What is Duck Leg Confit?

What is confit? Very simply, it is a French word meaning “preserved.” More specifically, it is a pre-refrigeration strategy for meat preservation. In this case, we are talking about duck leg; meaty, delicious, and cooked in duck fat and aromatics for hours. This makes it tender and helps to preserve the meat. Traditionally, duck leg confit…

Ariane on Vin Village Radio

  Ariane was interviewed by Rob Barnett on Vin Village recently. The show focuses on the “who’s who” in wine & food. You can find it on the wsRadio Network.   Listen in for an introduction to D’Artagnan with the lady herself. The first segment can be heard here. The second segment, in which Ariane talks quite…

Game Day Eats: Top 5 Mains for Super Sunday

Looking for game day menu ideas? A cold afternoon in February seems like the perfect time for warming, hearty dishes and you can score a touchdown with our game day recipes. Plus you can save 15% right now on both our Game Day and Charcuterie collections. Top 5 Main Dishes for Super Sunday 1. Cassoulet is…

Celebrate National Cassoulet Day

We’ve always celebrated cassoulet. Sometimes in October, sometimes in January. Last year we even had a Cassoulet War in February, with chefs competing against each other for trophies!  To us, winter is cassoulet season. Or at least it’s an excuse to eat lots of cassoulet. That’s why we are so excited about National Cassoulet Day….

Gifts for Foodies

When it comes to gifts, is there anything better than food? Not for those of us who are obsessed with all things culinary! Is there someone like that on your list? We’ve got you covered. From gift baskets and foie gras to our signature cassoulet kit, there is something for everyone at dartagnan.com.  

Pardon My Foie Gras: Between the Covers

Pardon My Foie Gras was written by the prolific cookbook author Ruth Chier Rosen, and published in 1956. You can see her astounding collection of vintage cookbooks that span decades and cuisines at her blog Food of the Fifties. She even has an app! Though a far cry from the comprehensive volumes Julia Child penned on French…

Gift Guide for the Food Lover

There is likely someone you know who is completely obsessed with food. You don’t know how they can talk about food for so long and in such detail. But they do. We exist for these folks. Variously called “foodies” (a term many dislike) or “foodists” (sounds a little more serious), these are our people. If…

Thanksgivukkah Comes But Once Every 79,000 Years

You’ve surely heard. It’s being touted by the media as a once-in-a-lifetime event. The convergence of the Jewish and Gregorian calendars brings us a hybrid holiday this year: Thanksgivukkah. Hanukkah falls early this year, with the first night of the Festival of Lights on Wednesday, November 27. And Thanksgiving is later than normal on Thursday, November…

Conquering Cassoulet

In recent years cassoulet has really taken off, and we couldn’t be happier. It’s downright common to see cassoulet on menus and in magazines these days….in all manner of variations. There’s even a recently-published book of essays called “The Cassoulet Saved Our Marriage.”  We don’t promise cassoulet miracles, but we can help to dispel your fears…

Ariane’s Class at Kings Cooking Studio

Ariane shared her secrets to making great cassoulet at Kings Cooking Studio in Short Hills, NJ on Monday night. But it was not just cassoulet!  Ariane talked about the simple techniques that are the backbone of the D’Artagnan lifestyle. Just the basic things a girl from Gascony knows how to do. She seared foie gras and served…

It’s National Bean Day!

We LOVE obscure food holidays. Surprisingly, there’s one for just about every day on the calendar. Our friends over at The Nibble put together a list and what do you know?! Today is National Bean Day – the perfect day to enjoy our versatile French Coco Tarbais Beans. The Coco Tarbais bean is one of the great exports of…

Cassoulet 101

Perhaps there is no dish in Southwest France more iconic, cherished, and controversial than the cassoulet. The name cassoulet comes from the word cassole, referring to the traditional, conical clay pot in which it is cooked (and which the potters of the village of Issel perfected). Cassoulet was originally a food of peasants–a simple assemblage…