells can be made a day ahead – once completely cooled, store in an air-tight container. (This canape can also be made with store-bought shells, but the freshly baked versions always taste better.)

2. Finely chop all mushrooms. Finely chop shallot. Heat a few tablespoons of butter in a large skillet. Add shallot and sweat. Add mushrooms, stirring to coat with butter. Season with salt and pepper. The mushrooms will expel some water after they’ve been salted. Add chopped thyme leaves. You want to keep cooking the mushrooms, stirring often, until they’re golden and dry. Stir in about a tablespoon of mascarpone, mixing until melted and evenly coating mushrooms. Remove from heat and set aside.

3. Slice brie into small squares, about 1/2″x1/2″x1/4″. Spoon mushroom mixture into tart cups and set on a sheet pan. Place a square of brie on top of each tart, place in a warm oven until just soft. Serve immediately.

Note: All steps can be done ahead of time up to assembly – even a few days in advance. Assembly can be done a few hours ahead. Warm just before ready to serve.

We must confess, this mushroom madness was inspired by the following 2 photographs of Ariane and her daughter Alix.

Alix in Wonderland  &  Ariane among the Amanitas

These giant Amanitas are part of the Carsten Höller: Experience currently on exhibit at New York City’s New Museum. The showing runs through mid-January, check it out if you’re in town!

D’Artagnan Thanksgiving Survival Guide: Day 4

It’s Day 4 of our Turkey Day guide! And the home-stretch of Turkey Roasting 101. S0 – the bird is now perfectly roasted and ready to come out of the oven. You have already cleared a safe place for it, with surfaces protected if necessary from the intense heat of the roasting pan. Your cutting board with juice trough, sheet pan or warmed platter are situated close by………. uh… now what?!

Turkey Roasting Basics, Part 4

Give the Bird a Breather… Finally, it is time for a good rest. Unfortunately, that rest is for the bird, not for you. After the turkey is through cooking, remove it from the oven, and transfer it to the waiting board, pan or warmed platter. Then place it in a warm place (out of the way of any drafts) to allow it to ‘rest’ with the dressing still inside. Do not just place it on a flat cutting board. If that is Read more

D’Artagnan Thanksgiving Survival Guide: Day 3

Welcome to Day 3 of our Thanksgiving Survival Guide! By now, you’ve learned some turkey roasting basics, so you chose a technique to initially protect the turkey from the dry heat; it is in the oven roasting beautifully, and you are basting away diligently – this is great! Now comes the second step towards a moist, juicy bird – don’t overcook it!

 

Turkey Roasting Basics, Part 3

First, use each basting as an opportunity to keep an eye on the browning. If the skin becomes too brown – too soon before the bird has cooked through, you can prevent over browning or burning, simply by shielding the skin. You do this with a piece of aluminum foil, shiny side up, that you crease from side-to-side across the center to form a tent shape. Place this tent very loosely over the top of the turkey. Be sure to leave at least 2 to 3 inches open between the bottom of the foil and the top of the roasting pan, to avoid trapping moisture or steam under the tent (remember, dry heat). If at this point the bird is already as brown as you would like, use the foil shield through the remainder of the cooking, and continue to baste as usual.

Otherwise, take the foil off at the beginning of the last hour of your cooking range to allow the bird to continue browning and the skin to ‘crisp’ again. If after that, the skin has browned to your liking, and the bird has still not finished cooking; just put a tent back over the turkey and leave it until the bird does finish cooking. In either case, it is very important to continue basting as usual.

Are we there yet?
Even when equipped with a guideline and good intuitive timing, a quick read or instant read meat thermometer is an indispensable little tool for determining when your bird has finished roasting. These are not the same meat thermometers that protrude out of the breast throughout roasting. Quick read thermometers have a slender sensor that you push into the meat to take the temperature

Read more

D’Artagnan Thanksgiving Survival Guide: Day 2

In the first installment of our Thanksgiving Survival Guide, we told you why turkeys should have fat added to the mix during roasting and gave specific oven temperatures for best results. For Day 2, we’re taking these lessons one step further, to ensure crispy skin and moist meat, with buttering, cloaking and barding.

Turkey Roasting Basics, Part 2

Here are three more ways to protect a turkey from the dry, oven heat, which will send you well on your way to roasting the perfect holiday bird.

Buttering beneath the skin is the second technique, and this one actually helps the bird to self-baste. This treatment is a particularly delicious choice for our free-range organic turkeys. For birds up to 16 pounds start with a well-chilled 1- pound roll of our black truffle butter, you may want two rolls if your bird is any bigger. Slice each roll evenly creating approximately 1/4-inch thick discs. Use your fingers to slip between the skin and meat at the neck opening, gently working up to using your entire hand to ease your way carefully along the breast and leg meat, taking care not to puncture the skin. Then place these black truffle butter discs in an even layer over the entire surface created between the skin and the bird; pat the skin back into place, and season generously with a Read more

Upcoming Event: Wild Mushroom Harvest Dinner

Celebrate fabulous fungi with Ariane and Chef Yoel Cruz with wonderful wines and beautiful mushroom dishes, such as Pan Seared Scallop with Porcini, Asparagus and Brown Butter Sauce & Filet Mignon with King Oyster Mushroom Tart and Merlot Glaze. And as if you needed more incentive, White Truffle Ice Cream is making a cameo at dessert. Who can resist?! Click here for tickets!

 

 

D’Artagnan Thanksgiving Survival Guide: Day 1

Can you believe there are only 16 days left until Thanksgiving?! While warm, fuzzy visions of time off, family gatherings, food and football fill the minds of many, if you’re the designated chef on Thanksgiving, the tick-tock may have you feeling more distress than delight. Even seasoned cooks can feel a tad overwhelmed this time of year, and if you’re new to cooking or if this is just your first time hosting Turkey Day the pressure may frazzle your nerves like they’ve never been frazzled before. But before you have a total-food-freak-out, just remember – we’re here to help! 

This year, we’ve launched a brand, spanking new section of our website that’s chock-full of helpful articles, videos and chef recipes. And for Thanksgiving in particular, we’ve compiled a great deal of tried and true information, from how to choose your holiday bird to how to carve it and everything in between. So starting now we’re going to post a new article, video or recipe on this blog everyday until Thanksgiving.

We’ll start with the basics… Turkey Roasting Basics, Part 1! Here’s everything you need to know to get that beautiful bird into the oven. Read on…

Read more

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