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Posts tagged ‘black truffles’

Foie Gras Cream Puffs with Black Truffle

Looking for a show-stopping appetizer for your Valentine’s Day dinner? Or perhaps the perfect hors d’oeuvre for a party? Amuse your bouche with these crispy choux puffs  – the silky, creamy, truffle-studded foie gras center makes a satisfying contrast of textures.

foie-gras-cream-puffs-recipe

Ingredients

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 eggs
½ cup water
Pinch of salt
½ cup all-purpose flour
Sel gris or Maldon salt
1 Medallion of Foie Gras with Black Truffles, softened

Preparation

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with a silicon mat or parchment paper.

In a medium saucepan over high heat, add butter, water, and a pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Turn the heat to low and add the flour all at once. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until the mixture pulls away from the pan and forms a ball, about 1 minute. Remove pan from heat and beat in eggs one at a time, whisking until smooth and glossy. Scoop dough into a pastry bag fitted with a standard coupler, no tip needed. Pipe mounds onto the prepared baking sheet (approx. 1½” dia x 1½“ h) leaving a few inches in between each. With a wet finger, gently smooth the top of each mound and sprinkle with a pinch of sel gris.

Bake until the pastries are golden brown and puffed, about 25-30 minutes. The puffs should sound hollow when tapped. Using a bamboo skewer, poke a small hole in each puff to allow steam to escape. Cool completely.

While the puffs are cooling, scoop the softened foie gras into a pastry bag fitted with a ¼ inch tip. Poke a hole into the bottom of each choux puff and fill with foie gras. Serve immediately at room temperature or chill until ready to serve.

Christmas in July: Black Winter Truffles

A truffle is an irregular, round-shaped fruiting body of fungi, which grows underground in a symbiotic and mysterious relationship with the roots of trees. On average, truffles vary in size from a walnut to a golf ball, but there are sometimes exceptional truffles that can weigh a pound or more.

Tuber melanosporum, the black winter truffle

Tuber melanosporum, the black winter truffle

Tuber melanosporum is often called the black “Perigord” truffle, after the legendary truffles of that region of France. But black truffles are also found during the winter months in several parts of the Northern Hemisphere, including Italy and Spain. The black winter truffle drives people wild—it has dark, robustly-veined flesh that appears almost black-purple, and has the strongest flavor and aroma of all the black truffles.

Seasonality, the difficulty of locating the truffles, and erratic weather conditions all impact the cost of truffles, making them one of the most costly ingredients in kitchens around the world.

Remarkably, even miraculously, the black winter truffle has finally been cultivated in the Southern Hemisphere. With acidic soil, cool winters and warm summers, Australia offers conditions ideal for growing truffles, at least in the identified microclimate in Western Australia where we have found a  successful truffière.

This is the holy grail of truffles.

The truffières were amply planted with oak and hazelnut trees whose roots were inoculated with truffle spores. The years of patience have been rewarded; they are now harvesting black truffles in their winter season, which is June through August. These trees are producing a steady supply of quality black winter truffles, which are located in the traditional manner, with truffle-sniffing dogs.

We are pleased to say that the Australian truffles are just as impressive as their European counterparts. It’s like Christmas in July for truffle fans, who can celebrate the extension of the season.  One way of doing that is to make Tournedos Rossini.

Recipe_Tournedos_Rossini_HomeMedium

Tournedos Rossini with Australian Black Winter Truffles

 

Save the Date: Game Dinner at Daniel

For more information, and to buy tickets, email Julia Murphy.

 jmurphy@danielnyc.com

Hunting Truffles in Italy

D’Artagnan owner Ariane Daguin recently traveled to Savigno, a small town near Bologna in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy. She was there to talk with one of our truffle suppliers about the upcoming winter truffle season and tour their new facility where truffles are inspected, graded, cleaned and sometimes made into prepared products, like peelings and butters. The small, family-owned operation is also home to a petit tartuferia where Ariane had the privilege to do a little hunting. She searched the bases of 10 year old oak and chestnut trees for tuber aestivum and with the help of a Lagotto Romagnolo dog, named Pipa, and a few of the family’s grandkids, made quite a haul. Check out the pics.

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D’Artagnan for dessert: Black Truffle Ice Cream with Truffle Honey Florentines

It’s no secret, we love to eat. And while 99% of the time you’ll find us posting about our various, in-office meaty adventures, we also make time to enjoy the sweeter treats in life. So last week, when there was a rogue truffle floating around the D’Artagnan kitchen, we put it to good use by mixing up a batch of Black Truffle Ice Cream.

While sweet fungus-studded ice cream may sound strange to some – it was absolutely delicious. The earthy truffle aroma was subtle and nicely balanced by bourbon vanilla. We started with the best vanilla ice cream recipe we know of, David Lebovitz‘s version from his brilliant book, The Perfect Scoop: Ice Creams, Sorbets, Granitas, and Sweet Accompaniments. (If you have an ice cream maker and don’t have this book – run, run, run out and get it – it’s the only one you’ll ever need!) David’s recipe starts with a traditional French custard, to which we added a couple of extra yolks. (You could actually substitute duck eggs for an even richer custard – next time!) We added a splash of the aperitif, Lacheze Liqueur a la Truffe, a holiday gift from Chef David Malbequi. We crowned the finished glace with crisp, truffle honey Florentine cookies which we adapted from Martha Stewart’s Cookies book. Very, very good and super easy. Recipe is after the jump… Read more

No-Fail Thanksgiving Side! Garlicky Truffle Mashed Potatoes

Here’s a super easy recipe to add to your holiday repertoire – Garlicky Truffle Butter Mashed Potatoes. Last week we gave you the recipe for garlic confit, an indispensable French pantry staple, and talked about the importance of truffle butter. Now we’re bringing it all together in an easy yet impressive recipe. If you’re feeling “extra rich,” as Ariane likes to say, add a flurry of paper thin slices of fresh white truffle upon serving, and watch your guests’ jaws drop.

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Holiday Workhorse: Black Truffle Butter

Black… truffle… butter. The words alone have the power to induce salivation. And while black truffle butter is a year-round kitchen staple, it’s versatility is especially appreciated during the holidays. From passed hors d’oeuvres to plated appetizers and all the way through the main event – truffle butter plays an essential role in our Thanksgiving feast. In this holiday video, Ariane demonstrates how to slide disks of the earthy, creamy concoction under the skin of a turkey before roasting for an out-of-this-world delicious bird.

Upcoming Event: Game Dinner at Daniel

For more information, and to buy tickets, click here. Update: As of 10/28/11 this event is sold out.