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Posts tagged ‘organic chicken’

A Kinder, Gentler Way to Raise Chickens?

The New York Times recently reported that Perdue is making changes in how they raise chickens. They will overhaul animal welfare practices, making their plants more humane to give the birds better lives. It’s good to see one of the largest chicken producers in the nation talking about changes, however small they may be.

At D’Artagnan we have been advocates of humane animal husbandry for over 30 years. We have always supported and partnered with small farms that actually raise animals the most humane way, without antibiotics or added hormones, and at a slower pace.  We’ve been doing this since day one. In fact, our organic chicken was the first on the market – before the USDA had clear protocols in place for organic labeling.

Check out Eater’s article and interview with Ariane on this subject, excerpted below.

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK…

  • How do you feel about Perdue’s announcement?
  • Do you think that real change can come from the massive factory farms?

Share your thoughts with a comment below.

Eater Chickens Perdue Article

Ariane Daguin, CEO and founder of D’Artagnan (an organic meat purveyor), says the labels slapped on meat have become diluted over time, largely due to the influence of the meat lobby. “Big factory farmers that say they produce organic chicken today often simply buy ‘organic’ grain from China — which isn’t even organic by U.S. standards. They can also tout that chickens have access to the outside —  but it’s usually one little door for 100,000 chickens.”

Daguin says the labels are confusing for consumers and “infuriating” for a company like D’Artagnan, which sells organic products at a higher price point than companies like Perdue. Though D’Artagnan and Perdue products might have similar labels, Daguin says her company holds its processes to a higher standard. “When people read the word ‘organic,’ the perception is that it’s a small family farm and the growers respect the animals,” she says. “I wish I could put, ‘more organic than the other guy’ on my product. Labels don’t necessarily mean the same thing for me and for Mr. Perdue, I guess.”

 

Top 7 Chicken Recipes You Need to Try

Tired of the same old, same old when it comes to chicken? You are not alone! Americans consume 90 pounds of chicken per capita each year, and we suspect that much of that is chicken breasts.

How to jazz up your chicken dinner? Start with quality chicken, choose whole chicken or different cuts (sorry, boneless skinless chicken breast!), and try one of these recipes.

1. Black Truffle Butter Buffalo Wings

Oh, yes we did. Take a classic dish with lots of hot sauce and add the miracle of black truffle butter, and you get our “truffalo” chicken wings recipe.  Don’t relegate chicken wings to game day – they make a perfectly good meal anytime of the year.

Truffalo Wings 5

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Enter Our Memorial Day Giveaway!

We know that Memorial Day involves parties around the grill. In the backyard, by the lakeside or where ever you find yourself gathering … there will be food.

And we want you to have the best. So we’re giving away three prize packages valued at $330+ each. Enter the giveaway once for three chances to win! Drawings will be held on May 9, May 16 and May 23. Which gives us plenty of time to ship your prize before the start of grilling season! Good luck!

Entries must be received by 11:59pm EST, May 22, 2016. One entry per email address. No purchase required. We reserve the right to make substitutions if product is not in stock. 

maygiveaway

Prize Assortment Includes:

4 Boneless Beef Ribeye Steaks (16 oz each)

2 Slabs Berkshire Pork Baby Back Ribs (2 lb avg each)

Pasture-Raised Ground Beef (5 lbs)

4 Bone-In Berkshire Pork NY Strip Chops (12 oz each)

1 Game Sausage Sampler (5 packs, 8.5 oz each)

4 Packs Organic Chicken Legs (14 oz avg each)

2 Packs Uncured Duck Hot Dogs (12 oz each)

4 Packs Organic Chicken Wings (1 lb avg each)

Here are a few grilling recipes to inspire … full recipes are linked in the captions. Browse more recipes from our chef friends, cookbook authors, food bloggers and our staff.

coffee-rubbed-pork-chops-recipe

Recipe by Ray Lampe, Coffee-Rubbed Pork Chops

basic-grilled-rib-eye-steak-recipe

Recipe by D’Artagnan, Basic Grilled Ribeye Steak

Duck Fat 50: Duck Fat Fried Chicken Drumsticks

Fried chicken is having a moment right now. It’s showing up in sandwiches, on waffles, at food trucks and in high-end restaurants. Nothing is quite so satisfying. Try upping your game with our air-chilled and organic chicken, and using the secret ingredient that brings magic to all it touches: duck fat.

An overnight soak in seasoned buttermilk, along with pan-frying in a blend of duck fat and peanut oil, makes this chicken extra flavorful, crispy, and browned. It’s equally delicious piping hot or served cold, picnic style.

duck-fat-fried-chicken-recipe

Ingredients

2 tablespoons kosher salt
3 tablespoons black pepper
1 tablespoon ground cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
2 teaspoons celery salt
1 teaspoon dry mustard powder
10-12 Organic Air-Chilled Chicken Drumsticks
4 cups buttermilk
1 tablespoon hot sauce
3 cups all-purpose flour
1 (7 oz.) container Duck Fat, for frying
Peanut oil, for frying

Preparation

1. In a small bowl, stir together the salt, pepper, cayenne pepper, garlic powder, onion powder, celery salt, and dry mustard powder, until well mixed. Divide the spice mix evenly between 2 mixing bowls. Add the flour to 1 of the bowls, mix well, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside.Using a fork, prick each of the drumsticks a few times to let the flavors seep into the meat. Rub the drumsticks with the reserved spice mix, coating evenly. Pour the buttermilk over the chicken, add hot sauce, and cover the bowl with plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour up to overnight.

2. When ready to cook, melt the duck fat in a large heavy-bottomed skillet or Dutch oven. Pour in enough peanut oil to fill the pan about 2.5 inches deep. Heat over medium heat until a deep-frying thermometer inserted in the oil reaches 360 degrees F.

3. Meanwhile, remove the chicken pieces from the buttermilk and in batches, drop them into the bowl of reserved seasoned flour, turning them to make sure they become evenly and heavily coated.

4. Working in batches as to not over crowd the pan, carefully drop the coated chicken drumsticks into the hot oil. Turn the pieces as they brown and do not let them touch each other while frying. If necessary check the underside of a piece by lifting it with tongs. It should be a deep golden brown. Cook the chicken until the pieces are crispy and brown, about 15 minutes, turning occasionally.

5. To test for doneness: Cut into the thickest part of a drumstick. The juices should run clear and the meat should be opaque throughout. If necessary, continue to cook the chicken into a preheated 325 degree F oven, until they are fully cooked. Transfer the fried chicken to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain the excess oil. Serve the chicken hot, room temperature, or cold.

What is Air-Chilled Chicken?

Why does air-chilled chicken taste so much better than the average bird? Here are a few of the key reasons.

Chill Out

Since the mid-1990s the USDA has required that the temperature of a chicken carcass be lowered to at least 40 degrees within four hours of slaughter. Most processors cool chickens in vats of ice cold water, a technique that does the trick, but allows the chicken carcass to absorb water—mostly in the skin (the last place you want it!).

Studies have shown that water-chilled chicken absorbs anywhere from 2 to 12 percent of its weight in water on average. While it might superficially appear that added moisture would be a good thing in a chicken, in fact it dilutes the flesh and flavor, makes it soggy and prevents the skin from crisping when roasted. There is also an increased risk of cross-contamination, since many chickens are dunked in the same water.

D'Artagnan Green Circle Chicken Raw2

A Better Way

In the air-chilling process, chickens are suspended separately from a track that moves through several chambers. In the first, cold, purified air is run over each bird, which quickly reduces its body temperature. Then, depending on the system used, the chickens will cycle through one or two more chilled chambers for anywhere up to 3 ½ hours. The air-chilling process takes longer than the water bath, and the facility is more expensive to set up, but many feel the results are worth the time.

While air chilling chicken and poultry has been in practice in Europe since the 1960s, it was only introduced in the U.S. in 1998.

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Our organic and air-chilled chicken wings

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Interview with Ariane in The Village Voice

Ariane talked to Laura Shunk at The Village Voice recently. Here’s the story of the early days at D’Artagnan and the philosophy behind what we do. Get the low-down on organic chicken, heritage-breed pork and the state of  meat in general.

So go ahead, take a peek inside Ariane’s head in this interview.

Village Voice Screen Shot

 

Happy National Fried Chicken Day!

Crispy, crunchy, juicy, tender!

Fried chicken is American comfort food at its best. It’s also a hotly debated topic: pan-fried or deep-fried, flour dredge or cornmeal crust, buttermilk or brine, peanut oil or duck fat?

Whichever method and ingredients you prefer, we can think of no better day to cook up a big batch than National Fried Chicken Day.

Here’s one of our favorite recipes! It’s the version Chef Thomas Keller serves at Ad Hoc, and it’s got a cult-following. And check out our handy how-to on making perfect pan-fried chicken. Bon appetit!

Duckspotting @ Le Cirque, New York City

Duckspotting is snapping & sending in pics of dishes, from your favorite restaurants, made with D’Artagnan ingredients! We supply restaurants all over the country & love to see what creative chefs are doing with our products. Keep sending them in!

D'Artagnan Air-Chilled Chicken

Where: legendary Le Cirque restaurant

What: Chef Olivier Reginensi’s perfectly roasted D’Artagnan Air-Chilled Chicken

How: Le Cirque is at 151 East 58th Street (between Lexington and Third Avenues) | click here for online reservations or call (212) 644-0202

Newly at the helm of the Le Cirque kitchen, Chef Reginensi and the Le Cirque team have just announced a series of pop-up restaurants in cities all over the country – so even if you don’t live in the NY area, you can still share in the Le Cirque experience and sample Olivier’s beautiful dishes. We hear the first stop will be Orlando in early March, with subsequent stops in Chicago, Orange County, Dallas, Houston, Palm Springs, San Diego, Los Angeles, Atlanta and San Jose. Each evening will recreate the experience found in the iconic Manhattan dining room—down to the smallest details.  STAY TUNED!

Dining out & spot some fabulous dishes made with D’Artagnan ingredients? Snap a pic & email with the details to alishah@dartagnan.com We’ll give you & the restaurant a shout out