Skip to content

Posts tagged ‘buy d’artagnan’

What Does Mise en Place Mean?

Mise en place (pronounced meez ahn plas) is a French cooking term that literally translates to “put in place.” Often referred to as simply “meez” by the pros.

Mise en place allows you to cook in the most efficient way, without having to stop. All necessary ingredients are chopped and ready to go, spices are measured, oil is portioned, tools are at hand.

Mise en Place Video Shoot

Ready to cook!

Read more

Make this Shakshuka Recipe Now!

What is shakshuka anyway? And why is everyone talking about it? It is just eggs poached in tomato sauce, versions of which can be found in cultures around the world: North Africa, Italy, Israel, Turkey, and Mexico – and they’re all delicious!

Discover for yourself why this poached egg dish is the current darling of the food world with our shakshuka recipe. Though traditional recipes do not include sausage, we had to add some meat.  It’s what we do. Our andouille sausage adds richness and spice, but you could swap in lamb merguez for a more North African flavor. Cook the sausages first, and drain off any excess fat.

This hearty dish is great for breakfast, lunch, or dinner; serve it family-style, or individually in 6” skillets, if you’ve got them.  And if you want to do brunch Middle Eastern style, serve hummus and/or baba ganoush on the side. A shepherd’s salad with feta cheese, olives and pickled turnips, and a dollop of labneh (thick yogurt) make great accompaniments. And of course, you should have freshly warmed – not toasted – pita bread, kept soft enough to scoop up all the tomato sauce and dips.

Shakshuka Version 2

Click for the full recipe. And if you make shakshuka, please share photos with us.  We love to see what’s cooking! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram.

 

It’s Roast Leg of Lamb Day!

We don’t know why this food holiday is on May 7th, but any day that celebrates roasting a leg of lamb is a good one.

To us, bone-in leg of lamb is proof that meat really does taste best when roasted on the bone. It’s a classic preparation, and easy to do.

Just rub with fresh rosemary and garlic for savory and herbaceous flavor. Pop the leg of lamb in the oven and baste a few times. You’ll end up with a gorgeous roast that will draw “oohs” and “aahs.”

But the real pleasure comes when you eat it. Mild and meltingly tender, each mouthful of lamb is a flavor revelation.

Try our recipe for Herb Roasted Leg of Lamb with Port Wine Truffle Sauce, pictured below, for a special occasion dinner.

Tip: Don’t put cold lamb from the refrigerator directly into the oven. Remove the lamb from the refrigerator and leave at room temperature about 30 minutes before prepping.  

roast-leg-of-lamb-holiday-recipe

About Our Lamb

D’Artagnan grass-fed lamb is raised humanely using traditional methods in the range lands of Australia. In keeping with our principles, lamb is free from antibiotics and hormones. The stress-free environment produces tender and mild meat, proving that the best practices can be tasted on the plate. Learn about lamb by reading our article.

Fun Lamb Fact: Americans eat less than one pound of lamb per person annually. Compare that to annual consumption of lamb in Australia and New Zealand: 26 and 25 pound per person, respectively.

 

 

Best Food Photo of the Year

The Pink Lady® Food Photographer of the Year for 2016 has been announced. There were 7,000 images from around the world competing for top honors. It must be hungry work judging all those photos!

This is the first place winner – an action photo of a baker in a flour explosion.img_7449a-02-Feb-16

Do you love food – and photos of it? Have a look at the finalists. It’s not all food porn; there are markets, agriculture, animals, people eating, wine photos and more. Here are a few that we liked.

This pic from the Food Sn-apping category – any food photo, taken anytime on a mobile device – was highly commended by the judges.  A table full of poultry and meats? Could be our office.  Also, extra points for all the barding (wrapping lean meat with bacon) depicted.

miriam_ni-27-Jan-16

First place in the Food for the Family category went to this photo from Croatia. We would like to be invited to this picnic. Look at the basket, real glasses and red wine, plus a sumptuous spread of meats, fruit, sandwiches … and is that a pomegranate? Nicely done.

picnic-07-Feb-16

This Peruvian photo got high commendations in Food Adventures category. Lovely lady butchers at work, breaking down primal cuts at the market – we like it!perumarke-20-Jan-16

Highly commended among Food in the Field photos, this mushroom pic is simply stunning in its level of detail.  Elegance, mystery and beauty – that’s the world of fungi.pink_lady-28-Aug-15

Check out this photo by Jasper Callis in the Young (11-14) category. This young man snapped this brace of pheasants at a hunt in the UK, a scene we appreciate because we offer Scottish game birds just like these during the season.

finished_-07-Feb-16

There is also a Food in Film category, so have a look at the finalists – you may find your next Netflix choice there.

If you take photos of your culinary adventures with D’Artagnan products, be sure to share with us! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram so we can see your food photos and applaud your efforts.

6 Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes

Are you doing brunch for Mother’s Day? Mix up a Mimosa, Bloody Mary, or maybe pop the cork on a bottle of bubbly… this brunch is about to get interesting.

If you are cooking at home for the mom in your life (or moms – hey, multi-generational brunch sounds great!), try one of our exclusive recipes. Developed and tested by our expert staff, these recipes include the sweet and the savory, so there’s something for every taste. You could call it the recipe for a memorable Mother’s Day brunch.

1. Dutch Baby Pancake with Candied Bacon

candied-bacon-dutch-baby-recipe

The Dutch baby is having a moment right now. Part pancake, part custard, part soufflé, and totally delicious, the Dutch baby is simple and fun to make. Which is why it’s the perfect choice for Mother’s Day brunch. Our recipe has candied bacon, because, well … we love bacon. This bacon-rich Dutch baby is what brunch dreams are made of. Best part? It’s ridiculously easy to make and comes together quickly. Mom will be impressed. Read more

Top 5 Mother’s Day Meals

Are you are staying in for Mother’s Day and cooking a special meal? We think it’s a lovely way to spend time with Mom and the family. The extra effort will certainly be appreciated. And there will be no waiting in line at the brunch place, where everyone and their mother will be…

But what to cook? Her favorites?  Or something new and exciting? Here are a few recipes we like for a Mother’s Day meal.

1. Parmesan-Crusted Veal Chops with Creamy Lemon-Herb Sauceparmesan-veal-chops-milanese-recipe

Double or triple this veal recipe, depending on how many are coming to dinner.  That’s easy to do, because this simple veal dish comes together quickly. Packed with flavor, and finished with a lovely Parmesan crust, it’s sure to be a hit with the family. Fines herbes and lemon zest keep the creamy pan sauce fresh and light. Read more

Perfect Mother’s Day Brunch: Waffles … or Foie-ffles

What’s better than chicken & waffles? Foie gras & waffles, bien sûr! Our recipe for foie-ffles (yeah, we made up that word) combines seared foie gras with fresh strawberry waffles, strawberry sauce, and tart balsamic syrup. They’re perfect for a special occasion brunch … let’s say for Mother’s Day.

Don’t be nervous about searing foie gras for this recipe. It’s easy as can be, and takes very little time.

Watch Anito Lo and our own Ariane sear foie gras in this video to see for yourself. If you can sear a steak in a pan, this will be a breeze.

In fact, the strawberry waffles are more complicated than the foie gras in this recipe. But we know you can handle those, too.

Foie-ffles: Strawberry Waffles with Seared Foie Gras & Balsamic Syrup

foie-gras-strawberry-waffles-recipe
Ingredients

FOR THE STRAWBERRY SAUCE

1 pound strawberries, hulled and diced
½ cup sugar
½ teaspoon vanilla
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice

FOR THE WAFFLES

About 12 ripe strawberries, hulled and diced
2 tablespoons sugar, divided use
1 teaspoon Grand Marnier (optional)
1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon kosher salt
3 large eggs
1¼ cups plus 2 tablespoons buttermilk
1 teaspoon vanilla
½ cup unsalted butter (1 stick), melted, plus 4 tablespoons, melted, for the waffle iron

FOR THE FOIE GRAS

8 Individually Quick Frozen Foie Gras Medallions
Fine salt (we like Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt)
Balsamic Syrup

Preparation

  1. Make the strawberry sauce: In a medium saucepan over medium high heat, combine strawberries, ½ cup sugar, ½ teaspoon vanilla, and 2 teaspoons lemon juice. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Cook until strawberries are very soft. Carefully add strawberries to a blender and puree until completely smooth. Pour sauce back into the saucepan and bring back up to a boil, cooking for about 3 minutes until sauce starts to thicken. Keep warm.

2. Make the waffles: Set aside 2 nice strawberries for garnish. Dice remaining strawberries and add to a bowl with 1 tablespoon sugar and Grand Marnier, if using. Stir then let strawberries macerate at room temperature for about 20 minutes.

3. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and remaining tablespoon sugar. In a small bowl, whisk together eggs, buttermilk, and vanilla. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and whisk just until the mixture comes together. Fold in the macerated strawberries and 1 teaspoon of their juice along with the melted butter. Cover and let the batter rest at room temperature for about 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 200 degrees F.

5. Heat waffle iron according to the manufacturer’s directions. Brush with melted butter and ladle batter onto the iron. Close the cover, and cook until crisp. Repeat. Transfer waffles to baking pan fitted with a rack and keep warm in the oven.

6. Prepare the foie gras: Heat a dry skillet over high flame. Using a sharp paring knife, score the foie gras in a crosshatch pattern. Season with salt. When the pan is very hot, add the foie gras and lower the heat to medium-high. Sear until the foie gras slices are dark brown. Turn them over and cook on the other side until fully cooked but still soft to the touch, basting a few times with rendered foie gras fat. Set foie gras slices on a paper towel to drain.

7. To serve: Pool strawberry sauce in the center of a plate. Place a warm waffle on top, off-center. Top with foie gras slices. Drizzle with balsamic syrup, garnish with half of a reserved strawberry. (To make balsamic “hearts” like we did in the above photo, instead of drizzling, place balsamic syrup in a line of dots inside the perimeter of the strawberry sauce. In a single motion, drag a toothpick through the center of each dot.) Serve.

If you make foie-ffles, please share photos with us on social media! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter so we can cheer your efforts!

Top 5 Recipes for Baking with Black Truffle Butter

Everyone likes baking with butter, but when you have truffle butter in the fridge, you can take it to a whole new level. Why? Well, truffles are one of the supreme luxuries in nature and the kitchen. Earthy and intoxicating, their distinctive fragrance has inspired culinary brilliance for centuries. D’Artagnan truffle butter captures the essence of the truffle, and makes it an affordable luxury that you can enjoy year-round. Our beautifully-balanced black truffle butter is made with real truffle bits and will change the way you cook…and bake.

Read on for inspiration …  and click the titles to get the recipes.

Black Truffle Parker House Rolls

Soft, squishy, golden yeast rolls are a holiday favorite but when our black truffle butter is baked right into the dough, they’re downright irresistible. But why wait for a holiday to make these tasty rolls? Dinner just got a whole lot more interesting.

black-truffle-butter-parker-house-rolls-recipe_HomeMedium

Read more

5 Duck Breast Recipes To Try Now

Every recipe has a story and Ariane, the founder of D’Artagnan, is very involved in this one.  Her father, Chef André Daguin, was the first to cook duck breast like a steak, pan-searing and serving it rare. That was back in the 1950s at his restaurant in Southwest France, and the technique caught on. Today it’s quite common to see seared duck breast on a restaurant menu.

If you haven’t tried cooking duck breast at home, we encourage you to do so.  These easy variations on the basic recipe will hopefully inspire your inner chef. Choose the flavors you like and heat up your pan!

1. The Classic: Magret Duck Breast à la D’Artagnan

This simple duck magret recipe should be a part of every home cook’s repertoire. If you can cook a steak in a pan, you can sear a duck breast. We love this simple recipe and the opportunity it affords to get creative with the pan sauce. Master this one, and you can whip up an impressive meal in 30 minutes anytime. Kitchen victories are so sweet, aren’t they?

Recipe_Magret_Dartagnan_HomeMedium

Read more

Duck Fat 50: Duck Fat Focaccia Bread with Herbs & Sea Salt

Have you baked with duck fat yet? If not, you are missing out on a whole world of flavor. Try our recipe for ridiculously delicious duck fat focaccia bread. Topped with fresh herbs and flaky salt, it’s wonderful on its own, as a soup or salad accompaniment, or as the vehicle for your favorite sandwich fillings.  Duck bacon and onion jam might work nicely. Or try spreading duck rillettes on top for a duck on duck fat sandwich.

This recipe will make one 14 x 11 inch loaf – which we predict won’t be around for long. It’s just that good.

Duck Fat Foccacia Bread

Duck Fat Focaccia Bread

Ingredients

2½ teaspoons active dry yeast
1⅔ cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
½ cup Duck Fat, melted, divided use
2 cups bread flour
2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, and/or oregano
1½ teaspoons Maldon salt, or Gros Sel

Preparation

1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, stir together yeast and warm water. Let stand about 5 minutes until foamy. Add 2 cups bread flour, 2 cups all-purpose flour, ¼ cup duck fat, and coarse salt. Beat until mixture comes together. Switch to dough hook attachment and knead on medium-low speed until dough is smooth and elastic. Finished dough should be just slightly sticky, so add additional flour a little at a time, if needed.

2. Gently round dough into a ball and place in a large bowl that’s been lightly greased with duck fat. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm location until double in size, about 1½ hours.
Generously grease a 14 x 11 inch baking pan with duck fat. Press the dough evenly into the pan and cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel. Allow to rise until doubled again, about 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F with rack in the center.

3. Using the end of a wooden spoon greased with duck fat, press deep indents into the dough at 1” intervals. Brush with remaining duck fat, allowing the fat to pool into indentations. Sprinkle herbs evenly over the dough, then repeat with Maldon salt. Bake until bread is golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes. Cool in the pan then slice and serve. Wrapped in plastic wrap, focaccia will keep for about 3 days.