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Posts tagged ‘medallion of foie gras’

Foie Gras Cream Puffs with Black Truffle

Looking for a show-stopping appetizer for your Valentine’s Day dinner? Or perhaps the perfect hors d’oeuvre for a party? Amuse your bouche with these crispy choux puffs  – the silky, creamy, truffle-studded foie gras center makes a satisfying contrast of textures.

foie-gras-cream-puffs-recipe

Ingredients

4 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 eggs
½ cup water
Pinch of salt
½ cup all-purpose flour
Sel gris or Maldon salt
1 Medallion of Foie Gras with Black Truffles, softened

Preparation

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F and line a baking sheet with a silicon mat or parchment paper.

In a medium saucepan over high heat, add butter, water, and a pinch of salt; bring to a boil. Turn the heat to low and add the flour all at once. Stir constantly with a wooden spoon until the mixture pulls away from the pan and forms a ball, about 1 minute. Remove pan from heat and beat in eggs one at a time, whisking until smooth and glossy. Scoop dough into a pastry bag fitted with a standard coupler, no tip needed. Pipe mounds onto the prepared baking sheet (approx. 1½” dia x 1½“ h) leaving a few inches in between each. With a wet finger, gently smooth the top of each mound and sprinkle with a pinch of sel gris.

Bake until the pastries are golden brown and puffed, about 25-30 minutes. The puffs should sound hollow when tapped. Using a bamboo skewer, poke a small hole in each puff to allow steam to escape. Cool completely.

While the puffs are cooling, scoop the softened foie gras into a pastry bag fitted with a ¼ inch tip. Poke a hole into the bottom of each choux puff and fill with foie gras. Serve immediately at room temperature or chill until ready to serve.

Ariane’s Class at Kings Cooking Studio

Ariane shared her secrets to making great cassoulet at Kings Cooking Studio in Short Hills, NJ on Monday night. But it was not just cassoulet!  Ariane talked about the simple techniques that are the backbone of the D’Artagnan lifestyle. Just the basic things a girl from Gascony knows how to do. She seared foie gras and served it with port and grape sauce…and spread medallion of foie gras on sliced bread… then seared duck breast and paired it with a balsamic-red wine reduction into which medallion of foie gras was stirred…and only then came the generous bowls of cassoulet.  The folks that attended the class were not left hungry, that’s for sure!  Did we mention that for dessert she offered French Kisses? At D’Artagnan, those are prunes soaked in Armagnac and then stuffed with mousse of foie gras.

The evening was filled with the conviviality that is so much a  part of life (and eating!) in Southwest France. Ariane had a great time chatting with the students and answering their questions. We hope that the evening inspired them all to make cassoulet, sear foie gras and duck magret at home!

Thanks to the team at Kings Cooking Studio–Randi, Wendy and Steve–who were a delight to work with. We would be happy to come back for another class.

For those at home, enjoy the photos.  We hope to see you at the next event!

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