Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘buy d’artagnan’

A Kinder, Gentler Way to Raise Chickens?

The New York Times recently reported that Perdue is making changes in how they raise chickens. They will overhaul animal welfare practices, making their plants more humane to give the birds better lives. It’s good to see one of the largest chicken producers in the nation talking about changes, however small they may be.

At D’Artagnan we have been advocates of humane animal husbandry for over 30 years. We have always supported and partnered with small farms that actually raise animals the most humane way, without antibiotics or added hormones, and at a slower pace.  We’ve been doing this since day one. In fact, our organic chicken was the first on the market – before the USDA had clear protocols in place for organic labeling.

Check out Eater’s article and interview with Ariane on this subject, excerpted below.

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK…

  • How do you feel about Perdue’s announcement?
  • Do you think that real change can come from the massive factory farms?

Share your thoughts with a comment below.

Eater Chickens Perdue Article

Ariane Daguin, CEO and founder of D’Artagnan (an organic meat purveyor), says the labels slapped on meat have become diluted over time, largely due to the influence of the meat lobby. “Big factory farmers that say they produce organic chicken today often simply buy ‘organic’ grain from China — which isn’t even organic by U.S. standards. They can also tout that chickens have access to the outside —  but it’s usually one little door for 100,000 chickens.”

Daguin says the labels are confusing for consumers and “infuriating” for a company like D’Artagnan, which sells organic products at a higher price point than companies like Perdue. Though D’Artagnan and Perdue products might have similar labels, Daguin says her company holds its processes to a higher standard. “When people read the word ‘organic,’ the perception is that it’s a small family farm and the growers respect the animals,” she says. “I wish I could put, ‘more organic than the other guy’ on my product. Labels don’t necessarily mean the same thing for me and for Mr. Perdue, I guess.”

 

Meat and Fruit: Made for Each Other

You may not automatically consider meat and fruit to be perfect flavor companions. But think of classic dishes like lemon-pepper chicken, duck à l’orange, turkey with cranberry sauce, and pork with apples. These familiar meat-and-fruit pairings are just the tip of the culinary iceberg.

Read on to see how fruit can make a magical accompaniment for meat – from game to poultry and everyday favorites like pork. Summer is the right time to pick up seasonal fruit at the farmer’s market and pair it with meat.

french ham & pear recipes preview

French Ham & Pear Crostini with Truffle Honey – recipe at dartagnan.com

Here are some guidelines for creating tasty meat and fruit combinations:

  • VENISON:  a good match for apples, cherries, raspberries, cranberries, citrus fruits, peaches, pears, raisins, pomegranates, and dates.
  • RABBIT: the subtle flavor is enhanced by apples, currants, citrus fruits, plums, and prunes.
  • LAMB: stands up to both fresh and dried fruits with bold flavors, like apricots, cranberries, dates, figs, pomegranates, prunes, and raisins.
  • CHICKEN: plays well with others, including fruits like apples, apricots, cranberries, currants, grapes, citrus fruits, mangoes, peaches, pears, and raisins.
  • SQUAB: often paired with cherries, figs, lemons, pears, and prunes, or fig balsamic vinegar.
  • DUCK: made to pair with fruits. Go wild: try blueberries, cherries, cranberries, apricots, currants, dates, figs, citrus fruits, mangoes, peaches, pears, pomegranates, prunes, or grapes.
  • PORK: friendly to fruits like apples, cranberries, currants, dried cherries, dried figs, mangoes, quince, plums, pineapple, pears, peaches, and apricots. In summer, try grilling stone fruits like peaches, and serving with grilled pork chops.
  • FOIE GRAS: an all-time fruit lover. Its buttery flavor is balanced by all kinds of fruits, like apples, apricots, cherries, cranberries, dried figs, grapes, grapefruit, lemons, mangoes, papayas, peaches, pears, plums, raisins, and strawberries.
  • CHARCUTERIE: cured meats go well with fruit – try pears, apples, grapes, fresh or dried figs, apricots or cherries on your charcuterie board. Wrap jambon de Bayonne around melon in summer for a refreshing snack.
duck-breasts-with-honey-citrus-sauce

Duck Breasts with Citrus-Honey Sauce – recipe at dartagnan.com

Share your meat and fruit creations with us on social media! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. We love to see what’s cooking.

Why Let Meat Rest?

Let it Rest!

This could be the D’Artagnan motto. Whether it’s a ribeye, skirt steak, duck breast or pork chop, all meat needs to rest after it is cooked.

Kalbi Style Grilled Buffalo Steak

Buffalo steak recipe at dartagnan.com

Cook the meat on a grill or cast iron skillet until it has reached your preferred level of doneness.

Then be patient and let the meat rest. Ten minutes on a plate, tented with foil in a warm spot does the job. But why is that rest period so darn important? Read more

Let’s Eat … Brunch at Home

Love it or hate it, brunch is a Sunday ritual that is not going away. Late breakfast, early lunch … what better way to celebrate the leisure of a Sunday?

Check out this illustrated history of brunch … which traces brunch from a gentlemanly breakfast after the early morning hunt, to Prohibition (you knew there would be alcohol), the mainstream IHOPs with stacks of pancakes and ultimately to the gentrified neighborhoods of our cities. And the resulting brunch backlash.

No need to wait on a long line. Mix yourself a Bloody Mary, and make something for brunch at home…read on for our ideas and recipes below.

Portlandia Brunch Line

The long line for brunch.  Portlandia: Brunch Village episode.  Still via paulgerald.com.

Read more

Seeing Stars: What is the Michelin Guide?

Have you ever wondered about the Michelin Guide and its stars? The Guide (pronounced geed in French) gives out stars from 1 to 3 when it reviews restaurants; this is the most prestigious rating that a restaurant can get. The acquisition or loss of a star can have dramatic effects on the success of a restaurant. See the entertaining film The Hundred-Foot Journey to see what restaurants will do to keep their stars. So what do the stars represent?

One star: “A very good restaurant in its category”

Two stars:  “Excellent cooking, worth a detour”

Three stars: “Exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey”

745966_1fe573f0_m

A Little History of the Guide

The Michelin Guide actually started as a way to sell more tires. By 1900 the tire makers André and Édouard Michelin had been in business for 11 years, primarily making bicycle tires. They were ready for the automobile age, even though they had a very limited audience for their car tires. There were only 3,000 cars in all of France at the time! In order to encourage use, and wear and tear on the tires, the brothers hit on a brilliant idea: write a guide book for hotels and restaurants that would entice motorists to make some road trips.

The original Michelin Guides were free and contained maps, instructions for changing and repairing tires, lists of mechanics, gas stations and other useful information for travelers.

Aventure Michelin - Clermont-Ferrand - 30/01/2012 - photos Bastien et François BAUDIN / Agence AUSTRAL

Aventure Michelin – Clermont-Ferrand – 30/01/2012 – photos Bastien et François BAUDIN / Agence AUSTRAL

Read more

Top 7 Chicken Recipes You Need to Try

Tired of the same old, same old when it comes to chicken? You are not alone! Americans consume 90 pounds of chicken per capita each year, and we suspect that much of that is chicken breasts.

How to jazz up your chicken dinner? Start with quality chicken, choose whole chicken or different cuts (sorry, boneless skinless chicken breast!), and try one of these recipes.

1. Black Truffle Butter Buffalo Wings

Oh, yes we did. Take a classic dish with lots of hot sauce and add the miracle of black truffle butter, and you get our “truffalo” chicken wings recipe.  Don’t relegate chicken wings to game day – they make a perfectly good meal anytime of the year.

Truffalo Wings 5

Read more

Do You Know the Alternate Names for these Steaks?

Love a good steak? We know the feeling.  And in order to meet your steak expectations, we just added new cuts to our website. Until recently, these were only offered to our chef clients, so it’s a good day for the home cook.

Did we mention that these are fresh steaks – not frozen? That is pretty unusual in the world wide web of steaks.

Grass-Fed Filet Mignon AKA The Barrel Cut

Eight ounces of tender beef, barrel cut from the meatiest part of the tenderloin.  That’s why we only get 3 filets from every tenderloin.

Two inches thick and ready for a hot pan. But don’t cook it too long; this steak is better on the rare side. Available fresh, individually sealed, in packs of 10. Your grass-fed steak dreams come true.

BEEAUS040-1_VA0_SQ

Filet Mignon

New York Strip Steak AKA Kansas City Steak

Enter the controversy: NYC vs. Kansas City. There is only one winner, and it’s you, with 16 ounces of tender and marbled steak. Available fresh, in packs of 10, and perfect for the busy summer grilling season.

Pasture-Raised Beef NY Strip Steak, Bone-In

NY Strip Steak, Bone-In

Read more

8 Ways to Mix Up Your Grilling Routine

Bored with the same old stuff on the grill? Mix up your grilling routine and try some of our protein alternatives to shake things up! Summer is the perfect time to upgrade your grill game and try new things.

1. Burgers

If you normally grill burgers, try… buffalo burgers. An easy switch! Try our recipe and top your buffalo burger with mushrooms.

Recipe_Mushroom_Lovers_Burger_HomeMedium

Read more

How To Build a Better Cheeseburger

Burgers. We all love ’em, right? And with the summer season underway, we can expect to eat a lot of hamburgers.

While there’s something to be said for sticking with the classics, sometimes you feel like shaking up the burger routine. Go ahead – get adventurous! The burger makes an excellent blank canvas (try a buffalo burger for the patty). Here are some ideas for using cheese to take the great American burger from humble to haute.

buffalo-bleu-cheese-burger-recipe_CAPT

Cheese, Please!

Getting tired of that same old slice? Try using cheeses with a little panache.

  • English Stilton or Roquefort add a tangy kick.
  • Fontina, havarti and gouda are buttery, smooth and melt beautifully on burgers.
  • Craving creamy? A thick slice of pungent Taleggio, Coulommiers or triple-cream Brillat-Savarin should do the trick.
  • Creamy burrata is mild, milky and decadent on a burger.
  • Herbed chèvre adds a tart pop of flavor and pairs will with bitter greens like arugula.
  • Add crunch with a cheese crisp, or frico – Parmigiano-Reggiano, Mimolette, and manchego are all good cheeses for making frico.
Coulommiers au lait cru

Coulommiers cheese. Photo: Myrabella / Wikimedia Commons / CC-BY-SA-3.0 & GFDL 

Super Frico

How to make a frico crisp: sprinkle ¼ cup of finely shredded cheese in a circle shape (the same diameter of your hamburger bun) on a non-stick baking sheet, and bake in a 375 degree F oven until the cheese melts and begins to turn golden. Let it cool and firm up for a few minutes before using. Crunch, crunch!

Make This Burger Now!

Try our recipe for wagyu and veal sliders with burrata cheese … lots of basil and a creamy aioli add flavor. This could be summer’s biggest burger hit.

Caprese burger sliders with wagyu beef, veal and burrata

Caprese burger sliders with wagyu beef, veal and burrata cheese

Shop dartagnan.com for wagyu beef, pasture-raised beef, and buffalo for your burgers this season. And check our burger recipes for more inspiration.

If you make the perfect burger be sure to share it with us on social media. Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Is Your Olive Oil the Real Thing?

You may have read about the olive oil scandals in recent years.  If not, you better sit down.

Even if labeled so, EVOO is not always extra virgin, and sometimes it’s not even olive oil. Adulterated with cheap canola or sunflower oil, many of the widely-available brands are simply not the real thing. And worse, the criminal world has gotten involved in the olive oil business, which was reported by CBS News 60 Minutes.

Tom Mueller wrote a whole book on the subject, in which he reveals that 70% of extra virgin olive oil sold is not what it claims to be. Authentic EVOO takes a lot of time, labor and money to make properly, and it’s quicker, cheaper and easier to fake it. His website has fascinating information about olive oil, if you want to learn more. 

MBEVO002-1_VA0_SQ

How to tell if your olive oil is the real deal:

Even experts can have a hard time discerning the difference. But here are a few things you can check.

Is your olive oil in a clear glass bottle?

Not a good sign. When exposed to light and heat, olive oil degrades fast. Look for dark glass bottles which protect the olive oil from going rancid.

Is your olive oil from a small producer or a massive conglomerate?

Small producers are a better choice when seeking quality olive oil, but they are harder to find, and you will pay more.

Does your olive oil have an expiration date?

Olive oil should be consumed within two years of bottling for best flavor and quality. Olive oil is a lipid, and can go rancid.

Does your olive oil solidify at cold temperatures?

Put your EVOO in the refrigerator and see if it becomes thick and cloudy. If not, then you have a fake.

Will your olive oil burn?

EVOO should be flammable enough to keep an oil lamp burning. Although this and the fridge test are not foolproof, they are good indicators of authenticity.

Know your maker

And one of the best ways to know that your EVOO is real is to source from a small grower and mill that you know –  like we do with our Reserve Jean Reno olive oil. It is made in the Maussane-les-Alpilles region of Provence in France, which is historically known for olive oil. It’s also right in Jean’s backyard.

Jean Reno signs bottles of his olive oil in Ariane's office.

Jean Reno signs bottles of his olive oil in Ariane’s office.

Check the Chicago Tribune article on how to buy olive oil, in which Chef Carrie Nahabedian, of Naha and Brindille restaurants in Chicago, recommends our Reserve Jean Reno Olive Oil. Thanks for the shout out, Chef Carrie!

Did you know? There are over 700 different types of olives that make thousands of types of oils around the world! Look for what types of olives are used in your favorite oils. Get to know their flavor notes, and pair oils with food. Think of them as you would grape varietals of your favorite wines.

Shop dartagnan.com – the only place in the United State to purchase Jean Reno’s favorite olive oils.