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Posts tagged ‘d’artagnan recipes’

Win Big in our Spicy Giveaway!

11916097_890403790995674_6317405269947769655_nThis is the season to season! Enter our Spice Up Your Summer Giveaway for a chance to win 5 types of D’Artagnan meats (value: $300+), PLUS 10 tins of organic spice blends from our friends at Teeny Tiny Spice Company (value: $99.50).

Our prize package includes meats that are great for grilling, and ideal for outdoor dinner parties: 2 racks of lamb, 4 NY strip steaks, 4 Berkshire pork chops, 4 packs of organic chicken thighs, and 4 Pekin duck breasts. Plenty to share!

Because the best meats deserve the best spices, the winner will also receive 10 tins of Teeny Tiny Spice Company’s organic spice blends (pictured below): Shepherd Herb Mix, Harissa, Montréal Seasoning, Ethiopian Berberé, Perfection Spice Rub, Szechuan Spice, Jamaican Jerk, Tandoori Masala, Hot Italian Spice and Vindaloo. It’s like traveling the world in your kitchen.

Thora, the owner of Teeny Tiny Spice Company, offered the pairings below, but there is no reason to limit yourself – all the spice blends are delicious and work with any of our meats.

Cooking with D’Artagnan and Teeny Tiny Spices? Be sure to share your results with us on social media! Tag @dartagnanfoods and @teenytinyspice on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to show off your culinary creations.

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chicken-slice

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Entries must be received by 11:59 PM EDT,  July 31, 2016. One entry per email address. No purchase required. Official rules at dartagnan.com.

What is in that Hummus?

Chestnuts.

In our recipe, these meaty nuts take the place of chickpeas for a richer flavor and creamier texture than traditional hummus. Easy to whip up for a party, a snack, or a summer evening supper when it’s too hot to cook, this chestnut hummus recipe is a keeper.

Imported from France, D’Artagnan chestnuts are fully-cooked, vacuum-sealed and ready-to-eat, which makes them easy to use in recipes.

In Southwest France chestnuts are a favorite ingredient, and have long been used to make cakes and breads. Today many gluten-free bakers are discovering that chestnut pureé and chestnut flour can be used in place of wheat flour.

Secret Ingredient Chestnuts

Chestnut Hummus Recipe

Our hummus recipe pretty much follows the traditional chickpea version, with the exception of the chestnuts. Liberal use of good olive oil gives hummus dimension, while garlic, tahini, lemon juice, and spices provide tangy flavor notes.

chestnut-hummus-recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 packs of Ready-to-Use Chestnuts
  • 3/4 cup tahini paste
  • 2 large garlic cloves
  • ¾ -1 cup water
  • Juice of 1 large lemon
  • 1/2 cup Jean Reno Black Fruity Olive Oil, plus some for drizzling
  • 1 tsp cumin
  • ½ – 1 tsp chile powder, to taste
  • ¼ tsp smoked paprika for topping
  • ½ tsp sumac plus ¼ tsp for topping
  • 1 tsp chopped flat-leaf parsley
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

Preparation

  1. Rinse, dry and then finely chop parsley and set aside.
  2. Add all remaining ingredients to a food processor or blender. Pureé until smooth. If the hummus is too thick, add more water until desired consistency is reached.
  3. Place in a shallow bowl. Top with a drizzle of olive oil, sprinkle smoked paprika, sumac and chopped parsley in circular patterns before serving. Serve with crudités, pita bread, tortilla chips, or your favorite hummus accompaniment.

Health Nuts

Did you know that chestnuts are packed vitamin C, potassium, copper and magnesium, amino acids, antioxidants, and have high levels of essential fatty acids? More comparable nutritionally to a sweet potato, sweet corn or a plantain than to other nuts and seeds, chestnuts also have folates, like all those leafy greens they keep telling you to eat.

If you make our chestnut hummus recipe, or anything else with D’Artagnan ingredients, be sure to share pictures with us on social media! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

20-Minute Dinner: Duck Bacon Carbonara

Are you cooking with duck bacon? If not, you are missing out.

The heady smokey flavor of duck bacon pairs well with pasta, especially when dressed with a creamy sauce. Our duck bacon carbonara (recipe below) is rich, indulgent and deeply satisfying – plus it’s done in under 30 minutes. Perfect for a weeknight dinner.

For a variation, try chopped duck bacon with penne, green peas, sautéed shallots and homemade vodka sauce, or simply tossed with halved cherry tomatoes, fresh basil, olive oil and orecchiette for a light, summer supper.

easy-duck-bacon-carbonara-recipe

Duck Bacon Carbonara

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It’s Bastille Day!

Happy Bastille Day! Bonne fête! Joyeux Quatorze Juillet! 

What is the holiday all about? It commemorates the storming of the Bastille prison on July 14 during the bloody revolution of 1789 – the one where all the aristocrats lost their heads.

Get the history here – and see how the French celebrate their day of independence.

At D’Artagnan, Bastille Day means pétanque, Pastis and lamb merguez sausage. Read on to see how Ariane celebrates Bastille Day.

A French classic: lamb merguez sausage dressed with mustard

A French classic: lamb merguez sausage dressed with mustard

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Tips for Making Steak Tartare at Home

Steak tartare is a true culinary classic, and a dining experience like no other. It is a melt-in-your-mouth delicacy made from the choicest high-quality beef steak – freshly chopped or minced, highly seasoned and enjoyed raw. The texture and mouth feel is beyond buttery, and the delicate flavor of the beef exquisite, with a balance of savory and spicy notes all smoothed perfectly with the velvet creaminess of freshly hand-made mayonnaise.

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When brought to the table already prepared steak tartare is often crowned with a beautiful golden egg yolk, accompanied by a few ingredients like capers, chopped onions and parsley, and a spicy Dijon mustard allowing you to further mix to your own preference.  Photo: Flickr, Steak Tartare, Mark Mitchell

Start with the Best

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Chefs of Betony Come to Visit

We are always happy to have visitors at our Union, NJ office. When Chef Bryce Shuman of Betony in NYC made the trip, along with two chefs from his kitchen, he came bearing gifts.

From left to right: Alex, Pierre, Chef Bryce, Ariane, John, Chef Jack.

The first was an autographed dish for the wall of plates in our dining hall. The message reads: “Dear Ariane, Thank you for being one of our partners in greatness for many years, and for many more to come.  -Bryce and the team at Betony.”

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A dish from the team at Betony that will hang on our wall of plates in the dining hall.

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Good News About Butter

We’ll just sit here with a slice of bread slathered in butter … truffle butter, of course … while science proves the point. Again.

Butter is back, and it’s safe to enjoy.

Our grandmothers and their grandmothers knew this simple fact. But it’s nice when a study can back up that old-time common sense.

The Clam Shack, Kennebunkport, Maine. How to make a lobster roll

PLOS One journal has the results of a study that included 600,000 people and concluded that eating butter is not linked to a higher risk for heart disease, and might even be protective against type 2 diabetes. Read that study here: Is Butter Back? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Butter Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Total Mortality

This goes against the longstanding advice to avoid butter because it contains saturated fat.

“This study adds to a growing understanding that saturated fats are not public health enemy number one,” said Dr. David Ludwig, an endocrinologist and a professor of nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. Check Time for the full story: The Case for Eating Butter Just Got Stronger.

So go ahead, get out the butter knife … and try some of our truffle butter recipes.

Will you be more liberal with butter because of this study? Tell us what you think by leaving a comment.

Or join the conversation on social media. Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

 

 

Meat and Fruit: Made for Each Other

You may not automatically consider meat and fruit to be perfect flavor companions. But think of classic dishes like lemon-pepper chicken, duck à l’orange, turkey with cranberry sauce, and pork with apples. These familiar meat-and-fruit pairings are just the tip of the culinary iceberg.

Read on to see how fruit can make a magical accompaniment for meat – from game to poultry and everyday favorites like pork. Summer is the right time to pick up seasonal fruit at the farmer’s market and pair it with meat.

french ham & pear recipes preview

French Ham & Pear Crostini with Truffle Honey – recipe at dartagnan.com

Here are some guidelines for creating tasty meat and fruit combinations:

  • VENISON:  a good match for apples, cherries, raspberries, cranberries, citrus fruits, peaches, pears, raisins, pomegranates, and dates.
  • RABBIT: the subtle flavor is enhanced by apples, currants, citrus fruits, plums, and prunes.
  • LAMB: stands up to both fresh and dried fruits with bold flavors, like apricots, cranberries, dates, figs, pomegranates, prunes, and raisins.
  • CHICKEN: plays well with others, including fruits like apples, apricots, cranberries, currants, grapes, citrus fruits, mangoes, peaches, pears, and raisins.
  • SQUAB: often paired with cherries, figs, lemons, pears, and prunes, or fig balsamic vinegar.
  • DUCK: made to pair with fruits. Go wild: try blueberries, cherries, cranberries, apricots, currants, dates, figs, citrus fruits, mangoes, peaches, pears, pomegranates, prunes, or grapes.
  • PORK: friendly to fruits like apples, cranberries, currants, dried cherries, dried figs, mangoes, quince, plums, pineapple, pears, peaches, and apricots. In summer, try grilling stone fruits like peaches, and serving with grilled pork chops.
  • FOIE GRAS: an all-time fruit lover. Its buttery flavor is balanced by all kinds of fruits, like apples, apricots, cherries, cranberries, dried figs, grapes, grapefruit, lemons, mangoes, papayas, peaches, pears, plums, raisins, and strawberries.
  • CHARCUTERIE: cured meats go well with fruit – try pears, apples, grapes, fresh or dried figs, apricots or cherries on your charcuterie board. Wrap jambon de Bayonne around melon in summer for a refreshing snack.
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Duck Breasts with Citrus-Honey Sauce – recipe at dartagnan.com

Share your meat and fruit creations with us on social media! Tag @dartagnanfoods on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. We love to see what’s cooking.

Why Let Meat Rest?

Let it Rest!

This could be the D’Artagnan motto. Whether it’s a ribeye, skirt steak, duck breast or pork chop, all meat needs to rest after it is cooked.

Kalbi Style Grilled Buffalo Steak

Buffalo steak recipe at dartagnan.com

Cook the meat on a grill or cast iron skillet until it has reached your preferred level of doneness.

Then be patient and let the meat rest. Ten minutes on a plate, tented with foil in a warm spot does the job. But why is that rest period so darn important? Read more

How to Make Savory Crêpes

What is a crêpe? A crêpe is a very thin pancake, which is usually stuffed and folded. Commonly found throughout France, the crêpe is a classic at brunch or breakfast, but can easily serve at lunch or dinner.

Many think of crêpes as being filled with fruit and topped with chocolate sauce or whipped cream. But the best thing about crêpes is that they can be served sweet or savory. You can probably guess that we like ours savory! The combination of fillings for a savory crêpe is endless. Think of anything you would put on a sandwich or a pizza…and read on to see some of our ideas.

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Easy Recipe for Crêpes

Before you can fill them, you need to make some crêpes. Here’s the simple recipe.

Basic crêpe batter: Whisk together 2 eggs, 3/4 cup milk, 1/2 cup water, 1 cup sifted flour, and 1/4 teaspoon salt. Once the mixture is smooth, refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. This allows the batter to thicken, which is an important step in crêpe making.

Once the batter has rested, it’s time to cook the crêpes. Heat a small non-stick pan over medium-low heat. Brush a little melted butter over the surface of the pan. Pour a small amount of batter (about 1 ounce) in the center of the pan. Quickly lift the pan and swirl to allow the batter to spread out into a circle. Cook until the edges of the crêpe look dry, about 45 seconds to a minute. Gently flip the crêpe over and cook for another 30 seconds, or until done.

The crêpe will be dry, yet pliable, but will not take on any golden brown color. Transfer to a plate and continue with the rest of the batter. Stack up the crêpes as you make them. The batter will make a number of crêpes, so it’s okay to consider the first few crêpes as practice (and samples for tasting).

Savory Fillings for Crêpes

Anything goes as a filling for a savory crêpe, so make your own delicious combinations. Here are a few crêpe ideas to get you going:

  • Try a breakfast crêpe filled with crispy bacon, shredded white cheddar cheese, and either scrambled eggs or a fried egg.
  • Fill a crêpe with long strands of thin prosciutto, blanched or steamed asparagus, and crumbled goat cheese.
  • Make a simple béchamel (white sauce) and stir in sautéed organic mushrooms. Place inside a crêpe along with leftover shredded poultry (e.g., chicken, turkey, or quail).
  • For the flavors of a classic ham and cheese sandwich, layer slices of ham, Gruyere, and a thin spread of Dijon mustard.
  • Add crisped pancetta, braised rabbit, and some fresh rosemary inside of a crêpe for a remarkable combination.
  • Fold a crêpe around duck confit (or duck rillettes) and sweet caramelized onions for an elegant lunch.
  • Create a hearty crêpe with leftover braised lamb and herb-marinated tomatoes.