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Posts tagged ‘mushrooms’

6 Mother’s Day Brunch Recipes

Are you doing brunch for Mother’s Day? Mix up a Mimosa, Bloody Mary, or maybe pop the cork on a bottle of bubbly… this brunch is about to get interesting.

If you are cooking at home for the mom in your life (or moms – hey, multi-generational brunch sounds great!), try one of our exclusive recipes. Developed and tested by our expert staff, these recipes include the sweet and the savory, so there’s something for every taste. You could call it the recipe for a memorable Mother’s Day brunch.

1. Dutch Baby Pancake with Candied Bacon

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The Dutch baby is having a moment right now. Part pancake, part custard, part soufflé, and totally delicious, the Dutch baby is simple and fun to make. Which is why it’s the perfect choice for Mother’s Day brunch. Our recipe has candied bacon, because, well … we love bacon. This bacon-rich Dutch baby is what brunch dreams are made of. Best part? It’s ridiculously easy to make and comes together quickly. Mom will be impressed. Read more

Growing Mushrooms Organically

It’s Day of the Mushroom today! To celebrate, here’s a little behind-the-scenes view of the process of cultivating mushrooms.

Our wild, foraged mushroom selection varies with the seasons, but our cultivated organic mushrooms are available all year. Grown in large mushroom houses, with just the right amount of humidity and at the perfect temperature, these fungi are a minor miracle.

In an effort to recreate the natural conditions of the forest, pristine wood pulp, or another similar substrate, is steamed and purified, then is inoculated with specific mushroom spores.

 

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The substrate steamer.

The inoculated material is placed in large jars with wide mouths. The jars are placed into trays, and then on shelves, which fill large rooms.  The mushrooms grow rapidly in the controlled conditions, and they are monitored and harvested at the optimum time. Because they are not on the forest floor, these mushrooms are not subject to insects and other factors in nature that can compromise their quality.

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Pioppini mushrooms beginning to grow.

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The Marvels of the Morel Mushroom

It’s spring and that means it’s time for morels! The first shipments are arriving at the D’Artagnan warehouse and being snapped up by chefs for their spring menus.

Morel mushrooms are a source of passion and culinary wonder, inspiring recipes, and annual spring festivals across the United States. They are known as a chef’s mushroom with an opulent, earthy flavor and texture that builds wonderful, rich sauces. But the flavor of the morel is so complex that it can be enjoyed simply. Just a sauté in butter with a bit of salt and cracked pepper is all it takes to create something extraordinary.

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Part of what makes them so beloved is the fact that they can be rare and hard-to-find. They are most common in moist deciduous woods, and are often associated with dead or dying elms, sycamore and ash trees, and old apple orchards, though some mushroom hunters report finding morels in their own suburban backyards. The pale, grayish or yellow color of the morel often blends perfectly with the dead leaves on the forest floor in early spring.

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Top 6 Easter Appetizer Recipes

How about a nibble to start the Easter meal? From the simple to the sublime, there’s a little something for everyone here. Small bites, big flavors. Click through to see the recipes.

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1. Tiny quail eggs may take extra time to peel, but they are so cute – and delicious – that it’s worth the effort. Make a big batch of these Scotch eggs, because they are all too easy to eat! With wild boar sausage inside the golden crust they may also serve as a conversation starter.

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2.  The combination of dry-cured ham and fruit is a perennial favorite. In this case, we used pears, and a bit of fresh ricotta; truffle butter on the crostini brings in a tasty new element. The truffle honey is optional, but we highly recommend it.  Just keep this recipe in your back pocket for parties.

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3. Speaking of truffle butter, this recipe for gougeres is going to change your game. Brunch, cocktail parties, holiday gatherings … they all benefit from the perfection of these mouthfuls of airy dough and cheese. They seem so right for the Easter meal, whether it’s a brunch or a feast.

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4. It’s Easter, so everyone expects eggs. Do the grown-up thing and devil some quail eggs and top them with bacon.  Everyone will thank you.

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5. Mushrooms and crème fraîche fill these phyllo triangles with flavor. Yes, we brushed them with truffle butter. Because we can … and so can you!

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6. One last honorable mention, also involving puff pastry, mushrooms and a hint of cream: the vol-au-vent.  This classic hors d’oeuvre makes a lovely presentation, and can be passed or served at dinner, or brunch.

Food for Thought: Stuffed Mushrooms

We never need an excuse to stuff mushrooms….but for National Snack Month Ariane was invited to share her recipe on Local 12 News. Watch the short video here and start stuffing!

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And you can read the simple recipe on our website. Great for parties or snack time, these stuffed mushrooms are a staff favorite.
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Secret Ingredient: Porcini Powder

Our Secret Ingredients series shines a light on products that make all the difference when cooking with D’Artagnan.

Sprinkle a little of this mushroom powder on just about anything for instant umami. We think of it as magic powder, because it has all the earthy power of porcini mushrooms. It can be used in spice rubs, dredges, sautés, creamy dips, sauces and anywhere you want a little oomph. And it’s available year-round, which fresh porcinis certainly are not.

Any mixture of spices can use a bit of porcini powder, whether destined to be rubbed on a turkey, beef, lamb or game bird. Soups, creamy or brothy, as well as stews, can benefit from a soupçon of this precious porcini powder.

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Favorite Side Dishes for Thanksgiving

This week we are offering 15% off holiday essentials – we think of them as the “little helpers” to ease you through this year’s holiday meal and make it extra-special. Things like black truffle butter, duck fat, demi-glace and bacon. Imported French chestnuts and porcini powder bring earthy flavor and umami to recipes like classic stuffing. Speaking of which, maybe your stuffing needs a little foie gras this year. These cubes of flash-frozen foie gras are quite handy at the holidays.

For further inspiration, here are a few of our favorite things to make for the Thanksgiving meal. Just click on the photo for the recipe.

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D'Artagnan Food products

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Save 15% Off Holiday Helpers!

While the holiday bird may take center table (ours truly are stars!), the supporting cast of savory side dishes is just as important. We’re offering some of our favorite ingredients for those dishes at 15% off this week.

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Add flavor and texture to your basic stuffing with our mushrooms or chestnuts. And don’t make a holiday feast without black truffle butter – whether under the turkey skin or in mashed potatoes, it lends a rich, earthy flavor that is completely unique.

Enrich your gravy with our duck and veal demi-glace for silky body and great depth of flavor. Green beans are a holiday standard but have you tried them sautéed in duck fat? Sublime.

Take the stress out of Thanksgiving with 15% off these holiday helpers  – but only until Sunday, November 16th at midnight EST.

And if you haven’t pre-ordered your bird, there’s still time. Click through to peruse your options – we’ve got heritage breed, organic or wild turkeys. And for those who plan a small holiday gathering, we offer bone-in turkey breast and free-range capon.

 

Mad About Mushrooms

We’re more than just meat … did you know that D’Artagnan is also a purveyor of mushrooms?  We follow the seasons around the globe to bring wild mushrooms to our chef clients.  The fragrant and delicate truffles and porcinis, morels, chanterelles, mousserons, hedgehogs, matsutakes, chicken of the woods and many more, come by truck and airplane from just about every corner of the globe. Foraged from woods and mountains by experts, then swiftly transported to us, these are the very essence of wild eating. Their seasonal availability, fragile and perishable nature, and their susceptibility to the vagaries of weather make them all the more precious.

We also offer beautiful cultivated and wild mushrooms that work in many recipes, such as the ones below. We hope they will inspire you to cook a meal that includes mushrooms. And should you be inclined to explore, or rather, to forage for more, you will find others on our website.

Creamed Mushrooms on Toast

This simple recipe is rich and comforting. And while we think it’s totally fabulous as-is, when you add a generous knob of black truffle butter and serve it on petit toasts, it becomes luxurious party food.

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Creamed Mushrooms on Toast, recipe by Colman Andrews

Ingredients

Serves 6

4 tablespoons butter, plus more for buttering rolls
2 lbs wild & exotic mushrooms, brushed clean, cut into pieces of equal size or left whole if small
6 small French rolls
1 cup heavy cream
Coarse sea salt
Chopped fresh parsley, for garnish (optional)

Preparation

1. Preheat the broiler.

2. Melt the butter in a large skillet over medium-low heat. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently, for about 20 minutes, or until they have released their liquor and reabsorbed some of it.

3. Meanwhile, split the French rolls, butter them lightly, and toast them lightly under the broiler. Divide the toasted rolls equally between 6 plates (2 small halves or 1 large half on each plate).

4. Add the cream to the mushrooms, stirring it in well, and continue to cook for another 8 to 10 minutes, or until the sauce thickens. Season to taste with salt, then spoon the mushrooms and sauce over the rolls. Garnish with some chopped parsley, if you like.

Pasta with Foie Gras & Wild Mushrooms

Add a little luxury to weeknight dinner with this simple recipe that uses top-tier ingredients but comes together in minutes. It’s a favorite dish at D’Artagnan, and we’ve served it at many tasting events to great acclaim.

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Ingredients

Serves 4

8 ounces foie gras cubes
1 pound Gemelli pasta, or similar
2 Tablespoons black truffle butter
1 container duck and veal demi-glace
2 cups wild mushrooms, chopped
1 Tablespoon porcini powder
Salt & freshly cracked pepper

Preparation

1. Cook pasta in lightly salted water, to al dente. Reserve about 3/4 cup of pasta water, set aside. Drain pasta, rinse with cool water and set aside.

2. Heat a large, dry skillet over high flame. When hot, sauté foie gras until golden brown (about 1 minute), then remove from pan and set aside. Add the mushrooms to the same pan and sauté for 2-3 minutes.

3. Leaving the mushrooms in the pan, add the demi-glace, reserved pasta water and porcini flour, then reduce by a third.

4. Add the cooked pasta to the pan, toss to coat with the liquid, add 2 tablespoons of black truffle butter, allowing it to melt. Now add the sautéed foie gras, and toss it all together gently.

5. Add salt, pepper, and more truffle butter, to taste.

 Wild Mushroom Bread Pudding

This versatile, savory bread pudding pairs well with meat or poultry and can be baked in a large dish or individual ramekins.

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Ingredients

Serves 8

4 cups fresh brioche cubes (about ½”)
2 lbs assorted wild mushrooms, chopped
2 shallots, finely chopped
3 tablespoons black truffle butter
6 sprigs flat-leaf parsley, finely chopped
10 chives, finely chopped
3 sprigs fresh thyme, leaves only
2 large garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 cup heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
4 eggs
1/2 cup grated hard, aged cheese (such as Parmigiano-Reggiano or Mimolette)

Preparation

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a medium sized casserole, about 9×12.

2. Spread brioche cubes in a single layer on a baking sheet. Bake until golden brown, turning once, about 10 minutes. Set aside.

3. In a large skillet over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon black truffle butter. Add shallots and garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to soften, about 3 minutes. Add mushrooms, season with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring occasionally, until mushroom liquid has evaporated and mushrooms turn golden (about 15 minutes). Stir in thyme, parsley and chives. Cook about 1 minute more, remove from heat.

4. In a large bowl, whisk together cream, milk, eggs, and cheese. Season with salt and pepper. Gently stir in mushroom mixture and bread cubes, turning to coat. Let rest for about 10 minutes, then pour into prepared dish.

5. Bake until slightly firm to the touch, about 30 – 35 minutes. Cool slightly on wire rack, then unmold and serve.

Broiled Wild Mushrooms with Tamari Butter

This simple recipe from Bruce and Eric Bromberg of Blue Ribbon fame, has few ingredients but is packed with umami. It’s a favorite dish at their New York City restaurant, Blue Ribbon Sushi, and once you see how easy and delicious it is from your own kitchen, we have no doubt it will be one your favorites too! And it takes only ten minutes to make.

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Broiled Wild Mushrooms with Tamari Butter by the Bromberg Brothers. Photo: Quentin Bacon.

Ingredients

Serves 4

1 pound wild & exotic mushroom mix, gently cleaned and trimmed if needed
2 tablespoons tamari
2 tablespoons sake
4 tablespoons unsalted butter

Preparation

1. Preheat the broiler.

2. In a medium bowl, toss together the mushrooms, tamari and sake. Arrange on a rimmed baking sheet and dot with butter. Broil, turning once, until tender and golden, about 5 minutes total.

Saucy Series XIII: Mushroom Ketchup

Welcome to guest blogger Deana Sidney of Lost Past Remembered, a blog dedicated to discovering, replicating and adapting historic recipes. In this saucy series she demystifies one of the cornerstones of classic French cuisine: the mother sauces.

Mushroom Ketchup

Heston Blumenthal is a wonderful character. He appeals to me because he loves to play with food and to study ancient recipes to find inspiration for his dishes. His new restaurant, Dinner, in London is a smashing success with dishes that have a pedigree. One of his most popular historical recipes is one for mushroom ketchup.

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Mushroom ketchup has been made for hundreds of years –– you could call it the English version of soy sauce. It’s salty, positively exploding with umami and is an awesome addition to any meat dish, but can also add a wholly vegetarian meaty depth to a vegetable dish as well.

I’ve seen mushroom ketchup mentioned in recipes for years and always wanted to make it. In looking up mushroom ketchup recipes (my 1846 recipe from The Complete Cook was vague about the ratio of salt to mushrooms and I wanted guidance on that score), the more I searched, the more Heston’s name kept showing up.

Although Heston had a simple 18th century recipe for his base authentic mushroom ketchup, I really fell for a slightly more involved recipe from the 19th century that’s full of pepper –– I love pepper. Honestly, it is very little work but a 48 hour soak. Heston’s recipe is only an overnight drip. You will get somewhere around 2 cups of mushroom ketchup out of my recipe –– I did not make his version but in the video of the process, it appeared to generate about the same amount. You can store it forever in the fridge and even use the leftover mushrooms from the process to make a great mushroom pepper (after a wee dry in the oven). I’ll give you both so you can choose. Do buy the freshest mushrooms that you can. Old mushrooms have lost their liquid and will make for much less ketchup. DO NOT buy sliced mushrooms for the same reason –– they will have lost moisture with the cutting. I halved the recipe but it is easily doubled.

Dinner menu

At his London restaurant, Dinner, all his beef dishes are served with mushroom ketchup, but when I see the pictures of the mixture I am confused because the sauce I see is thick and glossy and mushroom ketchup is the texture of soy or Worcestershire sauces. Big surprise, Heston played with the texture –– he likes to play with food. Authentic mushroom ketchup has the same texture as soy sauce –– Heston makes mushroom ketchup plus.

Taking my cue from Heston, I deployed my sauce series partner D’Artagnan’s magnificent pasture-raised boneless strip sirloin steaks as a perfect medium for my mushroom ketchup. The meat was splendid –– so tender and full of flavor. History tastes great.

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Sirloin Steak with Mushroom Ketchup for 2

2 boneless strip sirloin steaks from D’Artagnan
light salt and pepper
1 T olive oil
Heston’s Mushroom Ketchup Sauce

Salt and pepper the steak. Don’t use much salt because the ketchup is salty. Heat a cast-iron skillet till quite hot. Add olive oil to the pan and put the steaks in the pan. Brown each side. The steak will be rare at this point. Cook longer for more doneness. Let rest a few minutes before serving with the mushroom ketchup.

Heston’s Mushroom Ketchup Sauce

2 oz red wine
1 oz red wine vinegar
1 small chopped shallot
pinch of cloves and mace ( I think pepper would be good too if you are not using my recipe for the mushroom ketchup base)
1 c mushroom ketchup (use Heston’s or the recipe from The Complete Cook – recipes follow)*
2 t cornstarch dissolved in 1 1/2 T cold water
drained, marinated mushrooms (recipe follows)

Reduce by 1/2 (his recipe called for 2/3rds reduction and I thought that was too much) and strain out the shallots – you will have a little over 1/2 a cup. Add the cornstarch mixture to the hot mixture and return to a low heat for a few minutes. Stir till thickened and remove from the heat. Add the marinated mushrooms and serve with the steak. Depending on the amount of marinade the mushrooms have soaked up, you may want to toss a bit of the mushroom marinade into the ketchup to your taste – I liked the little extra sweetness that it added.

*mushroom ketchup is thin, Heston’s recipe is a thick sauce made from the ketchup

Marinated Mushrooms

5 oz red wine vinegar
1/4 c sugar
4 oz mushrooms, sliced

Heat the vinegar and sugar to melt the sugar. Pour over the mushrooms and marinate for 24 hours.

Heston’s Recipe for Mushroom Ketchup

(used as base for the sauce, from an 18th c recipe)

1 3/4 lbs mushrooms, sliced
1 1/3 oz salt

Combine the salt and the mushrooms. Enclose in fabric (old t-shirt maybe?) and twist cloth and hang over a pot for 24 hours. Squeeze tightly to extract as much liquid as possible.

Mushroom Ketchup from The Complete Cook

1 3/4 lb mushrooms, pulsed a few times in a food processor or roughly chopped immediately before using
2 oz salt in the original recipe or about 3 T (I think 2T might be better — it’s very salty)
1 oz black peppercorns
1/2 oz allspice berries
1 T brandy

Put the mushrooms and salt in a glass or ceramic bowl and blend well. Let them sit for 2 hours and then stir and cover. Leave for 2 days, stirring a few times a day.

Put into a canning jar with the spices and screw the lid on, you should have around a quart.

Put in a stockpot and bring the water to a low boil (I put a wad of foil at the bottom so the glass wouldn’t touch the metal) for 2 hours. Strain the liquid into another pan using a fine sieve pressing hard on the solids. I finished up the process with a potato ricer that got every last bit of juice out of the mushrooms, but putting them in a cloth and squeezing would work well. Reserve the mushroom pieces that remain from the pressing.

At this point Sanderson recommends reducing the ketchup by half. If you are using it for the Blumenthal ketchup skip this step as the ratio of ketchup to his wine/vinegar mix will be off. Do cool the mixture and add the brandy. Put it in a canning jar. You should have 2 cups unreduced and 1 cup reduced. It is quite salty.

Preheat your oven to 200º, Spread the pepper mushroom mixture on the pan, remove the larger allspice berries and dry for 1 hour or until dried out. Put in a spice grinder and grind. Use as a wonderful mushroom flavored pepper in all your dishes.