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Posts tagged ‘charcuterie’

20-Minute Dinner: Duck Bacon Carbonara

Are you cooking with duck bacon? If not, you are missing out.

The heady smokey flavor of duck bacon pairs well with pasta, especially when dressed with a creamy sauce. Our duck bacon carbonara (recipe below) is rich, indulgent and deeply satisfying – plus it’s done in under 30 minutes. Perfect for a weeknight dinner.

For a variation, try chopped duck bacon with penne, green peas, sautéed shallots and homemade vodka sauce, or simply tossed with halved cherry tomatoes, fresh basil, olive oil and orecchiette for a light, summer supper.

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Duck Bacon Carbonara

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It’s Bastille Day!

Happy Bastille Day! Bonne fête! Joyeux Quatorze Juillet! 

What is the holiday all about? It commemorates the storming of the Bastille prison on July 14 during the bloody revolution of 1789 – the one where all the aristocrats lost their heads.

Get the history here – and see how the French celebrate their day of independence.

At D’Artagnan, Bastille Day means pétanque, Pastis and lamb merguez sausage. Read on to see how Ariane celebrates Bastille Day.

A French classic: lamb merguez sausage dressed with mustard

A French classic: lamb merguez sausage dressed with mustard

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Chefs of Betony Come to Visit

We are always happy to have visitors at our Union, NJ office. When Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony in NYC made the trip, along with two chefs from his kitchen, he came bearing gifts.

From left to right: Alex, Pierre, Chef Bryce, Ariane, John, Chef Jack.

The first was an autographed dish for the wall of plates in our dining hall. The message reads: “Dear Ariane, Thank you for being one of our partners in greatness for many years, and for many more to come.  -Bryce and the team at Betony.”

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A dish from the team at Betony that will hang on our wall of plates in the dining hall.

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The Whole Foie Gras Duck

Ariane was honored to be a guest lecturer at the Institute of Culinary Education in NYC last week. Ariane is committed to educating and supporting the next generation of chefs, and she enjoys going to culinary schools to share her experience and wisdom. This time she demonstrated breaking down a whole duck – with the foie gras inside – and talked about the uses for each part.

The beak-to-tail philosophy means that we eat the whole duck, and waste nothing. From duck breast to duck leg confit, duck pâtémousse and duck fat … we enjoy every tasty bit.  The liver may be the big prize, but every part is valued. Even the bones are used to make demi-glace.

Ariane starts with the whole duck, foie gras and all.

Ariane starts with the whole duck, foie gras and all.

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Let’s Eat … Brunch at Home

Love it or hate it, brunch is a Sunday ritual that is not going away. Late breakfast, early lunch … what better way to celebrate the leisure of a Sunday?

Check out this illustrated history of brunch … which traces brunch from a gentlemanly breakfast after the early morning hunt, to Prohibition (you knew there would be alcohol), the mainstream IHOPs with stacks of pancakes and ultimately to the gentrified neighborhoods of our cities. And the resulting brunch backlash.

No need to wait on a long line. Mix yourself a Bloody Mary, and make something for brunch at home…read on for our ideas and recipes below.

Portlandia Brunch Line

The long line for brunch.  Portlandia: Brunch Village episode.  Still via paulgerald.com.

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Duck Fat 50: Duck Fat Focaccia Bread with Herbs & Sea Salt

Have you baked with duck fat yet? If not, you are missing out on a whole world of flavor. Try our recipe for ridiculously delicious duck fat focaccia bread. Topped with fresh herbs and flaky salt, it’s wonderful on its own, as a soup or salad accompaniment, or as the vehicle for your favorite sandwich fillings.  Duck bacon and onion jam might work nicely. Or try spreading duck rillettes on top for a duck on duck fat sandwich.

This recipe will make one 14 x 11 inch loaf – which we predict won’t be around for long. It’s just that good.

Duck Fat Foccacia Bread

Duck Fat Focaccia Bread

Ingredients

2½ teaspoons active dry yeast
1⅔ cup warm water (about 110 degrees F)
½ cup Duck Fat, melted, divided use
2 cups bread flour
2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more as needed
2 teaspoons coarse salt
2 tablespoons chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme, rosemary, and/or oregano
1½ teaspoons Maldon salt, or Gros Sel

Preparation

1. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, stir together yeast and warm water. Let stand about 5 minutes until foamy. Add 2 cups bread flour, 2 cups all-purpose flour, ¼ cup duck fat, and coarse salt. Beat until mixture comes together. Switch to dough hook attachment and knead on medium-low speed until dough is smooth and elastic. Finished dough should be just slightly sticky, so add additional flour a little at a time, if needed.

2. Gently round dough into a ball and place in a large bowl that’s been lightly greased with duck fat. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm location until double in size, about 1½ hours.
Generously grease a 14 x 11 inch baking pan with duck fat. Press the dough evenly into the pan and cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel. Allow to rise until doubled again, about 1 hour.
Preheat oven to 425 degrees F with rack in the center.

3. Using the end of a wooden spoon greased with duck fat, press deep indents into the dough at 1” intervals. Brush with remaining duck fat, allowing the fat to pool into indentations. Sprinkle herbs evenly over the dough, then repeat with Maldon salt. Bake until bread is golden brown, about 25 to 30 minutes. Cool in the pan then slice and serve. Wrapped in plastic wrap, focaccia will keep for about 3 days.

5 Favorite Charcuterie Recipes

Are you cooking with charcuterie? You might be doing it and not even thinking about it. Bacon and eggs…pizza with sausage or pepperoni…stuffing with sausage. All are examples of using charcuterie in everyday food.

Charcuterie – smoked, cured or cooked meat – is showing up everywhere. At D’Artagnan, we’ve been making charctuerie for more than 30 years, with time-honored techniques, recipes and all-natural ingredients. We offer a full range of styles and flavors, and our charcuterie is a favorite among restaurants, retailers, and home cooks.

So we take charcuterie pretty seriously, and we like to find new ways to enjoy it. Here are a few of our favorite recipes featuring charcuterie. We hope you will try some of them.

Fig & Prosciutto Tart

Our tart is as easy to make as it is beautiful and delicious. In this recipe, salty French prosciutto (we call it Jambon de Bayonne) pairs perfectly with creamy mascarpone and sweet figs. If figs aren’t in season, replace them with ripe stone fruits for equally tasty results. Served at room temperature, this tart is ideal for a party, picnic, or decadent snack anytime.

prosciutto-fig-tart-recipe

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What is Duck Leg Confit?

What is confit? Very simply, it is a French word meaning “preserved.” More specifically, it is a pre-refrigeration strategy for meat preservation. In this case, we are talking about duck leg; meaty, delicious, and cooked in duck fat and aromatics for hours. This makes it tender and helps to preserve the meat.

Traditionally, duck leg confit would be stored in jars of duck fat, with a layer of pork fat on top for good measure. These pots of confit would make it through winter in a cool basement or root cellar. Today it is kept in vacuum-sealed bags in the refrigerator, but the flavor is just as satisfying.Duck Leg Confit - Plated

In the early days of D’Artagnan duck was the first product we sold. In our “everything but the quack” philosophy, we put each part to good use. Along with foie gras and duck breast, the moulard duck provides hefty legs that lend themselves to confit… and plenty of duck fat for cooking them. And so we started making vats of duck confit!

Technically speaking, duck confit falls in the broad and glorious category that is charcuterie. All smoked, cured, and cooked meats belong there; your favorites like bacon, ham, salami, prosciutto are all charcuterie. Read more

How to Assemble a Cheese and Charcuterie Board

When it’s time to plan a party, we always vote for a charcuterie board. This platter of smoked, cured and cooked meats is perfect for a pre-dinner spread, small bites and cocktails, or even for a football viewing party. But we love cheese almost as much as charcuterie, so it seemed natural to pair them and make one big, fantastically tasty platter.

We highly recommend you try this at home. No need to overthink it! Parties are fun – and cheese and charcuterie should be, too. Just read our primer and then get creative with your own pairings. All of the items and flavors work well together, so you can’t go wrong.

We’ve divided the board into 5 stacks, or suites. You can pick one or two columns in our pairing and recreate them for a small board. Or expand your selection as needed for a larger  board.

The nice thing about all this variety is that your guests can mix and match to create new combinations, or nibble on the items they like best. There’s something for everyone here.

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Enter for a Chance to Win $250 Shopping Spree!

We’re having a giveaway – and the big prize is a $250 shopping spree at dartagnan.com!

What’s on your wish list? How about $250 worth of charcuterie and foie gras? Invite your friends and break out a good bottle (or two) of red wine.

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Or maybe a big, juicy heritage ham – you could entertain a crowd, or get several meals out of this ham. Plus you can use the bone for split pea or lentil soup.

smoked-ham-with-apricot-ginger-glaze-recipe

Are you wild about Wagyu beef? Get a stack of the most tender steaks ever and plan a special dinner. What about our pasture-raised beef? From filet mignon to ribeye steak, there is a cut for every beef lover. Plus incredibly tasty ground beef that’s ideal for burger season.

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You could try our exclusive Green Circle Chicken, which is vegetable-fed, free-ranged and beloved by many of the best chefs in the United States…and it made an appearance on Mike Rowe’s CNN show “Somebody’s Gotta Do It.”

DArtagnan Green Circle Chicken Roasted 2

Any way you cut it, there is something wonderful to eat at dartagnan.com. And you could get a free lunch, dinner, brunch and breakfast if you win our giveaway. Enter here for your chance.