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Posts tagged ‘pork chops’

8 Ways to Mix Up Your Grilling Routine

Bored with the same old stuff on the grill? Mix up your grilling routine and try some of our protein alternatives to shake things up! Summer is the perfect time to upgrade your grill game and try new things.

1. Burgers

If you normally grill burgers, try… buffalo burgers. An easy switch! Try our recipe and top your buffalo burger with mushrooms.

Recipe_Mushroom_Lovers_Burger_HomeMedium

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Enter Our Memorial Day Giveaway!

We know that Memorial Day involves parties around the grill. In the backyard, by the lakeside or where ever you find yourself gathering … there will be food.

And we want you to have the best. So we’re giving away three prize packages valued at $330+ each. Enter the giveaway once for three chances to win! Drawings will be held on May 9, May 16 and May 23. Which gives us plenty of time to ship your prize before the start of grilling season! Good luck!

Entries must be received by 11:59pm EST, May 22, 2016. One entry per email address. No purchase required. We reserve the right to make substitutions if product is not in stock. 

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Prize Assortment Includes:

4 Boneless Beef Ribeye Steaks (16 oz each)

2 Slabs Berkshire Pork Baby Back Ribs (2 lb avg each)

Pasture-Raised Ground Beef (5 lbs)

4 Bone-In Berkshire Pork NY Strip Chops (12 oz each)

1 Game Sausage Sampler (5 packs, 8.5 oz each)

4 Packs Organic Chicken Legs (14 oz avg each)

2 Packs Uncured Duck Hot Dogs (12 oz each)

4 Packs Organic Chicken Wings (1 lb avg each)

Here are a few grilling recipes to inspire … full recipes are linked in the captions. Browse more recipes from our chef friends, cookbook authors, food bloggers and our staff.

coffee-rubbed-pork-chops-recipe

Recipe by Ray Lampe, Coffee-Rubbed Pork Chops

basic-grilled-rib-eye-steak-recipe

Recipe by D’Artagnan, Basic Grilled Ribeye Steak

Does Heritage Pork Make a Better Ham?

We can confidently say that heritage breed pork tastes better. It offers a nuanced, deeper flavor and more succulent meat than commodity pork. It tends to be darker in color – not dry and pale like the “other white meat” that is widely available. Did you know that the USDA lowered the minimum cooking temperature for pork to 145 degrees back in 2011? You may be overcooking those chops!

Pork Chops

Berkshire pork chops

Due to more diversity in farming and demand from the public, the rich, marbled fat and tasty meat of heritage pigs is certainly becoming more appreciated by connoisseurs. At D’Artagnan we celebrate the Berkshire hog and sell plenty of cuts like pork loin, racks, chops and tenderloin. We encourage you to taste it and compare to the pork you’ve had in the past.

But heritage breeds sometimes offer up the tastiest pork when they are crossed; a characteristic like large size combines with a distinct trait like fine-marbled fat to produce a meaty hind leg ideal for making ham. We take these heritage breed pork legs and smoke them with real applewood chips, not fake flavorings, and season them with maple and brown sugar and salt, to create a slightly sweet, but still savory ham.

Fully cooked, our applewood smoked heritage ham is an easy solution for a holiday dinner—all you need to do is heat and slice. But a glaze will put the finishing touch on your ham, and make the presentation a bit more dramatic. We have several recipes to choose from. Choose bone-in ham for large groups, leftovers and tableside carving.

And the very same heritage pork can be enjoyed in our boneless ham. Prepared the same way, it offers a lot of flavor in a smaller package, as well as ease of slicing.

orange_glazed_ham_recipe

Spiced orange marmalade glazed ham

And for a small gathering, or just day-to-day use, we offer a boneless petite ham that weighs in at just 1.5 to 3 pounds. It’s perfect for slicing and slathering with Dijon mustard for a juicy ham sandwich. Ham goes well with eggs (just ask Dr. Seuss!), whether in an omelet or diced for a quiche. Chopped and added to egg or potato salad, this lightly-smoked ham is a great addition. Find ways to incorporate it in your favorite dishes.

Boneless heritage ham

Boneless heritage ham

And let us see what you’re cooking. Share pictures on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram – be sure to tag us @dartagnanfoods so we can see your kitchen victories!

All About Heritage Breed Pork

Heritage breed hogs are the old-fashioned breeds that were the norm before the industrialization of farming. They were handy animals to have on a diverse farm because they were natural garbage disposals, eating everything from table scraps to whey, the byproduct of cheese production.

Just a few pigs can clear and turn a fallow field, to prepare it for sowing with amazing speed and efficiency, saving a farmer time and resources. And when autumn came, the pig would give its last measure of devotion, and grace the family table with ham hocks and bacon.

D'Artagnan Heritage Breed Hogs

As more small farms seek a return to the traditional ways, they turn to the old hog breeds – like the Berkshire, Tamworth, Red Wattle and Duroc. The modern pink pig has been bred for lean meat and for its ability to be reared intensively, in confinement. Not so the heritage breeds – many of them are unfashionably fatty (ahem!), with temperaments suited only to spacious barn living and open pasture. And they tend to grow slower than their commercial counterparts, which is not convenient to farmers in a hurry to sell commodity pork.

Many of the heritage breeds came dangerously near extinction when their meat and lard were no longer desirable. But in the “eat them to save them” school of thinking, a generation of farmers has been raising these heritage breed hogs, often selling the pork at a premium through farmer’s markets and other small-scale outlets.

Our Heritage Breed Pork

At D’Artagnan, we source all our Berkshire and heritage breed pork from a cooperative of small farms at the foothills of the Ozark Mountains. Each participating farmer agrees to keep traceable records of the breeding lines, feeds the pigs a natural diet of forage and supplemental corn, soybeans and rolled oats, with no hormones, antibiotics, pesticides, animal by-products or fishmeal. Most importantly, the pigs are given lots of space and sunshine, are allowed their natural piggy behaviors, raise their own piglets, and live outdoors with access to shelter. Pork raised this way costs a little more than the bland, lean, pale pork at the average grocery store, but to support the efforts of these farmers, and to preserve heritage breed pigs, we feel it’s worth it. So we pay our farmers a premium to adhere to these standards. And we think you can taste the difference in the final product.

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Look for our next post on heritage breed ham.

Happy Halloween!

halloween 2013

Yes, that is Vincent Price in the kitchen. Known as a true gourmand, a wonderful host, and an expert on wines, Price was also a world traveler. He and his wife Mary collected recipes from the chefs they met at restaurants, and together they authored quite a few cookbooks. Several can be seen below, and are now out of print and considered collectible. If you find one at a flea market, snatch it up.

vincent price cookbooks

And long before there was a channel devoted to cooking, Price made recordings of recipes, such as this one describing roast pork with prunes (“even prune haters will love this!”), and a pickled mushroom preparation. And let’s not forget the wine. In another record, Price talked about gracious entertaining, which must include wine, and thus: Wine is Elegance. Thrill as you hear him draw out the word “riesling.” And naturally, he raves about California wines long before the rest of the country caught on.

These dramatic recordings in his unmistakable voice even inspired this silly mashup on Youtube.

If you feel like seconds, check out this marvelous online exhibit dedicated to the many aspects of Vincent Price. It seems a fitting activity for Halloween.

Back of the House/Episode 7: Berkshire Pork with Amanda Freitag!

In the latest episode of Back of the House, Ariane & Chef Amanda Freitag are laughing it up in The Brooklyn Kitchen while they prepare two of their favorite recipes for Berkshire pork.

Berkshire pork is known for its juicy, flavorful meat which is heavily marbled. Sometimes known as kurobuta, (which is Japanese for “black pork”) Berkshire is highly sought-after by chefs and home gourmands alike for its sweet, nutty flavor and fork-tender texture.

We source our Berkshire pork from a cooperative in Missouri, at the foot of the Ozark Mountains. About a dozen family farmers raise Berkshire and cross breeds (referred to as simply “heritage”) on pasture, with access to individual houses, water and supplemental grain feed. Families of pigs are left together, to forage and frolic outdoors in pasture. The cooperative is strict about banning the use of antibiotics and hormones on each farm, and about limiting the number of hogs the farms raise. They seek to add another farmer to the cooperative before they add more pigs to any one farm. They are paid a premium for their humanely-raised pork, making the small farm a profitable business, and proving that there might be a future in the old breeds after all.

In this video, Ariane is preparing a flavorful Stuffed Berkshire Pork Loin with Prunes and Porcini, while Amanda is making one of her fantastic go-to pork recipes, Pork Chops with Crisp Ventrèche and White Bean Ragu. Bon appétit!